Help please...new student - NO prescribed meds!!!

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by i_love_cooper, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. i_love_cooper

    i_love_cooper New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 22, 2007

    I got a new student in my first grade classroom this week who has severe ADHD. Her mother has told the school that she is having trouble getting the dr to get the necessary meds for her.
    The days were spent this week getting her to stay in her seat. She is very disruptive and does not listen 9 times out of 10. She wanders around the room and often lays on the floor making noises. She is very low functioning (as she does not know letters, can not write her name, does not listen to class discussions, etc).
    She is pulled from the room to go with the resource room teacher 30 minutes in the morning, 30 in the afternoon, OT, PT and speech once to twice a week. These pullouts only make it harder to settle back down to the quietness of our classroom.

    :help:I am at a loss at what to do in just a week's time. I guess I don't understand what the holdup of the meds are and what I can do for the time being. Several teachers have told me about setting a timer for every 5 mintues and putting up a sticker if she is on task. After so many stickers, a reward is earned. I have never had to do this with a student before in my 7 years teaching first grade. Any other ideas out there?

    Thank you so much!!!
     
  2.  
  3. funkychickenchi

    funkychickenchi Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2007
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 23, 2007

    Is the mom just saying that about the meds or does mom feel like you do? If mom feels the same way, search this board on caffeine and ADHD and present it as an option for now.
     
  4. jaruby

    jaruby Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 23, 2007

    It works! I had mild adHd (I was mostly hyper) while growing up and my doctor recommended "coffee no sugar" and it did help. Only issue is I still love me some coffe 20 years later :lol:

    Be careful not to use sugar products.
     
  5. tchecse

    tchecse Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 23, 2007

    ADHD meds require the parent to go to the dr. to get them refilled every month (trust me-I have to go myself!)....some docs require you to be seen, some just leave the script at the front counter. Not trying to play devil's advocate, but just wondering if mom has just been using this as an excuse because she hasn't gone to get the script or hasn't made the appt.
     
  6. i_love_cooper

    i_love_cooper New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 23, 2007

    I can say without a doubt that in this situation the mom is responsible for her not having her meds. Mom's story changed as to why she didn't get them 10 days ago and is now saying that it will be another 10 days! ARGH!!!!!

    Thanks for the tip on caffeine...I'll give that a search.
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 23, 2007

    Maybe you could try some alternative methods. Have her be your "runner" if you need something from the office. Ask her to help you pass out papers. Try to see if you can "find" some success in her. Compliment her on her jobs well done.

    I let some of my ADD / ADHD kids sit on exercise balls at their desk. This lets them bounce around but they're still sitting quietly. Also, you can rotate this "special seat" around so that different people get it (it just may happen to be her more often than not....) so that she doesn't stand out.

    I don't know if you have it available -- but in my classroom I have a trampoline. When the kids do a good job, get something right, have good behavior, anything "positive" in my eyes, I say "go get 10 jumps!" and they bounce 10 times. Sometimes we even do trampoline time during word wall, a bounce for each word, or during math, count your bounces by 2s, 5s, 10s, etc. This might be something you could ask the OT at your school if you could borrow just until things get sorted out.

    Think about how you can make your teaching more "active" - this totally helps these little pogo sticks.

    I also have used fidget balls (stress balls, funny little squishy balls with funny things sticking out of them, some of them light up, the dollar store is a great resource) -- and as long as they are quiet, and somewhat paying attention/not distracting others... I don't mind if they fidget with it. Another idea is putting velcro on the desk. Fuzzy strip on one side and pokey strip on the other. This helps keep their little hands busy. Another thing you could ask your OT for is a weighted vest, or hand weights. This helps "ground" kids and keep them a little bit more still (if that's possible).

    Another thing that has been helpful for me is a visual schedule. This might be helpful for her to know WHEN she is allowed to bounce around and laugh and be silly and make noises. Maybe her schedule could say 9:00-9:45 Spelling Activities, 9:45-9:55 Break. Sounds like she has an IEP if she is pulled out - you might want to get "frequent breaks" put into her IEP. The funny thing is, a lot of people see "frequent breaks" as a big negative in the classroom because it takes time away from academics. But, the thing is, if you can get a good thirty to forty five minutes out of them, and then you lose ten, in order to get another good forty five... it's worth it in the end.

    Has she been tested for other things? Not knowing letters, not being able to write her name, these do not sound like typical ADHD symptoms - unless her hyperactivity has caused her to miss so much instruction that she has been left in the woods... Something also to consider is sometimes when kids are either TOO challenged or bored, academically, they might act out. You said she did not participate in discussions, know her letters, etc. Maybe a different disability is causing her to be behind her peers academically, thus causing her acting out.

    Not being able to join in / listen to class discussions DOES sound like a symptom of ADHD. But, I would have her tested for maybe any other disabilities. It seems odd that she would be considered "low functioning" and only have ADHD.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Sep 23, 2007

    We've all been there. Many many parents are very reluctant to medicate their kids-they've heard stories, read on the internet, talked to friends. I'm not sure what the hold up is with the doctor but they could have one who is reluctant to prescribe as well, or doesn't believe it's ADHD or they could just be telling you that to cover the fact that the parents don't want to medicate. You can do a few things: 1. Call in a special ed person or child study team resource from your building to observe. The more data you can collect the better. 2. Accommodate as much as you can. ADHD is a disability. The behavior is not all under the child's control. Be as understanding as you can, positively reinforce the 'good behaviors' the child does exhibit. The sticker charts your friends are suggesting is called 'positive discipline'...Try this link for some ideas: http://members.tripod.com/~preschoolresource/discipline.html 3. Remember always that this little person is the light of his/her parents' eyes. Get the parents on your side. Invite them in to volunteer in your room so they can see firsthand what the expectations are in your grade level. You also want them to see you as a caring professional who only wants the best for their child. :love:
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 418 (members: 1, guests: 399, robots: 18)
test