Help - reluctant 5th grade readers

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by abby1966, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. abby1966

    abby1966 Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 29, 2006

    I have 24 5th graders. In the county in which I teach it is mandated that the last 30 minutes of the day is called DEAR time (Drop Everything And Read). The kids are suppose to read for the last 25 to 30 minutes of each school day. The unfortunate thing is that out of my 24 students I have about 2 who will actually pull out a book and read. The rest do not like to read even though they have I also have a party for those students who met their Accelerated Reader Point goals each quarter. These students can be very distracting to the other students and I make them get out a book to read but you know of course they are not reading because I am continuously having to call them down. Any suggestions?????
     
  2.  
  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Dec 29, 2006

    Do you read aloud to them daily for at least 20 minutes? This has motivated more reluctant readers for me than I could have guessed. The read-aloud must be purely for enjoyment, no assignments or expectations but to enjoy it.
     
  4. abby1966

    abby1966 Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 29, 2006

    Yes, I do read to them daily and they all seem to enjoy being read too. It's just aggravating that they don't care to read on their own.
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Dec 29, 2006

    It is aggravating. I have a tiny class and 5 out of the 7 kids love to read. I am in my glory when I have soft music playing and the kids are sprawled on the floor with pillows enjoying their books.
     
  6. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 29, 2006

    That's a great idea about having them sprawl out on the floor to read. When you think of it, when we read at home, we don't read in an umcomforable chair at a table. We read on our beds, or couches, or a big soft chair. Maybe you can have them choose where to read? That may motivate them to read. Of course, you'll have to lay down some rules, no talking with friends, etc, otherwise they loose their privilage of wher eto sit.
     
  7. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    7,775
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 29, 2006

    Does it have to be a book, or can they read a magazine? That might be more enjoyable to some. Give them a variety to choose from and when they are done, they can share with others.
     
  8. LionPride

    LionPride Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 29, 2006

    Are your students reading books that they can comprehend? Or do they just read anything? Students need to have books that they enjoy reading and that they have success reading also. I try to get to know my students as readers. I take a reading inventory at the beginning of the year and then meet with them (conference) to see what they are reading. If they are having trouble choosing a book, I will ask them what kinds of books they enjoy reading or topics they enjoy.
    My students (fifth grade) read for about 30 minutes. Two days a week I spend time conferencing with students and the other three days I do a mini lesson relating to reading. (fact and opinion, main idea and details, sequencing etc) Students keep independent reading logs and response journal for their reading. Sometimes I let students share what they are reading to get others interested in books.
    When we go back after the break, I plan on doing some little book talks about some of my favorite books and have them for the children to read if they would like. I also usually have books relating to science and social studies topics for them to read.
    Let me know of this helps.

    Kelly
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Dec 30, 2006

    Could the problem be with the reading material they have on hand? I have no background in 5th grade reading, but maybe people who do could offer some titles as suggestions?
     
  10. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    7,775
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 30, 2006

    That's what I was thinking, Alice. I would think that most kids would love to read a good magazine of interest. Don't kids that age have special interests and you could supply them with a variety of magazines? That's READING...does it have to be a BOOK? What do you think about that idea, Abby??? Why not ask the kids what they would like to read? Get some newspapers and have them read current events. Sounds like they need some stimulation.
     
  11. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    1,217
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2006

    I do a 'book/magazine sell' as I call it about twice a week at the end of my morning meeting. I take this time, to talk, for only about 5 minutes, about a new magazine or some book I think the kids might like. I usually show the book/magazine and read a short excerpt. I'm amazed at how popular these titles are during our DEAR time.
     
  12. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,070
    Likes Received:
    1,886

    Dec 30, 2006

    Most of the students in my Student Support Centre would rather do just about anything other than read! I have managed to entice most of them with a few things--lots of non-fiction books, magazines (sports, cars (be sure to browse these first, though), science, nature), graphic novels, anime, books on tape, newspapers, and comic books. In the new year I will also be adding some travel magazines and brochures and computer game manuals.
     
  13. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    7,775
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 30, 2006

    How terrible that kids don't want to read! I can't imagine what else they think they are going to do in school, but read! I guess every class is different. Last year I had a bunch of eager learners and this year most of them are just plain lazy.
     
  14. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    7,775
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 30, 2006

    Would it be possible or feasible to give those reluctant readers a choice of doing a "worksheet" or writing activity OR reading? I would have to be finding a way to make them want to read and giving a less-than-fun alternative.
     
  15. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,610
    Likes Received:
    52

    Dec 30, 2006

    If students are allowed to read magazines, supply them with things that interest them (skateboarding, sports) and maybe you can even get them donated somehow. I have had great success with comics like Garfield, Calvin and Hobbes (awesome vocab!) and Foxtrot. I also supply books like Matt Christopher sports themed books for general reading.
     
  16. 5thgraderocks

    5thgraderocks Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2006

    Here's another thought! I've found that many kids prefer to read short magazine articles that they can start and finish in 20 minutes. Time for Kids and Scholastic News are really great ... but getting expensive! I had an "Aha" moment one night when a movie I was watching ended abruptly with "To Be Continued." It occurred to me that maybe kids feel that way about putting down their books on command. It's certainly not scientific research, but it's worth a try to pull in your reluctant readers.
     
  17. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Dec 30, 2006

    But, then, you still have 5th graders who can't sustain attention long enough to read a novel.
     
  18. 5thgraderocks

    5thgraderocks Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2006

    You're right Upsdaisy! A comic strip even!! :angel:
     
  19. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    7,775
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 30, 2006

    I buy stacks of magazines at garage sales...Scholastic is one and National Geographic for example.
     
  20. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    5,363
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2006

    What is extremely difficult for me is that I have rarely any time allotted for the HOMEROOM class to silent read. Students either do it during Morning Work or when we have extra time after field trips... or on half days. I feel like I am not doing my best at giving my students time to read this year.

    I mentioned homeroom class... we level for reading at my school. Now, my reading students are a bunch of motivated readers. They're obsessed with AR/Reading Counts. It's probably because I teach the Gifted/Enrichment/Advanced bunch. Six from my homeroom are in there... yet for my other fourteen homeroom students, they go other places... and I don't know what they are doing in other rooms for silent reading time.
     
  21. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    5,363
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2006

    I have a reading portfolio for my class in January... and I put comic strips in there because that's still reading. They're going to practice FCAT skills in all kinds of ways this year. :)
     
  22. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,100
    Likes Received:
    139

    Dec 30, 2006

    When I taught 5th grade I was also required to have 30 minutes of DEAR time a day too. I had one students job as my helper and when they had their turn they would prep my room at the end of the day. So every 24 days they would know they could get a break. Also, I made them HAVE their DEAR book before we went on our last break, which for me was usually lunch. So, there was no going to the bookshelf or blah blah blah. Also, I made the DEAR a grade for the gradebook. Sometimes, kids hold it more valuable knowing they are held accountable. Maybe send home a weekly grade that their parents have to sign so they know how their child is spending their reading time at school.

    Good luck. It is hard. Hang in there.
     
  23. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,764
    Likes Received:
    325

    Dec 30, 2006

    What has helped some of my reluctant readers is to get to be the first to try out a new book I bring to class. Also, when I place a Scholastic order I get input from the kids. For read-alouds I sometimes read the first book in a series, and then have the other books available for independent reading.
     
  24. jitterbug2

    jitterbug2 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 31, 2006

    Scholastic also has books on Independent reading time. They have activities that the kids have to do on the books that they have been reading. I just bought them for myself and plan on starting it in my class after the break. I'm thinking I'm going to make it a weekly grade.
     
  25. Jame

    Jame Comrade

    Joined:
    May 23, 2006
    Messages:
    483
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 1, 2007

    Abby, I know exactly what you are talking about, and how frustrating it can be to motivate 5th graders to read. It is even more so if you love to read yourself! It is like, "Somebody, please punish me and make me read a book!!" :)

    I used to struggle daily with my students, too. In fact, one of my favorite stories is of the time I made one of my girls move away from another girl because they had been talking instead of doing their reading. She was pretty angry with me! She moved, sort of flinging herself down in front of our library shelves. The next time I looked up, she was holding up a book for me to see...the title??? Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade I couldn't help myself; I had to laugh, and so then did she. :D

    What I started doing that has really lit a fire under my students is to get multiple copies of books. Then, the students form groups of two or three, usually, to read the chosen book. Groups of four sometimes work, depending on the students, but I have had no luck with groups larger than that. They read the book together, and then each take an Accelerated Reader test over it.

    It has been wonderful to see them get so excited over what they read, to see them spontanously discussing the book as they read or laugh together over a certain part. Best of all is when they come up to me to clarify a part they didn't understand or to share a part that touched them in some special way. They also talk about their books with students in other groups, and we have waiting lists for some books! Guess, there just is no better way to enjoy a book than to share it with someone else! :)

    I also do a Lunch Bunch reading group. I choose a book, and then students who wish to, sign up for Lunch Bunch. As a group, they decide how many pages they will read independently before each meeting. We meet over lunch on Mondays and Thursdays to discuss what they have read. They usually read about 20 pages for each meeting, and it takes about three weeks to finish a book. It has really worked well to generate excitment in reading.

    Good luck, Abby! :angel:
     
  26. ITeach4Him

    ITeach4Him Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 1, 2007

    Our local newspaper prints a kids section each Sunday and in it they print a folk story or fable. I've been cutting them out and putting them on construction paper and laminating them. I have a bucket full of them and the kids read these when they have spare time (I don't teach Reading). My students like to read them because they are short, 1 page, and they don't feel like they are being forced to read a book. Just a thought...
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 152 (members: 0, guests: 133, robots: 19)
test