Help with Activities for Special Ed Preschoolers

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Guess8228, Sep 14, 2007.

  1. Guess8228

    Guess8228 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 14, 2007

    This is my 2nd year teaching Special Ed pre-k after two years of regular ed pre-k. My class last year was very high-functioning (almost at level normal levels, even) and my class this year is very low functioning and do not know numbers, letters, shapes, colors or animals. So now I have to throw out all the old activities I did last year and bring it down to their level and I do not know what to do!!! All of the activity books I have are no help as they are too difficult for them. Can anyone tell me what appropriate activities I can do with them that will help them learn? I have been letting them play all week long while I try and figure this out!!!

    Also, does anyone know of any activity books geared toward special ed?
     
  2.  
  3. Capiayres

    Capiayres Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2005
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 15, 2007

    I know that when I was an aide in a PPCD class, we used a lot of Dr. Jean's songs as well as Greg and Steve songs. There are several songs that focus on shapes and colors.

    What I would do is focus on a specific animal,shape,color or number a week and teach them about that in addition to their IEPs. They could do an art activity that deals with that. We did a lot of art projects that focused on the theme and read books about the theme while the rest was dependent on what their IEP goals were.

    Their workstations could be putting a certain number of objects onto a card that has dots for that number. That is what I am doing with my Autistic Kindergardener who doesn't know that three objects is the number three, but he can put magnetic numbers in order from one to ten.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 15, 2007

    Multi-sensory is important. Communication skills, starting from wherever they are at and pushing them forward. If they are struggling with numbers/letters/shapes/colors/animals, starting simple and few is definitely your best bet, like Capiayres said. Think about simple object and photograph recognition activities. Sorting activities--animals vs people, food vs clothes--with objects, with photos, with pictures. Literacy--your first bid may just be for attention to an entire short picture book. Turning pages front to back. Pointing to pictures. And continue to reiterate the key concepts as you go along--ie, they may not know their numbers, but count as you do things etc just to keep the concepts fresh and in front of them, as a boost to your more explicit teaching.
     
  5. tchecse

    tchecse Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 15, 2007

    Hi:) That was so me last year, so I understand! I will say that it is not necessarily a bad thing that the kids have had some time to play without direction so far, as this has given you the opportunity to see what each child can do when left with your own devices. I always let centers be kid choice the first week, so that I can assess.

    Start by going through a variety of activities to see what each student does.
    Put out playdough with rollers, cookie cutters and hammers. Note who uses the tools, who has no idea, who tries to eat it..
    Shaving cream on tables...see who has sensory issues. Even lower functioning kiddos will smear it around. Draw their names in it for them. Even if they erase it, that is interacting with you.
    Do the same with rice/sand tables, painting at the easel, coloring, etc. until you know what each child needs to be successful at a center.

    As for the colors, I took the advice of a fellow poster and decided to do a color of the month. None of my kiddos know their colors either. We actually have a 15 minute part of our day that is designated at "color work" to do color of the month activities. This month is yellow. So far we have do yellow play dough, yellow tinted shaving cream, yellow moon sand (a giant hit, even with my lowest kiddos), painting on the easel with yellow paints, yellow color books (this you can actually buy on this site on the store tab...a mini book for every color-the whole set is like 3 bucks). Just provide the kids with only that color when coloring but give them a choice of markers or crayons. Next week we are going to do a yellow collage (I will have the pieces pre-cut for this one, so mainly they will just be glueing). We had a Wear something yellow day yesteday, and the last day of the month we will be having a yellow snack day.

    As for specific themed ideas, I use Mailbox preschool magazine and then adapt. If you want some specific themed ideas, PM me and I will tell you how we did them last year when our kids needed almost one to one help (which we didn't have:().
     
  6. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    2,973
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 15, 2007

    I wouldn't fret about all of that stuff just yet. As long as the toys/centers are educational and they are improving learning then I wouldn't feel to bad. Just make sure it isn't the same thing forever, as in rotate centers/areas.

    Some of my kids didn't get colors forever and then one day they just clicked and they knew all of them.

    I agree with music and movement is a great teaching tool fo these guys. I hate DR. Jean's voice, but I use her occasionally. I also use greg and steve, jim gill, and other songs.

    Work on having a brief circle/story time to build up their "attention skills" keep it as interesting and interactive as possible.
     
  7. MaiMama

    MaiMama Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 18, 2007

    I hear you. I am in a similar situation, except I have major behavior problems in my room. Hugs to you. I'd like to hear how you are doing this year.
     
  8. tx ppcd

    tx ppcd Rookie

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 21, 2007

    Whoo-hoo!! My favorite class...preschool special ed!!! I did it for seven years and not by choice I am now teaching life skills...but i'm enjoying it. Your class has to be VERY structured for the little ones. You have to be firm and consistent...it won't hurt them. Please don't view them as "so cute" and think they do not understand what's going on because they do!! I used lots of music and hands on activities. Good luck!!
     
  9. MaiMama

    MaiMama Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 22, 2007

    VENTING

    Did you have autistic kids in your class as well? Kids who ran, bit, hit & scratched, then used their dead body weight to resist doing anything they didn't want to do? Circle with eight kids, seven of which spent half time trying to run away? A room that was open or sectioned off? There's the issue of not knowing what's going on (which seems like it has to be an issue for kids with the cognitive abilities of an infant), and then the issue of having huge sensory needs that block them off or propel them away.

    I don't know. I just had two days that were short-staffed and tremendously difficult. We have to spend so much time on crowd control that little "real teaching" gets accomplished. I can say we'll paint with pudding, but that doesn't mean we can get everyone or even half of them to do it (or do it without painting each other's hair).

    I don't know how I'll survive the year. There's absolutely no way I'll be back next year. We have conflict with the admins. My other SpEd teacher has both of our kids in her class through two-thirds of her planning period while the TAs try to keep them contained. They also added lunch in the classroom.

    I have two little ones at home and don't have the energy to be a decent mommy when I come home. I hate this.
     
  10. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 22, 2007

    Do you have any budget? If you do, check out "shoebox tasks" - located at http://www.shoeboxtasks.com/ . If you don't have a budget, you can even look at some of these tasks and create them on your own.

    We use these in our life skills classrooms and PPCD classrooms. They go from a range of abilities, color matching, letter matching, and then all the way down to "put in /take out"... etc.

    These are great exposure activities, as well as fine motor and the very beginning of vocational skills.

    I'd recommend these to any life skills or PPCD teachers. They're great! They come with all of the pieces you need. It allows the kids to be successful and feel some success. They can start out with hand over hand and if you have a structured, routine-like day, they can work on them each day, and gain independence doing so.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 411 (members: 1, guests: 392, robots: 18)
test