Help! The kids are controlling me.

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by newteacher06, Jan 11, 2007.

  1. newteacher06

    newteacher06 New Member

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    Jan 11, 2007

    Well, I have rec'd my evals from the 1st half of the year and I have gotten U for Classroom management. Ugh! These kids are controlling the classroom, not the teacher. Here's the scenario...let me know if you have any suggestions...anything and everything is MUCH appreciated.

    1st grade
    NEVER taught before nor have I had any classroom management training

    2 ADHD children on meds that NEVER take them.
    1 overly talkative, grown, and disruptive child
    1 child that withdraws constantly
    a few aggressive children

    Morning routine isn't bad. Things seem to fall apart after lunch. I have been told to ignore behaviors but it seems like I am ignoring them too much. I use play money as reinforcement of positive behaviors, but I have a bank that I control rather than giving the money to the kids to keep up with. I also have a stoplight.

    Any clues on how I should take care of these behaviors to get things back on track and also some sort of management system.

    1 - Running around the classroom - Yes, I have kids running after each other in the room.
    2 - Laying on the floor and in the closets
    3 - Throwing crayons, erasers, pencils, books, and sometimes chairs in the room.
    4 - Arguing with each other and the teacher.
    5 - Kids are constantly picking on each other and when the other child tells on them it disrupts the classroom.

    Any suggestions???? THanks in advance. :)
     
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  3. collegefbfan889

    collegefbfan889 Rookie

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    Jan 11, 2007

    I teach 8th grade and I have taught seventh grade. Some of the following may work. I am not sure about your grade level though.

    Pick the students that cause the most trouble and give their parents a call. Arrange a conference and tell the parents the deal.

    Send letters home by mail or by the student (if they can be trusted) that describe each student's conduct or lack thereof.

    Talk to the administration about the real serious problems.

    It does sound like the class is sort of wild. My first year was like that when I started teaching. It was 7th grade no less. I made a complete turn around though.

    Just go in class one day (soon) and tell the students what you expect. Demand that they listen to you, and if they don't, march them to the nearest phone and call home. This may set the one and only example that needs to be set. Others will follow suit.

    I have also used the element of surprise. I would have a bag of treats, and I would give one to each student that I did not have to speak to for negative behavior that day. They would receive these at the end of the day. They may expect it on an everyday basis, but I would let them all know that it had to be earned.
     
  4. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jan 11, 2007

    The beginning of the year we had: ADHD (no meds), several other attention issues, 4 thumb sucking, one anger issue, one not emotionally or academically ready, several who shut down (up to 1 hour). Thankfully, we have a small class and aide (me). We were clueless.

    We went boot camp on them including our tone (voice/face). We reviewed rules often. If they shut down, I tapped them hard and forcefully said "I do NOT accept that!" I used a countdown and leaned in on them. If they didn't cooperate, consequences included principal's office, chair outside, missing a fun activity (hated), missing recess, etc. I would warn them ahead if needed (preventive care). It sounds mean, but these kids lacked discipline. Once I established authority, I balanced it with positive comments, and priveledges. It took time. We still have some attention and ADHD issues, but the room as a whole, has stopped many behaviors (temper & shut down stopped completely), the rest are more manageable (but alot of work). I implement the same rules and strictness, but sometimes use a slightly different level of tone depending on the kid. Some are sensitive (especially girls). That was kept in mind. Be consistent.

    I implemented a WOW system after the kids started demonstrating self-control. They get punches for 3 periods in the day. Each punch, earns a school buck. 3 punches earns 4 bucks and a WOW certificate to show parents. They are proud!

    I still compliment and get stern. This group is constant structure (watch transitions) and supervision. I now reward them with responsibility chores (ex. errand to the office). whereas before I couldn't trust them. Only 1 kid is thumbsucking. They must wash hands every time I see them do it. They got tired of it.

    With an ADHD kid (constant motion) and others running alot, consider more active (or hands on) activities.

    Our ADHD kid sometimes has to be moved back/apart a little. Then he can't touch, the kids can't see him/copy, and he can move a little(accepted if he pays attention). I mostly stay behind him (while she teaches) and gently tap him (which refocuses him). Sometimes sitting him in a chair, instead of the floor (away) helps. When I am alone, he sits beside me (circle) and I gently rub this knee and he refocuses. I've read about ADHD kids having velcro to keep them moving (thus more focused). A deaf kid would miss signing by looking down.

    You need your behavior consultant's advice.
     
  5. charleybrown'sT

    charleybrown'sT Rookie

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    Jan 11, 2007

    Try positive remarks like,"Look at Suzy doing what I asked... WOW" I give out skittles for good behavior and staying on task. I have an excellent student. I said that if anyone does not know what to do to look at Suzy. One day I moved all the Kindergartners to red and they ahd to earn back to green- of course I moved all the ones that didn't need to be moved first. They knew I was serious!
     
  6. Mrs_Goatess

    Mrs_Goatess Comrade

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    Jan 11, 2007

    As for the laying on the floor/in closets, can there be made a time when this is appropriate (self-guided reading or cool-down after lunch/recess)? It seems a behavior they enjoy that can be given an appropriate time and place. Perhaps even a reward?
     
  7. teach2heart

    teach2heart Rookie

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    Jan 11, 2007

    I can completely relate to what you are experiencing! I too am a first-year teacher in 1st grade and have a very challenging class behaviorally. I would love to talk more about this and share ideas about behavior plans, what works & what doesn't. My kids also have a much more difficult time in the afternoons. It seems that it just takes a few students to throw off the classroom! Keep doing your best, being firm and consistent. We WILL make it through this year! :)
     
  8. wkford

    wkford Rookie

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    Jan 25, 2007

    Oh, I feel your pain! I had this going on too. Right after Christmas, I started a new thing with my class. I wrote a poem on sent. strip and placed it on the wall along with one paper link. For each day they helped each other follow rules and reminded their friends to play the right way... I add a link. When the chain of links reach down to the floor, we celebrate by having a cookie/pizza party. It has worked miracles, and when they begin to get wild I turn off the lights and remind them that they need to find their "link earning" behavior. I got this from another site, can't remember where.... but here's the poem:

    For all the good we do and say
    I'll add another link today!
    And when the links and floor do meet,
    Mrs. Ford will bring a special treat!

    (We recite it each morning during circle time as a reminder to them) I have been very suprised at how it has worked out for me...but consistancy is the key!)
     
  9. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Jan 25, 2007

    If they are really ok in the mornings, I think you need to focus on what goes on to make this behavior start after lunch. If you think it's because they're burnt out from a long morning, then maybe do something to let off steam right after lunch. If it's the transition from the more free lunch mode back to classroom behaviour, then you'll need to focus on helping them make the transition.

    Have you ever tried brain gym? It's a series of simple little exercises (about 1-2 minutes each, can do three) that are supposed to help kids get into gear for learning and classroom behavior. You could even give names to these activities that will remind kids to mentally change gears. (e.g. "Now let's put on our thinking caps" when doing a head exercise)

    I really sympathize... I have a class like this, too, except I'm a rotating aide so I don't spend enough time in that class to implement any kind of helpful system. I do spend enough time in that class to get thoroughly frustrated!
     
  10. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Jan 31, 2007

    Bored of Ed, that's what I was going to suggest as well! Kids of this age have a LOADS of energy! Doing some simple exercises before the day begins (and even before each new SESSION if necessary) will really get them prepared- and it'll help you, as the teacher, to relax and focus.
    Apart from this method, a colleague of mine has made up some free resources for the types of problems with management you're having. As you can see in this forum, you're not alone in this!
    Anyone at all is most welcome to have a look through and apply these free resources accordingly to your situation. It's all easy and adaptable stuff I promise!
    Hang in there and take no prisoners! ;)

    ThinkOutLoud

    PS Feel free to browse, free and easy to apply starting tomorrow - I guess you've got nothing to lose now ;)
    www.classroom-management.org/free1NDC.html

    www.reviewed-information.com/classroom1ndc.html
     

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