Help! Middle school teacher and I broke my foot.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Georgia75, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. Georgia75

    Georgia75 New Member

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    Aug 19, 2010

    It's the first full week of school...I teach 8th gr. Social Studies (Georgia Studies) and I broke my foot in several places and tore some ligaments. I was ordered to stay home the rest of this week on Tues. and when I return I have to teach while seated and my foot elevated. I do not want to just give out handouts or something like that. Any ideas how to engage the students for 2 months while not being able to stand in front of the calss or move about the room? Anyone else been in this situation?:dizzy:
     
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  3. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Aug 19, 2010

    I taught from a wheelchair for several months. It's doable, you just have to get a little creative.

    Ask for help. Your students will rise to the occasion. Mine tripped over themselves to be able to help me with whatever I needed. My colleagues constantly asked what I needed and what I could get for me.

    Have them come to you, or arrange your classroom so you can get to them. Have a little fun with it (I joked about how I could only reach the bottom half of the white board.

    Get better soon!
     
  4. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

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    Aug 19, 2010

    I taught about a month while I was on crutches. I just used an elevated chair and an overhead projector so I didn't have to move much.

    mmswm is right, students will help so you can assign chores and they will gladly help.
     
  5. apple25

    apple25 Comrade

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    Aug 19, 2010

    Wow - I feel for you. You are in for some interesting challenges. I hope that you are not in too much pain.

    I would suggest that your students will rise to the occasion and want to help you out as much as possible. I think you will still be able to do a lot of creative stuff. Group work, presentations and hands-on activities should all still do doable . . . it will just be more difficult for you to move from group to group. Perhaps you could assign each group a specific job - one person could be the group leader and they shoudl try to mediate resolutions before coming to you to solve problems.

    Individual white boards instead of worksheets would be neat.

    Powerpoint presentations instead of writing on the chalkboard.

    I think how you set up the room will be key - make sure you leave lots of room so you can get to each student easily. It might mean that you'll have a large open space in the middle of the room and desks will be crowded together, but your students will understand!
     
  6. sweetlatina23

    sweetlatina23 Cohort

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    Aug 19, 2010

    I couldnt agree more with Marci and MMSWM, your best option is to assing student roles. You can get your teacher helper, a messenger, someone with good handwriting to write on the board if needed, etc. I would say have fun with it.

    If you have a projector maybe you can create most of your activities through powerpoints. The kids love visuals, make them colorful and it will help you get your thoughts across. Activities you can still do, just explain it well. If you have to ask your helpers to stay after school so you can teach them the activity and then they can explain it in class as a whole group.

    You are in my prayers, God bless you, I hope you feel better.
     
  7. kfhsdramaqueen

    kfhsdramaqueen Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2010

    I did it last year

    I broke my foot last September in 7 places, and in order to avoid surgery, I had to keep it as immobile as possible for 4 months. I am a klutz, so crutches were not an option. My doctor recommended a wheeled cart. It's basically like a walker with wheels. You bend your injured leg at the knee and kneel on this scooter thing and wheel down the hall. It made being mobile much easier, and once I got the hang of it, I got up some speed.;) I also lost fifteen pounds because it was too much of a pain to get up and get stuff.
    s
    My kids really helped out a lot. They alway volunteered to carry things or run errands. I used a wheeled chair in class to roll around the room if I absolutely had to move. I also run the drama program, so I would roll around the stage on a chair. I even did construction for two productions that way. My colleagues brought me lunch if I asked, and my administrators excused me from extra duties. It was a pain, but it was doable. Just slow down and take it easy. I only missed two days of school during that whole time. It can be done.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 19, 2010

    ONe of our most incredible social studies teachers taught a number of years ago, flat on his back, lying on a beach towel. He had pulled his back out, and the only way he could find relief was flat on his back.

    Fortunately for you, you teach history, not math. There's no reason for you to have to be up at the board; you can use power point and have your notes pre-outlined. Sit down, and either use a remote control to move the slides, have them go automatically (I know there IS a way, though I know next to nothing about power point.) or, worst case scenario, have a kid stationed there to move the slides.

    Hang in there.. the rest of the year is bound to be an improvement!

    Feel better!!
     
  9. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Aug 19, 2010

    One of my favorite math teachers (while I was in high school) had to sit in a chair while teaching since she was tiny thing and was pregnant. She did an amazing job with using a overhead projector-- she sat facing her students and would write down notes on the overhead. It was never a problem for us :)

    Plus teaching should be about your STUDENTS doing the work, not you :D

    Feel better soon!!!
     
  10. Georgia75

    Georgia75 New Member

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    Aug 19, 2010

    THANKS to each of you for all the suggestions! My main goal is to follow Dr's orders so as to heal as wuickly as possible and STILL be able to have engaging and fun lessons for my kids without being in dire pain. I really like the idea of the powerpoints. I just got a smart board so once I learn to use that, it will help I am sure. I think I will put my rolling chair in the front of the room with a (empty) student desk to prop my foot up on and utilize helpful students as much as possible. Keep the suggestions coming! I am glad I found this site...how helpful!
     
  11. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Aug 19, 2010

    I did a lot of wheeling around in an office chair when my arthritis flared up in my ankle last year. The kids were great about it, although I did have a TA that could spot trouble and stop it if I couldn't get there fast enough.
     
  12. agsrule!

    agsrule! Companion

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    Aug 21, 2010

    If you want engaging lessons, allow the students to use the smartboard. They will figure it out before you do. And everyone will be anticipating a turn. Search the smartboard website for your topic/subject and download some things to do with your class.
     
  13. allisonbeth

    allisonbeth Comrade

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    Aug 21, 2010

    A friend of mine was a high school teacher in a wheelchair. She arranged the room so she could easily get around. Her desks started a bit farther back because she wrote low on the board (no smart board). She used the overhead projector when she needed something up a bit higher. She rolled around the room and made room o she could get to every student if needed.

    Her kids were in charge of handing things out and putting them away. They learned on day one that helping out was appropriate. The students started out veing helpful because of the wheelchair but within a few days it was routine and the students did not "see" the wheelchair as much.

    One problem was firedrills. Administration set up a buddy system...a TA was available at all times to leave his class and come down to help with firedrills.
     

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