Help! LOTS of newcomers and non-readers

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by miss-m, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Sep 11, 2019

    I have 25 first graders this year... and 12 of them are Newcomers or Code 1 (low-English) and level 9 readers. I have a co-teacher, which is great, but we are at a bit of a loss for how to get these kids moving quickly. 5 of them are Newcomers, no English, no literacy skills in L1. So they are at literally ground zero and we are at like... spelling their name, letter formation, basic ABCs. The rest speak some English, but struggle a lot with letter ID and sounds, sight words, blending, etc.

    How do we get these kids moving FAST? I have a pre-A guided reading bundle I bought from TPT that is already proving to be helpful, but this is way more 9s than I'm used to. HELP.
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Sep 11, 2019

    I am sharing my most requested list of resources for Newcomers and ESL teachers to use. I keep them on the first page of the Free Links and Resources thread that is pinned in the General Education forum. You can usually find it easily if you click on the recent posts, but on page one you will find this list of resources clearly marked as ESL Links - they are found elsewhere in the thread, just not often found in this quantity lumped together. Hope that you find something here that may help you. Best of luck to you!
    • mastersinesl.com/leading-sources/
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
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  4. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Sep 12, 2019

    Wow, @vickilyn -- that is a TON of links!! Thanks!
     
  5. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Sep 12, 2019

    I might recommend that at this age, their brain is already processing at top speed, faster than modern computers. Unfortunately, our current education system often sets unrealistic standards and time frames to meet. The students are actually working at an advantage, however. Bilingual students are statistically at an educational advantage, which is why many schools now offer foreign language immersion. The Chinese immersion students in my district are not considered behind when they begin.

    The disadvantage that non-English speakers might encounter develop from other possible attacks on the brain, typical disadvantages that any student might encounter, not just immigrants.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
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  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Sep 12, 2019

    Most ESL teachers are familiar with the first two or three, but the NJ link for Newcomers, which talks about bilingual, is really quite good. My suggestion is to browse these links and take what will work in your situation.

    This may be a good start, after www.colorincolorado.org, of course:
    https://www.eslgamesplus.com/phonics-materials/
     
  7. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Sep 13, 2019

    The good news is that they are young. Younger level 1s tend to pick up speed faster than older students who are level 1. Students with certain first languages will take a lot longer to catch up than others as we are learning in my district. Students who come to English with Spanish as a first language pick up steam much faster than, say, students who come to English speaking Arabic or Farsi. Don't beat yourself up if some of your students take longer to get going. Does your school have an ELL teacher on site? One that comes to buildings on certain days? Keep in close touch with them. The links the vickilyn has posted are a good place to start. IF you need anything, feel free to PM me with questions.
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Sep 13, 2019

    Actually, the ones with no L1 literacy skills can be taught English phonics rules, and the letters by their English names/pronunciation with impunity. My experience, however, is that once you get working with them, you find that there is some L1 literacy to contend with. Additionally, there may be some L2 verbal skills in the BICS, acquired strictly by word of mouth, no reading skills involved. One of my most interesting students was bilingual in the verbal use of L2 and L1, but unable to read either. Raised in the US, moved frequently, meaning that the parents were able to keep the child out of school due to fear that the child would be removed from the home. The student was 9 before entering school. Teachers assumed that she could read the L2 because she spoke it so well, only to find no ability to read anything. I had her at about age 18 and she wanted to read better, but was still quite limited in the level she was able to use well. Very interesting!
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Sep 14, 2019

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