HELP! Questions regarding the salary table

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by Calif Student, Jul 16, 2007.

  1. Calif Student

    Calif Student Rookie

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    Jul 16, 2007

    I truly need some help/advice from the veteran teachers!!!!!!!

    Although I've had no complaint about my current employer (the district), I've decided to look elsewhere for next year.

    And I did find one that is just perfect, in terms of the monetary compensation and the distance from my house.

    So I turned in the resignation letter to my current school principal before the deadline 6/30 and took on the new offer.

    Well, as I went to the new district's HR office to get processed last week, came to find out that they do not honor my previous two years of teaching experience because I was only under "intern credential", not "preliminary, professional clear, or life credentials".

    That was a big shock! My previous district did recognize them and had no problem at all with placing me on Step 3 for next year. Now, I'd be placed on Step 1 at the new school.

    The HR specialist was sympathetic with my concern. So she "kindly" told me that I could try negotiating it with the school Principal to see if he's willing to override it.

    I'm just not sure if it's even a good idea..............

    Okay, bottom line, even with this Step 1 placement, I still end up making $2000 more than my previous job. However, I just feel like I was being cheated out though.

    I guess as a newbie, there are still a lot of "technical stuff" that I don't know about.

    So.....any thought?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 16, 2007

    You're still making more money, though, right? I don't see how this is a problem.

    Lots of districts don't recognize out-of-district experience at all, clear credentials or otherwise.

    I think you still came out ahead on this one. I wouldn't fight it if I were you.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 16, 2007

    Salary is always negotiable- you should have had a firm salary offer though before you accepted the new job.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I have to disagree.

    In public schools, salary is not usually negotiable. Everyone follows the same salary schedule.
     
  6. Calif Student

    Calif Student Rookie

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    Jul 16, 2007

    Hummm....

    So, there are pro's and con's as to whether I should negotiate my salary or not.

    I haven't signed the contract with the new district yet. And my current school hasn't found my replacement, either.

    The point is.......Why didn't the new distrct specify it in the ad? that they don't recognize any prior teaching experience under Intern Credential.

    What's interesting is that......Later on, I found out a slightly different answer from another source that the district actually does honor years of teaching experience under Intern. However, you must intern in their own schools. That's why they purposedly did not disclose the exclusion statement in the ad because technically speaking, they do recognize years of service under Intern Credential. It's just that those years have to be with them, and not other schools.

    The only reason why I even bothered to get an "Intern Credential" is so that it's NCLB compliant. Otherwise, I could have taught under "Emergency Permit" and not needing to take 3 extra classes, making my academic life harder.

    Well, I guess I still have the option of staying at the current district. I just don't know if it's even worth it to start all over again at a new place. :(

    I'm just curious........Are there any other "loopholes" regarding the salary stuff that I should be aware of? maybe for future reference?

    Yes, I do know that everyone follows the same salary schedule in the same district, unless they offer some sort of "sign on bonus".
     
  7. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jul 16, 2007

    You might look up what the state laws are on accepting intern credentials. I know my state used to not recognize anything that was not public school teaching (meaning years at private and charter schools didn't count), but a law was passed some time ago requiring districts to count all years of experience. If there's no law against not counting, I wouldn't push it. Nobody goes into teaching for the salary anyway.
     
  8. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

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    Jul 16, 2007

    I would try to negotiate with the principal. May not work but better than nothing. You have a legitimate request so it's not like they will dismiss you out of hand. If it doesn't work then don't look back and just jump into the new job with gusto.

    At many districts they seem to offer better conditions to their own - but that also makes some sense to me, since they have more experience with you as well. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, ask the principal.

    Also, Cassie in NV, Nevada may be different but I believe the rule in CA is that all districts must honor a certain number of years experience (5 I believe, but I'm not sure). But, I guess they can find exceptions that allow them to ignore certain types of experience...
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 16, 2007

    NO in public schools there is some leeway in salary negotiation regarding what step you come in on...at least in my area...The superintendant has some control over the purse strings and can play a little with what steps new employees come in on depending on their experience, the position being filled, etc. as long as s/he can justify the step to the board...Once hired though you're right- you are pretty much moving on the scale as everyone else does except for plus credits...We hired someone this year who had 14 years experience but has been home for 8 years so the superintendant wanted to save some money and was playing with the new teacher coming in on step 5 (not step 14 which she left another district at 8 years ago...) ..I think the teacher negotiated step 7...it was a mid-year replcement, hard to fill and we really wanted the teacher...
    This doesn't seem like a loophole to me- they wouldn't post the salary in the paper because the salary could be different depending on who they hired...you really should have had a solid salary offer before you a)left your other job and b) accepted this job. Going back to your old job makes you look a little flighty and they may not take you back anyway- they could have already posted the job or filled it...was your only reason for switchng jobs the salary? If it was you should have defintely informed yourself better before burning your bridges behind you...
     
  10. DaveF

    DaveF Companion

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    Jul 16, 2007

    My vote would be to "take what you get and don't throw a fit." I wouldn't want to start a new job with a disagreement over a couple thousand dollars. However, your mileage may vary.
     
  11. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

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    Jul 16, 2007

    I'm not sure about in California but in Georgia the table is firm (As far as I know as a first year teacher) I'm a T-4 by Georgia's view point (meaning I have a bachelor's and a clear-renewable certificate) That means, in my county's view point, I start off making at least 38,080 a year.
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 17, 2007

    It's not that my table isn't firm - step one is step one...the superintendant has some flexibility though in what step to put you on depending on experience/education. Some teachers were hired years ago, had a masters and weren't given credit for it..I had mine, was hired with it and was put on the scale Step 1, Masters...
     
  13. Calif Student

    Calif Student Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Based on the info I received here and from other sources, I think the general rule is that once you're placed in the Salary Table, everyone has to follow the steps & columns. However, with regards to the initial placement, there could be some room for negotiation, especially when it comes to years of prior service. Some districts specify that they would only recognize up to xxx years of teaching experience; some say they would honor them all.

    It wouldn't hurt to talk to the Principal. The worst is a "No".

    If "Internship Credential" is considered NCLB compliant, then treat it as one. The District has to go through the Calif. Commission of Teacher Credentialing to verify that I am "highly qualified". Yes, I have the certificate stating so. I don't see why they can't count those 2 years of service when I taught under "Intern Credential". It is a very legitimate credential and I worked hard for it: taking extra courses, constantly being observed by peers, school administrators, and university supervisors/professors.

    I suppose the salary rule was established way before and back then many teachers were on "Emergency permits". It's black & white: credential or emergency. I can understand why the District wouldn't want to recognize those years of service under Emergency. But things have changed. Now, there are different types of credentials, "Intern Credential" being one of them.

    Mmm...Let's see how it turns out next week when I meet with him.

    (( Have my fingers crossed. ))
     
  14. ddb23

    ddb23 Companion

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    Jul 20, 2007

    You can negotiate your position on the salary table - the super can always override both the salary table and the license requirements for the position. I would imagine that the principal would give a recommendation to the superintendent who would then extend the waiver or the salary negotiation.


    Remember: a filled position is a lot easier to deal with than an empty one. If your position is hard to fill, you shoul dbe able to negotiate a little easier.


    db
     

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