Help w/ 7th G. Tiananmen Square Lesson

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by tphantom, Apr 11, 2010.

  1. tphantom

    tphantom New Member

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    Apr 11, 2010

    Hello all! I have to give a sample lesson plan (7th grade social studies) for a job interview this week and I am having trouble deciding what kind of activity I would like the students to complete. :unsure: I am super nervous about planning an awesome lesson but I'm only working with 55 minutes (I'm used to block scheduling) and I am used to planning high school lessons.

    I am beginning with an activating strategy, followed by a short discussion, a short lecture with background information on the Tiananmen Square Massacre, and I would like the bulk of the lesson (about 20 minutes) to be devoted to some kind of group activity. I was thinking of having the students compare our rights (perhaps a list some of the amendments) with those in China. However I'm not sure how I would structure this activity. Ultimately I would like the groups to meet, discuss, come to a consensus and share their findings with the class as the closing activity for the lesson.

    Any ideas on this? I am hitting a wall and feeling frustrated and nervous! Other suggestions and feedback are also welcome! Cheers! :)
     
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  3. Grover

    Grover Cohort

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    Apr 12, 2010

    How would you go about identifying our rights and the rights of Chinese citizens? Simply by the respective legal definitions, or the practical reality? At this moment, or at some other specified time? How do you compare the conduct of a State that perceives itself to be in crisis with one that does not? Do you compare the massacre at Tiananmin Square with Ohio State, or with the Nazi marchers in Illinois? Which incident in the U.S. better characterizes our 'rights'? The revolution that brought the current form (loosely speaking) of government to China culminated some 60 years ago. Should we compare it's current positions on civil rights to ours now, or ours in 1836- about thirty years before the emancipation of slaves in our country?
     
  4. tphantom

    tphantom New Member

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    Apr 12, 2010

    All very powerful questions Grover but none that I could hope to address in a 55 minute sample lesson.
     
  5. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Apr 13, 2010

    I sure don't think that's a topic I'd bring up in an interview... Did you pick it or was it assigned? You're looking at a lesson that is going to be rather controversial at first glance given that your target audience is 11-12 year olds.

    If that is really where you're going perhaps a analysis/comparison of some pictures of rights abuses (segregated water fountains, etc.) would drive the point home and wouldn't take very long.
     
  6. jessi.lewis

    jessi.lewis Rookie

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    May 5, 2010

    The picture of the man standing in the road would be a great bellringer for that age group!
     

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