Help? Unique Opportunity.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Tegernacus, Aug 30, 2009.

  1. Tegernacus

    Tegernacus New Member

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    Aug 30, 2009

    I recently interviewed for a position as a teacher in a one-room school house on an island with a population of about 50. There are four children from grades prek-1 and I would be the only teacher from now until they leave the 8th grade. I was selected to participate in the second interview with the school committee in a week or so. Not sure anyone here has any experience in this sort of unique situation but what kind of questions do you think may be asked? Any tips you can give me? I'm nervous but really excited and want this job so very badly. Thanks!
     
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  3. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Very, very cool, and I'll bet I know exactly where you are going! Bundle up!

    Possible questions:
    How will you individualize instruction without making one child feel inferior to another?

    What kind of tasks do you think are appropriate for math, etc. at certain grade levels?

    And also important...
    How do you see yourself contributing to island life? Are you the type of person who is comfortable being alone, but also likes the "home" type group activities such as playing cards and fixing meals together?
     
  4. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Oh, the hermit in me is coming out.
     
  5. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Aug 31, 2009

    Interesting that you have this rare opportunity in this day & age. Definitely know how & when to differentiate your lessons between the grade levels as well as when to combine them.

    Good luck!
     
  6. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    Gosh. And it makes ME feel claustrophobic. :lol:
     
  7. krysmorgsu

    krysmorgsu Cohort

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    I would definitely expect some questions on differentiating instruction.

    As far as tips...while I have not seen the "one room schoolhouse" used at those ages, I have seen it done in my content area. I'll share with you what I've seen different teachers do, and hopefully something will help you. Keep in mind that I am talking about high school students, who would see the teacher 1 period a day.

    Some teachers do day on-day off. So on Monday they would work with level IIs while IIIs had classwork assignments, then on Tuesday they'd work directly with the level IIIs while the IIs had classwork assignments. This would continue all week.

    Some teachers do a period version of this.First 20 minutes with the IIs, last 20 minutes with the IIIs. On some days it might not be an even split, if say the IIs had a more difficult lesson, but for the most part they tried to split the time.

    Some teachers have the students work on the same thing, but differentiate by requiring more from the upper level. For example, if both the IIs and the IIIs work on translating a particular passage, the IIIs would have more lines assigned as homework and the questions they would be expected to answer would be more difficult and for their level. In testing, this might mean the students get the same test, but the IIs only have to answer 7/10 questions - which can be either the teacher's choice on what the IIs omit or the teacher can allow the IIs to choose which ones they don't want to answer. The IIIs would be responsible for all 10 questions.

    Some teachers teach to the more advanced students for the most part, but don't hold the lower level to the same standard. It's exposing the lower level, in the hopes that when it comes up for them the next year, they find it easier to master the material. So, using my example, the IIIs need to learn about the uses of participles. The IIs do not. So the teacher teaches both of them, but when it comes time for testing, the IIs are only responsible for recognizing that a participle has been used, while the IIIs have to recognize how it's been used and translate accordingly. The hope is that, though the IIs might not fully grasp the concept of participles this year, when they learn it as IIIs they will be familiar with it and master the concept more quickly.

    Good luck! I hope that some of what I've said is helpful to you!
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 31, 2009

    PM Jaimemarie.

    She did a stint in a 1 room schoolhouse about 2 years ago.
     
  9. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    No advice, but good luck!
     
  10. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    sounds interesting, is it on block island?
     
  11. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Aug 31, 2009

    My mom's very first teaching assignment was a one room schoolhouse in Australia. She had some stories to tell, but that was in the dark ages before computers made the job a little easier (I think). The state put them through school so your first few years you were often assigned the outback or inner city (which my father got).

    Speaking of computers, I am betting they use technology a lot and you will be asked how comfortable you are with technology and problem-solving yourself. Also just in general, can you work independently without back-up so you will have to be good at discipline, too.

    Sounds like a great opportunity as long as you won't miss people.
     
  12. greengables

    greengables Rookie

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    Oh, how cool! Keep a detailed diary and write a book and become famous!
     
  13. Hoot Owl

    Hoot Owl Aficionado

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    I would think they'd want you familiar with distance learning.

    Congrats on the great opportunity.

    Keep us posted.
     
  14. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 31, 2009

    That sounds wonderful!!
     
  15. Canadian Gal

    Canadian Gal Habitué

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    Sounds a bit like being on a Hutterite Colony to me. Because I was the only teacher, we cycled the K-3 curricula in different areas, 4-6 and the 7-9. I taught Math the same way Krys suggested, and I worked with the K-3's one day, the 4-6's another and then the 7-9. In Social Studies and Science, we used a lot of inquiry style projects, however they had to be culturally sensitive, because of the nature of the Hutteritte way of life.

    In English, leveled Reading and Spelling were my Gods.
     
  16. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    Aug 31, 2009

    What a great opportunity! Can you do an intro to the main lesson you are teaching, and then each ability level group into their respective groups to work on a grade-appropriate follow-up?
     

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