HELP! My child is too advanced for Kindergarten!

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by ErscmMaine, Nov 16, 2005.

  1. earthmommy2003

    earthmommy2003 Rookie

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    Nov 20, 2005

    I already stated that. He doesn't want to play outside, watch TV, etc. The only time I can get him away from the table is when I have him on educational websites on the computer.
    I was a gifted child. This statement you made about your son was me. From the other side of the coin, as an adult I can tell you that you aren't doing your son any favors by allowing him and even encouraging him to not play, watch TV, etc. "Gifted" children have other challenges. Your son will likely never have problems learning and functioning educationally. But, your statement tells me that he WILL eventually have a hard time functioning socially. "Normal" kindergartners want to play. They want to get messy. For lack of a better term: they want to giggle. Highly gifted children lose that ability to giggle. I never went to high school. My giftedness isolated me. I was a chronic runaway. I tried to commit suicide twice before I was 13 years old. I was a pregnant teen. I was a high school "drop out" (in quotes because I was never IN!). I just graduated with a 3.67 gpa with my BA.... even though I have 7 children and a full time job. Academics were always easy for me. When your son is a teenager and when socialization becomes more complicated, but he doesn't have the social skills necessary to learn how to function in groups of "average" people without sticking out like a sore thumb, when he doesn't have the popular culture references in his repetoire because he's never been much into television or music, when puberty hits and it's really too late to learn social intelligence, but he desperately wants to know how to fit in, yet that pretty girl he wants to take to the dance doesn't much care about recombinant DNA, when he starts to implode like TOO TOO MANY gifted pubescents do, and he's never learned to handle the boredom that comes from learning "too" easily, or how to accomodate his less academically gifted peers, are you really going to look back at his educational path and be happy with the choices you seem determined to make regardless of the years of experience the teachers in this thread have tried to impart to you? I am the voice of experience from the other side and, what's worse, research shows that my experience isn't all that unique. Gifted kids are at high, high risk. Focus on those things he doesn't usually do. I echo the importance of involving him in 4H, Boy Scouts, theater, music, dance, instrumentals, art. He likes academics? Fine. Teach him another language... or two. Learn about other cultures with him. Teach him to cook. But please, listen to the majority here. Please. Otherwise you and your son (mostly, your son) are likely to regret it.
     
  2. Carmen13

    Carmen13 Groupie

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    Nov 20, 2005

    Your testimony touched me earthmommy2003...
     
  3. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Nov 20, 2005

    The classrooms here are so tiny. That I am not sure that would work. I loved were I did my student teaching. We had plenty of room for everything! Including blocks. I really think I need to open a private school LOL.
     
  4. Ali

    Ali Companion

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    Nov 20, 2005

    Erscm... By reading your original post, I do not feel like you were asking for options on how to get him moved. It really sounded as if you wanted some advice on whether or not to do it. That may account for the types of responses you received. In closing, I'm sorry that you feel that the only person who showed support is the one who agreed with you. Most people who take the time to respond to a post are trying to lend support. I just think you were unclear about what you wanted.
     
  5. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Nov 20, 2005

    Either way, when posting in a forum and asking for advice, you have to be able to take the criticism along with the positive reinforcements. I would think it is something that is expected of any adult. We can't "choose" to hear what we want to hear and only be happy with the comments we agree with. We have to see things from both sides of the fence.
     
  6. ABall

    ABall Fanatic

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    Nov 21, 2005

    But Jen, some adults do just hear what they want to hear and thats the kind of person thats hard to talk to. They don't wan't advice they want someone to agree with them.
     
  7. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Nov 21, 2005

    I totally agree. That's why I posted my statement above. When posting on a forum such as this, either be it a parent or teacher, you have to be open minded and when you ask advice you need to be open to the criticism that comes along with it. You don't have to agree with it, but you do need to hear all sides and take consideration for others opinions. I guess to me it's more common sense and the adult thing to do...not that I don't have my childish moments;). We're all human:).
     
  8. sbtellmann

    sbtellmann Companion

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    Nov 22, 2005

    Not to sound bad, but this is an opinion forum. People are welcome to give their opinions, and as teachers, we are just trying to help you out with an informed decision either way you choose. They were just offering advice for you. :)
     
  9. sbtellmann

    sbtellmann Companion

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    Nov 22, 2005

    Grammy Teacher-
    I am SO jealous you have a chimney! How cool!
     
  10. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Nov 22, 2005

    My room is upstairs(we have 3 floors) ... so I have slanted ceilings on one side and in addition to my rather spacious room, there is this "little room", much like a crawl space. At this time it is part of our kitchen play area...it is so cool.
     
  11. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Nov 23, 2005

    As I read through this thread, I didn't notice the criticism that you speak of, just passionnate kindergarten teachers giving good information to you that you actually asked for. You are probably feeling attacked because you might be hearing things that you could possibly not want to hear. Whatever happens, I know that you will do what is in the best interest of your son because you know what is right for him. I think other than that, you need to address this with the teacher again and then perhaps the principal of your school if nothing happens with the teacher.
    I agree that keeping him in K for the rest of the year would be my choice if it were me, but... that's just me...
    I hope that you find the support you need to get what is best for your son.
     
  12. Mrs_Barrett

    Mrs_Barrett Cohort

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    Nov 30, 2005

    See if you can get him into other classes. I have had a 1st grader come to my kindergarten class for alphabet time, because he didn't know his letters yet. Last year we also had a Kindergartener go to 2nd grade guided reading. Check with the principal for sure!
     

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