help teaching blending

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by chrissy, Oct 4, 2007.

  1. chrissy

    chrissy Rookie

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    Oct 4, 2007

    I plan on talking to the reading coach at my school, but I thought any other advice I could get would be great.

    We just got our DIBELS results back. What can you do to help students who know what sounds the letters make, but can't seem to blend those sounds to make a word?

    Practice? Repetition? Is there anything else you have tried and been successful with?

    This is my first year teaching so I obviously don't have previous experience with this.
     
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  3. cdorey13

    cdorey13 Rookie

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    Oct 5, 2007

    I taught 1st last year and we also had DIBELS! I loved it! Anyways, we always told the kids to "keep their motors running" so they cannot isolate the sounds. I always told them they couldn't do "computer talk" we-are-at-home or c-a-t that instead we had to keep our motors running and some kids I made them put their hands on their throats to feel their motor going. Start slow just blending two letters... ca, bi, le, exc. then jump to three, do the nonsense word pages that come with DIBELS because when they are not real words then the kids are forced to sound them out and blend and not guess a real word. I just tell them ahead of time that they are not real words because I don't like them to get confused! Hope that helps!
     
  4. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

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    Oct 6, 2007

    Write a few nonsense words on board/easel. Model how to say the sounds and blend them to read the word. Have students do a few with you. Write some more words have students read them on their own. It might be a little early in the year for this, but have students make up their own nonsense words. This helps them to understand the activity better. They need to realize that each word has a short vowel sound. We progress monitor our low students each week and we usually see improvements.
     
  5. ZoeMaui

    ZoeMaui New Member

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    Oct 12, 2007

    I use open court but I really like the blending portion. My kids really picked up on it and blend really well. I'm going to try to explain this the best I can:

    For instance the word FROG

    Write F on the board and ask for the sound.
    Write R next to F and ask for the sound of R only
    Write O next to FR and ask for the sound of O only
    Have them blend FRO together
    Then write G after FRO and ask for the sound of G only
    Have them blend it all together to say the word.

    Another example for JUMP

    Write J and ask for the sound
    Write U and ask for the sound of U only
    Have them blend JU together
    Write M next to JU and ask for the sound of M only
    Write P next to JUM and ask fro the sound of P only
    Have them blend all the sounds together and they will say the word.

    I hope this makes sense. You have the kids say individual consonant sounds up until the vowels. They first blend when you get to the first vowel then go back to the individual consonants sounds.
     
  6. chrissy

    chrissy Rookie

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    Oct 12, 2007

    I use open court as well so I know exactly what you are talking about with the blending procedure. That is how I do it. I'm talking more about when we are reading the decodable books or when the DIBELS tested. I have some children that add in sounds that are not there or leave out sounds when they are blending. I know that they know what sounds the letters make, but there is some kind of disconnect when it comes to blending in order to read. I guess I need to just have them start with only blending a couple of sounds and mastering that first. I have also started to progress monitor so hopefully I will see the improvement soon.

    Thanks everyone!
     
  7. maroki

    maroki Comrade

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    Oct 12, 2007

    On the DIBELS testing, are you taking about for the NWF section or the ORF section? Because for the NWF section, they can say the sounds seperately as long as they read them correctly and still get credit.

    At my school we use the Read Well program, and our K program has these cards called "Smooth Blending" cards that work pretty well. They are seperated into three or four sections, depending on how many sounds the word has. Each section adds another sound. Underneath each letter is an upside down bump (picture something similar to the bottom half of a circle) that the kids are supposed to trace their finger along as they are reading. The sounds build on themselves and because the smooth blending "bumps" are all connected, they keep saying sounds and start to blend the words.

    The cards look something like this, only with the half-circles connecting each letter:

    C

    C A

    C A T
     
  8. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

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    Oct 13, 2007

    We were told that students should score 50 on NWF by the end of first grade and be reading at least 15 of them as words. We encourage the students to say the sounds and then blend them together to read the words. Some students are able to read the words very rapidly, others are only able to say the sounds at this point.
     

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