Help! Teacher is hinting at failing my Kindergartener

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by momtothree, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2007

    My story is a bit long, but I'd appreciate any help from a kindergarten teacher!!

    My 6 1/2 son Jack was diagnosed with a verbal speech disorder when he was 3. With LOTS of help through therapists he is now speaking much better, probably that of a 4-5 year old. He misuses the pronouns "her" and "him" , like "Her threw the ball." Otherwise his speech is pretty understandable, other than /st/ and /sp/ sounds. (We do correct him by repeating his sentences the correct way though)

    When he turned 5 I thought he was not ready for Kindergarten so I kept him home. When he turned 6 he still was not interested in book learning and his attention span was a little short so I decided to homeschool him and find creative ways to teach him. That did not work out well so 1 month ago I put him in Kindergarten, full days rotating 2-3 days per week, a total of about 13 school days now.

    He is not immature, and he tries to listen to the teacher. He is sweet and kind and respectful, etc. He knows all of the letter sounds and half of their names. (I taught him the sounds first) He is sounding out 3 letter words and a few sight words. He colors nicely and will sit and listen to a story but may have trouble repeating the story back. He can count to 20 but might skip a number or two. He can write to 20 with one mistake, backwards 5s and 3s. He cannot skip count and he does not recognize coins or their worth. He does not understand what weeks, months or years are. He does understand "yesterday" and "tomorrow". He uses his pencil and scissors correctly. He really likes going to school and has a positive attitude. He needs some help in a few areas, but special education??

    However, his teacher has it in for him for some reason. Its her 2nd year teaching. She likes to nit-pick every little thing and blow it out of perportion. Teacher: "He always puts his papers in his take home folders before I stamp them and I have to repeat myself and keep reminding him not to do that..." "He could only sort a group of objects one way (color) and when I asked him to think of another way they could be sorted he couldnt think of one."

    But now she wants him in special education because he needs extra help. I dont get it. Its like she expects him to know all of the kindergarten skills before he entered her classroom. I'm starting to regret even enrolling him.

    I have not signed the special ed permission form yet. I asked for her to send me letter or email to list his strengths and weaknesses (because I really want her to think about his strengths just for once).

    Please give me your opinions on this teacher. I tried to be as accurate as possible. And most important: What are your guidelines for holding a child back and would you ever hold back a 6 year old? My son turns 7 in the summer and she better not hold him back to repeat Kindergarten in the fall. :mad:

    Thank you for your help!
     
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  3. born2teach84

    born2teach84 Comrade

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    Feb 26, 2007

    This is a tough question. I would say as a teacher we see a wide spectrum of children. Guidlines for retaining children is diffrent wherever you go. We definanlty have to talk with our grade team and the higher beings. We have to show the students weakness and strengths. The main thing we have to show is that they have not grown in the year. That is key for retention. We have to prove the child isn't making growth for the year. If that is the case then the child can be retained. From what is sounds your child is slightly below kindergarten standards, but it sound likes the teacher is trying to get services for your children to better him. Don't think of special ed as a bad thing. If your child has a speach disorder it may hinder his learning. Special ed actually can be really benificial because your child is able to get one on one attention which in turn will help him be brought up to grade level standards. I know as a parent it can be scary and hard to think about but from a teachers point of veiw I wouldn't advocate for a child to receive services unless I felt that in my heart it would only make them better. Sometimes we will put children up for special ed and not retain them so they are kept with their peers but are still able to receive extra attention.

    State standards are hard to meet. If our kinders don't come in with tons of knowledge they are considered below grade level. Your comment: "Its like she expects him to know all of the kindergarten skills before he entered her classroom." is in a way true. We do want our children to come in with tons of skills because of the pressure we feel from state standards. I know as a parent that sounds obsurd but its true. Since your son comes in with a speech disorder that may have caused him to have to play some catch up which is ok. I know this may not be what you want to hear, and like I said before I don't know all the story. I hope this helps a little. I just want you to know that if she is out to get your son I would go talk to my principal and see what they have to say. They may be able to have a converstation with the teacher and you to help make the situation better. I think you asking for a weakness and strengths letter was a good idea that way as a parent you can also state the strengths and weakness you see. I hope this helps a litte.
     
  4. Beary Fun Teach

    Beary Fun Teach New Member

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    Feb 26, 2007

    Response to Help! My child's Teacher wants to retain

    As a Kindergarten teacher in north Florida our standards are very high for Kindergarten. Our students have to know all their letters and sounds and be able to sound out simple three letter, short vowel words; write a simple story with sight words and inventive spelling.( One day I saw a brown dog. It was playing.) We also require 52 sight words they must memorize. We also do Spelling Tests with the word families (dog, log, jog, fog ) each week.

    As for Math skills they need to be able to write numbers 0-30 consistently, with few reversals; count to 100 consistently by 1's, 5's, 10's and 2's to 20; know coins and their value; be able to identify days on the calendar...such as how many Mondays or what was yesterday, today and tomorrow. Students also need to be able to find higher numbers on a 100's chart when called out in class.

    As for stories and language, students need to be able to retell a story in sequence; identify characters, plot, and setting.

    When we decide to retain a child it is based on a TEAM decision of teacher, principal and grade level teachers. We also consult 1st grade teachers if a child is borderline or has been retained before. Since your child is already a year older and showing learning difficulties he needs interventions to help to be successful. It is the teacher's job to refer a student to help them in all ways possible. If he is struggliing with skills and the teacher feels she is meeting his needs as best she can in class, she should ask for extra help for your child. It's for their benefit to receive extra services through special classes. It's not an attack on your child, she wants to help.

    I hope this helps some. I think most teachers are looking out for the best interest of their students. When we want to retain a child, it's because we know when they get to the next grade THEY WILL STRUGGLE AND HATE SCHOOL if they have already met frustration in Kindergarten. It only gets harder as they grow older. If the child is already performing below grade level, they will really be low in the next grade.

    GO VISIT A 1ST GRADE CLASS AND TALK WITH A 1ST GRADE TEACHER. That usually helps my parents see whether or not their child is ready to go to the next grade.:angel:
     
  5. JenL

    JenL Comrade

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    Feb 26, 2007

    i was shocked by all that happened in just two weeks...that is what stuck out in my mind as i read your post. i have a student in a situation like your sons in my second grade class....she went to kindergarten was not ready for first grade but the teacher let her go on...last year she was in first grade and started off the year terribly and as a result her parents home schooled her....she came back to my first grade classroom at the semester this year. she is way below grade level but we will not meet to discuss what action (special education) until she has been back at the school and in my classroom for 9 weeks. 2 weeks seems way too early to figure anything out especially in regard to special education for a student you know just two weeks....
    i think your son being so old should not be held back...as a first grade teacher i see students come in all over the place and by the middle of the year most of them even out....
    i would go visit a first grade classroom and talk to someone about how quickly your son's teacher is making assumptions. hope this helps.
     
  6. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2007

    Hi,
    Thank you all for your responses!!! I really didnt think anyone was going to help me out here, but boy, you all really care a lot about kids you dont even know. Thank you.
    I mistyped when I wrote 2 weeks. He has been in school for 1 full month, but since he goes only 2-3 times per week (rotating) it only been 12 days of school. I hope that clarifies things.

    Thanks again!!
     
  7. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    Feb 26, 2007

    You still have time. First thing you should do is look up the state standards for your state.

    These are with what we must work. Your next step is to talk with the teacher and figure out exactly what she is doing in the class so you can provide a consistant approach at home. If you have a husband try to get him involved. Volunteer in the classroom. Read at least 20 to 30 minutes to your child every night. Try to expand on his experiences. Take him to new places, encourage conversations about what you see. Then remind him of what he saw and ask more questions. Go get dirty, play, make a mess have lots of fun but talk, talk, talk and read, read, read. When you find yourself in "that most terrrible place... The Waiting Place," Then think of fun games: Count things, Sing (yes in public), Rhyme. Then after all of your adventures. Have some sit down time where you mirror some of what the teacher does. And if they are offering resources for your child to obtain one on one....Take it. The problem might be the teacher, but try everything else first. It is unlikely that she has it in for your child. However, it is very true that teachers can often be blinded to some of the best qualities in certain children, but give her the benefit of the doubt first; she is a professional; and kindergarten teachers tend to care.... A LOT :) :D
     
  8. love_reading

    love_reading Comrade

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    Feb 26, 2007

    GO VISIT A 1ST GRADE CLASS AND TALK WITH A 1ST GRADE TEACHER. That usually helps my parents see whether or not their child is ready to go to the next grade.:angel:[/QUOTE]

    I like this! I may have to use it with one of my parents who believes their child is "just bored" in kindergarten and thinks he can move on to first next year! (But that's another thread!) lol

    I agree with others who have mentioned that students really need to master certain skills before they should move on to first in order to succeed. However, in our district kindergarteners are not really tested for special ed unless they have previously been in services. For example, Early Childhood Special Ed or have already been diagnosed by a doctor. Sad, but true. So, we usually send children on who have repeated kindergarten so that they can get tested for services in first. I hope that makes sense!
     
  9. nckteacher

    nckteacher Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2007

    your child

    I am a new teacher and I currently have several children in my class that have exceptionalities. In my county we are not allowed to request that a child be placed in a special ed class at all during kindergarten. They have all students in a regular ed classroom. Are you papers and teacher's request to put him in a special ed classroom or to get him pull out services? We have paperwork that parents can fill out for pull out services such as speech or resource. Being a new teacher has been a big struggle for me and I have faced a lot of challenges that has made it very tough. However, I would never jump to conclusions about a child's placement in a special ed classroom. If a parent came to me about this situation I would seek advice from the guidance counselor at the school. They can usually direct you in the right direction. In my state a student has to be able to identify all letters (cap. and small) in the alphabet. They also have to be able to count to 30. If a student is getting pull out services or has qualified for future special ed then they are sent on to the next grade. Just hang in there with your little guy!
     
  10. forkids

    forkids Cohort

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    Feb 27, 2007

    In our district, special ed encompasses everything from a slight speech problem to severe disabilities. Anything not provided in the regular classroom setting falls under the heading special ed. Parents often have the misconception that special ed means the teacher thinks their child has a severe problem, when the teacher is just trying to get the child into speech or get them a little extra 1-on-1 help to catch up. Maybe you could meet with the teacher and question exactly what help she wants to refer your child for. If extra help is available, I think now is the time for your child to get it - not later when he is seriously struggling. Good luck! I hope you get what your little guy needs.
     
  11. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Feb 27, 2007

    Also just another perspective... I'll post more when I get home tonight. ;)

    BUT... receiving special ed. services in K or 1st doesn't mean your child "is special ed" the rest of his school career. I've seen kids who get some extra help in K, 1, 2 and by 3rd are caught up where they don't need extra help.
     
  12. teacheratheart

    teacheratheart Companion

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    Remember, the goal of special ed is to get them in, get them help and caught up, and get them back out into the regular classroom full time. This obviously doesn't apply to every single special ed student, but from what I've read, it does seem to apply to your student. I've never seen kindergarten that's only a couple days a week. On the days that he doesn't go, I would make sure that you were working with him some. Not all day but enough to reinforce numbers and letters.
     
  13. Commartsy

    Commartsy Companion

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    Feb 27, 2007

    I am curious about why the little guy doesn't go every day. Is that the school's schedule?
     
  14. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    This school district has 2 options: half day every day or full day on Mon & Thurs and every other Wed.
    I thought going full days 2-3 times per week would be better.
     
  15. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    Thank you for the wonderful ideas! Its crazy, but it's so easy to forget about all of the teachable moments a parent has to offer. It's easy to rush a child out of the way when you have a thousand other things to get done, you know? Sometimes we need reminders to stop and take advantage of the hundred different teachable moments we have. ughhh.... I regret all of those missed moments now but I feel reassured that it's not too late like you mentioned. Well, I have today that's for sure!! I've been explaining everything with my son and we are spending the day doing things TOGETHER. Your advice is priceless, it really is.
    I wonder if there is a book on this I need more ideas I think, as crazy as it sounds.
    I do have one question: I looked up my state standards (South Dakota) and it seems Jack's teacher is pushing him to hard.. To write to 50 when the standards say only to 20?? Can teachers set their own standards and if so, whats the point of even having state standards if the teacher's are setting their own in place of them?

    Thanks so much!!
     
  16. Commartsy

    Commartsy Companion

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    Our district does every day, full day kindergarten. Am I wrong to think that it's strange that a state would mandate such high proficiency and allow schools to have 1/2 time classes?
     
  17. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    I know! That's what my husband and I have been trying to figure out. This is only her 2nd year, maybe she doesn't realize that her standards are a bit high for half time classes? I figured she teaches class aproximately 95 days when other schools with full day Kindergarten classses are teaching more than 200 days.
    I have listed the standards below from her own teacher's website.

    South Dakota Mathematics Standards


    KINDERGARTEN ALGEBRA STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    1. compare collections of objects to determine more, less, and equal.

    2. recognize and create a variety of sets and patterns using symbols.

    3. recognize that addition or subtraction is used to solve problems.

    4. recognize and explain + and - symbols.

    5. use symbols to represent known and unknown quantities.

    6. use informal methods to solve everyday problems.

    7. explore and model possible addition and subtraction combinations for a given number.

    KINDERGARTEN GEOMETRY STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    1. identify and draw plane geometric figures. (example: square, rectangle, circle, triangle)

    2. identify and describe solid figures. (example: cube and sphere)

    3. compare and sort plane figures based on observable attributes.

    4. identify and describe geometric objects in the environment and describe their position. (example: such as next to, top, bottom)

    5. explore various geometic patterns.

    KINDERGARTEN MEASUREMENT STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    1. identify coins and their value. (example: penny, nickel, dime)

    2. explore and compare orientation in time. (example: yesterday, today, tomorrow, days, hours, minutes, weeks, months, years, seasons)

    3. explore length, weight, and volume of objects using standard and non-standard units.

    4. order a group of objects by measurable attributes.

    5. explore various tools used in measurements.

    6. compare objects or events using direct comparison according to a given attribute. example: length (longer/shorter), height (taller/shorter), volume (holds more/holds less)

    7. compare temperatures of different objects. (example: hot water, cold water, ice cubes)

    KINDERGARTEN NUMBER SENSE STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    1. count and group numbers, objects, and simple events.

    2. recognize patterns from counting by number groups, using concrete objects and a calculator. (example: 2s, 5s, 10s)

    3. represent numbers through the use of physical models, word names, and symbols.

    4. identify ordinal positions of objects in a set. (example: 1st, 2nd, 3rd )

    5. use objects to model addition and subtraction.

    6. determine the number of objects in a set when one object is added or subtracted.

    7. demonstrate and describe that a whole is composed of fractional parts using things encountered in daily experiences.

    8. represent problem situations using concrete objects.

    9. estimate answers to problems using comparative words. (example: greater, fewer, more, less)

    10. explain how to solve story and picture problems.

    11. explore place value by grouping objects by tens and ones.

    12. order a set of numbers based on value.

    13. use relationship vocabulary to describe value and magnitude of objects. (example: bigger, smaller, more, less, same, equal)

    KINDERGARTEN PATTERNS, RELATIONS, AND FUNCTIONS STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    1. sort and classify objects according to similar attributes. (example: size, shape, or color)

    2. identify common attributes found in different groupings.

    3. explore effects of change on a pattern.

    4. identify and extend repeating patterns found in common objects, sounds, and movements.

    5. create repeating patterns.

    6. identify potential arrangements/combinations for sets of three objects.

    KINDERGARTEN STATISTICS & PROBABILITY STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    1. describe ways to sort and/or group given sets of objects or data.

    2. collect and record information using tallies, picture graphs, or other strategies.

    3. describe and compare observable quantities of collected data. (example: the flavor of ice cream most people liked)

    4. explore chance using game situations and spinners.

    explore the concept of probability through the use of chance events. (example: coin toss, dice, spinners)

    South Dakota Social Studies Standards

    KINDERGARTEN

    The standards for kindergarten students include learning the concepts of people, places, and self as related to self and family. Yearlong goals involve learning about historical time sequence, geographic direction, and economic choices. Kindergarten students will use maps and globes to identify and locate places related to their lives and stories in history. Citizenship education includes trust, respect, responsibility, fairness, and caring. Students will have opportunities to learn about national symbols. They will learn how individuals acquire the economic goods and services they need and want.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    KINDERGARTEN HISTORY STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    describe examples of past events in legends and historical accounts, such as stories of Johnny Appleseed, Betsy Ross, Squanto, and George Washington Carver;

    recognize characteristics of American leaders through exposure to biographies of important people of our past, such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Rosa Parks; and

    connect people and events honored in commemorative holidays, including Native American Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Independence Day, Martin Luther King Day, Presidents’ Day, and Memorial Day.

    KINDERGARTEN GEOGRAPHY STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    compare and contrast the relative size and location of people, places, and things by identifying here/there, near/far, up/down, left/right, and behind/in front.

    use a map and map symbols to recognize directions, continents, and poles.

    use map symbols to recognize land, water, roads, and cities.

    locate areas referenced in historically based legends and stories.

    compare the globe and a map as models of the earth.

    recognize that, in addition to maps and globes, geographic locations are communicated through various representational models: pictographs, bar graphs, and diagrams.

    demonstrate familiarity with the layout of his or her school.

    KINDERGARTEN CIVICS STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    recognize the important actions required in demonstrating citizenship: respecting roles of members and leaders in a group; sharing responsibilities in a group; identifying ways to help others; respecting the individual right to express an opinion; and acknowledging that people think and act differently.

    discuss the attributes of a good citizen with emphasis on trust, respect, responsibility, fairness, and caring.

    recognize patriotic symbols and activities: national flag; "The Star Spangled Banner"; and Pledge of Allegiance.

    KINDERGARTEN ECONOMICS STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    match occupations with simple descriptions of work.

    will identify basic economic concepts, including the difference between basic needs (food, clothing, and shelter) and wants (luxuries); and the practice of exchanging money for goods.

    Communication/Language Arts Standards



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    KINDERGARTEN READING STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    name all upper and lower case letters and identify the representative sounds.

    distinguish long and short vowel sounds.

    distinguish the initial and final sounds in single-syllable words. (example: pit/pat; bit/bat)

    describe how changing the first letter of a word changes the sound and meaning of the word.

    use pictures, illustrations, and personal knowledge to make and confirm predictions about stories.

    connect information found in stories to personal experience.

    identify and describe characters, settings, and key events.

    identify the role of both the author and illustrator.

    retell familiar stories using beginning, middle, and end.

    identify patterns of rhyming words. (example: poems, songs)

    describe how books, stories, poems reflect things people do.

    note similarities and differences in various stories and poems.

    identify the characteristics of a variety of simple genres. (example: fairy tales, poems)

    recognize similarities in stories written by the same author.

    identify everyday print materials that provide information. (example: labels, newspapers)

    distinguish between "make believe" and "real" in print materials.

    identify the main idea in simple print materials.

    identify appropriate sources of information to answer specific questions. (example: weather forecast, calendars)

    KINDERGARTEN WRITING STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    write upper and lower case letters as appropriate.

    use pictures and words to tell a story.

    retell or restate what has been heard or seen.

    recognize that words are used in a specific order in sentences. (example: subject-verb; Mary runs)

    use punctuation at the end of sentences.

    begin sentences with capital letters.

    write using left to right, top to bottom progression.

    create sentences or word representations to explain events.

    write notes to classmates and family members.

    use the writing process to generate stories about personal experiences. (example: a family trip)

    create illustrations which represent information. (example: a personal trip)

    identify how words are used for rhyme and repetition.

    explore how authors organize and sequence writing.

    gather information from pictures, books, and videos to enhance writing.

    share writing with others for revision.

    KINDERGARTEN LISTENING AND VIEWING STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    follow various one and two step directions.

    take turns in conversations and group situations.

    use appropriate volume and tone of voice when responding to others.

    recognize and respond to non-verbal signals. (example: expressions of excitement, disapproval)

    recognize the difference between true and false information.

    identify various sources of factual information.

    identify information that can be used on a personal basis. (example: 911, home phone number)

    explore what makes various audio or visual presentations appealing. (example: color, sound effects)

    use visual organizers to remember everyday information. (example: labels, calendar, helper charts)

    ask appropriate questions.

    restate what others say to demonstrate recall.

    use patterns to recall information. (example: alphabet song)

    KINDERGARTEN SPEAKING STANDARDS

    THE STUDENT WILL:

    retell an experience in logical sequence.

    use pictures when telling a story.

    participate in choral speaking and recite short poems, rhymes, songs, and stories with repeated patterns.

    use words to describe and name numbers, colors, size, shape, location, people, places, things, and actions.

    recognize and use correct grammar when speaking.

    follow simple rules for conversations: (example: taking turns, listening)

    use complete sentences when speaking.

    recognize that body movements and facial expressions represent feelings.

    identify ways the speaker can help others see and hear a presentation.




    South Dakota Science Standards

    KINDERGARTEN


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    KINDERGARTEN NATURE OF SCIENCE STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    actively participate in science activities.
    observe and ask questions about the world around them.
    show an interest in and willingness to investigate unfamiliar objects and events.
    use their senses and simple instruments to make observations. (example: magnifying glasses, balance scales)
    safely conduct simple experiments to answer questions.
    use non-standard units of measurement to compare objects.
    use scientific thinking skills.
    KINDERGARTEN PHYSICAL SCIENCE STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    use sensory descriptors to describe objects. (example: sweet, sour, rough, smooth)
    explore objects in terms of physical attributes.
    find similarities and differences of various objects.
    study water in solid and liquid form.
    observe physical changes in matter.
    explore magnetism, describe its effect on various materials, observe that magnetic force can pass through various materials and that some magnets have useful applications.
    describe the motion of various objects found in their world.
    explore vibration and sound.
    determine which of two objects is hotter or colder.
    explain how thermal energy can be produced from many other forms of energy.
    KINDERGARTEN LIFE SCIENCE STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    sort living from non-living things.
    describe the basic needs of living organisms.
    recognize similarities and differences in diverse species.
    compare size, shape and structure of living things. (example: grasses to trees, birds to mammals)
    describe changes that are part of common life cycles. (example: seed to flower to fruit to seed)
    recognize that offspring of plants and animals are similar, but not identical to their parents or one another. (example: pets and plants)
    explore ways in which organisms react to changing conditions. (example: animals’ coats change in the winter; people sweat in hot weather and shiver in cold weather)
    describe the flow of energy in a simple food chain.
    describe ways that plants and animals depend on each other.
    explore the habitat.
    explain the importance of conserving water or other resources at home and school.
    KINDERGARTEN EARTH/SPACE SCIENCE STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    explore how shadows are made.
    describe major features of the Earth’s surface. (example: rivers, deserts, mountains, valleys, oceans)
    compare rocks, soil, and sand.
    describe simple Earth patterns in daily life.
    describe what causes day and night.
    identify observable objects in the day and night skies.
    KINDERGARTEN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIETY STANDARDS

    STUDENTS WILL:

    recognize technology in school, home and community. describe ways technology makes life easier for people.
    care for the environment around the school.
    recognize ways to reuse various materials.
    explore how science helps bring water and energy to the home and school.
    identify how science is used to make everyday products. (example: paper, pencils, desks)


    All of this to be learned in about 3 months of school days.
    Am I crazy or is this teacher asking for the impossible??:eek:
     
  18. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    Feb 27, 2007

    Consider special education. Your son will benefit from speech therapy. Why dont't you talk to the resource teacher at your school? You may find that special ed. is helpful. Maybe he could go into a 1st grade special ed. class. Just do not rule it out. Terry G.
     
  19. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Personally if it was my son, I would sign the paper to let him be tested for special education. Doesn't mean he will be in special ed. Also, is he receiving Speech and Language at school? He should be, and you should have had a PET on that.
     
  20. musikisme

    musikisme New Member

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    Feb 27, 2007

    Kindergarten

    Hi, I have been reading the post and wanted to add, if I may. I have taught kindergarten and have taught first grade, and now preschool. I am in Tennessee and our standards are similar to South Dakota, after looking at them... Remember that it is not the teacher who is expecting the child to do all of these things. The standards are what is set forth by the state. I was under so much pressure as a Kindergarten teacher to meet those standards. Teachers who do not meet the standards (especially new teachers) are expected to do these things or they could be without a job. I was under lots of stress with 5 full days to teach... I can't even imagine only having 5 days in two weeks to get all of this in. I just thought it may be helpful to understand the stress that she MUST be under.. To add to that stress, each school usually has grade level teams that expect the students to know things coming into the next grade. In our state, first grade standards can be completely overwhelming. Some schools and teams ask their teachers to go above and beyond the state standards (especially in Kindergarten/Preschool) so that the foundation is better for first grade. As an early childhood specialist, I will tell you that any additional help your child can get now, will give him such a strong foundation for his future. There are many resources online that offer small quick ideas for those "wasted minutes" that can be a great asset. I would like to tell you to get as involved as you can in your child's classroom (without being overbearing) and really get to know the teacher. MOST early childhood teachers are very caring people. I see teachers who cry everyday over situations with children. I know that some suggest that you talk to the principal, but before you do that, I would like to ask that you talk to the teacher, with an open heart and mind. I know that she will appreciate you talking to her first. If, after you talk to her, feel that she isn't doing what she should, THEN go to your principal and try to sit down together. The suggestion to go to a first grade classroom is a wonderful one. When you do, be sure and ask for the teacher with the most expectations for her children. You want to see what the best has to offer and see if you think your child is ready for this step. I hope that this helps you in some way.
     
  21. GoehringTeaches

    GoehringTeaches Comrade

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    From what I've read about your situation, the teacher is trying to help. She realizes that he does have so much that he still needs to learn in a shorter amount of time. Any extra help from outside the regular ed. classroom will benefit him in achieving all of those state standards that you listed. Also, she's sending a warning out to you that where he is now is not up to par with the state standards and if he can't catch up, then he will have to repeat. It's a hard pill to swallow but I have two or three newer students to my classroom and I'm trying to give them as much time as possible to catch up on their own. In the end, however, they may have to end up repeating simply because they can't get it all in a shorter amount of time.

    I've seen Kindergarten schedules like that, but it's definitely not as beneficial as all day everyday Kindergarten.
     
  22. Reading Guru

    Reading Guru New Member

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    I am not understanging why your child is only attending school 2 0r 3 times a week. He needs to be in school every day! Most children are not being seen as special ed, if they are having reading difficulties. The problem was that he needed to know is letters and sounds before entering kindergarten or somewhere soon after. I would get him a reading tutor immediately someone who is familiar with Reading Recovery strategies. 90 minutes a day of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, comprehension and writing. Reading and writing works hand-in-hand. Also, buy books by Harvey, Pearson, and Fountas and Pinnell. Also, dolche lists are free on-line. A-Z books is a great place too. My favorite interactive site for kids for reading, writing is starfall.com---unbelieavable.
    Good luck, and don't go for the label!
     
  23. teachK5

    teachK5 New Member

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    Hope this will help!

    As a second year Kindergarten teacher in Virginia who had a student much like your son last year I hope I can give you some insight as to what you can or should do. I cannot give you a perfect answer to this problem, but I hope I can give you a few tips. You sound like you are a VERY concerned parent who is willing to help your child in ANY way possible. The student I had last year had a terrible time in every subject and his mother would not retain him, he is now in first grade and is now facing being retained yet again, and has struggled terribly to get the most basic of first grade skills. He has now started to totally give up and just does not care about school at all. I would hate for your son to get in the first grade and struggle to the point where he gives up and never wants to try in school again. You may want to think of his situation in that direction - will he struggle too much and not be able to catch up? I do understand the age thing and maybe you need to go into the school and personally speak with the special educator and see what that teacher would suggest you do. I would also do like another person has already wrote; I would go to one of the first grade teachers in the school and ask them what you should do and possibly get a copy of their curriculum and see if maybe over the summer you could teach your son some of the skills he needs to know. To me it kind of sounds like the teacher he has was so used to having the number of students she had and may be already set in her ways and may even have a lot of students who are advanced and has given up on your son before he even had a chance. But, in her defense, it is terribly hard to find the time in the day to teach all of the skills we are expected to teach and still remediate with the struggling students. Our school has a reading program where we have to see every one of our struggling students in a small group setting every day. The lessons we do with them are skill-based and are set up to basically rememdiate what they need and to SLOWLY introduce them to the new skills being taught in the whole group session. Is his school a Title I school? If so these services are GREAT (at least at my school they are) and may be a great avenue for him.
    I hope this will help a bit.
     
  24. teachK5

    teachK5 New Member

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    As for this the standards for us in Virginia are the blueprints for what we teach. If the class can go past those then we will do that. Example: we have to be able to count to 30 by 1's, 5's, and 10's. Well my class is doing all of this to 100 because they can actually do it and it challenges them a bit more. Our goal is to have each child master the set SOL's and then if they can go on that is even better! I think your school district has it ALL WRONG with their schedule!!!!!! All day every day is the ONLY way (I think) to be able to cover all it is we are supposed to cover! I really think the schedule is working against your son at this point - they (none of the students in that kindergarten) actually have a good routine. Iti is easy for a child at that age to forget how to sct 100% of the time when they are not in that setting everyday!
     
  25. bbride

    bbride New Member

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    A mother's story - 6 years later

    You have some great points about 1/2 day kindergarten. The amount of "stuff" that the students are expected to learn is amazing. On the other hand, they are expecting ALL the kindergarten students to learn that amount of stuff. If your son doesn't master the skills this year, then 1st grade will be MUCH MUCH harder.

    I just want to tell you about my experience. I have four children. When it came time for my third child to go to Kindergarten, I knew something about her was different. Katie struggled in Kindergarten, first grade, 2nd grade.....etc. She has struggled every year. Here we are at 6th grade, now. She is now several years academically behind her peers.

    I look back now, and wish someone had suggested that Kathryn repeated Kindergarten. If we had mastered the skills that she should have learned there, then Katie would have a much better off today.I was worried about her begin alienated from her peers if I kept her back. But in reality, she is already alienated from her peers, because she can't keep up with them academically.

    I have now (six years too late) had Kathryn tested for special education. She has a learning disability. I'd do almost anything to have those 6 years back again. Special ed doesn't mean dumb. It just means they learn differently from other kids.

    Another thought, if your son does qualify for special ed, then by law, you are part of the education team. You have to be part of making the decisions.(The IEP individual education plan is put together by teachers, administrators and PARENTS) Think of this as an opportunity for you to have a bigger voice in his education.

    Bobette
     
  26. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    It's a program some schools use. I personally don't like it. I worked at a school last year where on Mondays the group one came in the morning and group two in the afternoon. Than Tuesday and Thursday group one was there all day (group two did not attend school), Wednesday and Fridays Group two attended school while group one stayed home. Than there were two other classrooms that students either came Monday to Friday morning or afternoon session.
    Students who came to school every day even though it was a half day seemed to be more prepared for first grade.
     
  27. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    I hate the half time kindergarten too and wished he could go everyday. But when he is at home with me I am working and playing games with him almost 4 hours out of the day. I also have a 1 year old, so my 6 year old cant have me 100% of the time.
    Since I drive my son and 3rd grader to school everyday, going to pick him up at lunch time would be unreasonable with a 1 year old to tote around, plus we live 3 miles out of town. Thats a lot of driving!
     
  28. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    How come the school doesn't provide a bus?
     
  29. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Our 1st graders have a regular primer day one that they have to be reading. I can't imagine kindergarten not being all day. We have shifted down to the point that what they are learning in K is what we used to get in 1st and sometimes 2nd. It's a high pressure grade. (I was SHOCKED when I saw what our kindergarten was having to require.)
     
  30. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    There's bus service available and we could have gone that route. But Jack is getting settled in his class, should I put him in the other class where he would go everyday (half day)? I'd hate to uproot him. The question is.. do the positives outweigh the negatives enough to make such a change? What are your thoughts?
     
  31. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    Okay, I talked to my husband and then my child about changing over to the other kindergarten class. He would go everyday until noon or so, not exactly sure what time he would be excused. It would give Jack a new teacher (hopefully a more relaxed one that has more experience) although I realize the expectations will still be high. I hope giving him a daily routine will be to his advantage. Jack said he would like to change classes because he has a good friend in that class. So now..... I guess I need to talk to his teacher about how to go about this.
     
  32. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    I would make an appointment to talk with the Principal and the teacher together.
     
  33. jaszmyn

    jaszmyn Comrade

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    Feb 27, 2007

    yeah i think the teacher is simply just trying to let you know instead of waiting to the end of the year and uh oh! Yeah the standards are pretty high. Especially when entering first grade. It may not be the same type of environment. Not only do the children hav eto meet the standards they have to master them.. So messing up on one or two numbers when counting to twenty would simply not be good enough when it comes to first grade. The standards are rigurous due to standardized testing in first grade adn beyond.

    I would meet with the teacher and definatley let her know tha tyou are on her side and whats best for you child too. Come up with a plan and some accomadations for meeting his needs. Maybe seek a afterschool outside tutor or something.

    Good luck
     
  34. Commartsy

    Commartsy Companion

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    Feb 28, 2007

    Plus, if you are able to go the 1/2 day, every day route, when your little guy gets home, it's probably about time for the baby to go down for nap? That would be a great time to curl up with him and a good book. Never underestimate the power of reading to your kids, no matter what their age!
     
  35. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    I don't have time to read all of the responses right now, but the teachers on this board are amazing and have offered great advice so far, I'm sure.

    One thing I wanted to say is that if your son really doesn't need special ed, the testing will show that. Don't be hesitant to test him...you may get some very useful information, about both his strengths and weaknesses, and so may the teacher. It could help both of you learn how to work better with him!

    Another thing I wanted to say...some of the things you mentioned that he can do already are goals for the end of Pre-K here. For example, we expect perfect counting from 1-20, no mistakes, and we also expect all letter names, both upper and lower case...by the end of PreK. Additionally, here, if we have any inkling that we want to retain a child, we have to formally notify the parents and the principal by March 1. We can always change our minds and send the child forward, but if we don't go through that formal notification process, then we are not allowed to retain that child, period. So, maybe the teacher is approaching this as a "just in case."

    Kim
     
  36. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    Since Jack goes to K on Mon and Thur and every other Wed, that leaves us with alot of extra time. So I'm setting him up for additional speech therapy (outside of school) and I also Sylvan Learning Center in our town. They're expensive, but my little guy is worth it. I'll sell our extra car if it means getting him caught up! I just want him to grow into his middle childhood enjoying reading and overall learning. :love:
     
  37. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    If you get your son tested for special ed. you may be able to get speech therapy for free provided by the school. If your child needs speech therapy he may qualify at the public school. Get the special education testing done if you can. It may help and he may get an IEP that would help him get speech therapy. You should not have to pay for this. Terry G.
     
  38. momtothree

    momtothree Rookie

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    I signed the papers today to go forth with the testing, they probably will start next week. I'm positive he'll qualify to get services including speech but I thought maybe getting him some extra therapy on his days off from school would help him along even more.
     
  39. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    I think you are doing your best to give him the extra help he needs.
    I hope he succeeds. Let us know how the testing comes out. Terry G.
     
  40. mulchinmom

    mulchinmom New Member

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    To Momtothree

    Hello....I am a kindergarten teacher and although I would not hold your son back (especially since he will be 7!), I would be somewhat concerned that he does not have an understanding of the months, year, and other calendar aspects. By first grade your son should have an understanding of these things, as well as being able to skip count at least to 20. If the teacher feels he might be a candidate for special education, you better listen! As a teacher, I would encourage you to spend as much time in the classroom to see how your son is doing and work closely with the teachers and other support staff members to make sure your son does not have academic challenges that you are not seeing. Has he been refered for testing? If so, what have the counselors said? You have not revealed whether the teacher has extablished alternative assessments or refered him for special ed. testing. It might be wise to listen to your teacher. We spend a lot of time with the students and are able to spot problems that sometimes parents might be unwilling to recognize themselves. Be open to what the teacher is seeing in your son.


     
  41. mulchinmom

    mulchinmom New Member

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    Feb 28, 2007

    By the way, our special education students are also very sweet and are not necessarily immature. They just need slternative ways of learning and smaller class sizes in many instances. Keep in mind, most special education students are mainstreamed into regular educ. classes for part of the day.
     

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