Help!!! Kids won't listen!!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by 773 Miles Away, Sep 9, 2011.

  1. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    Sep 18, 2011

    I'm not really familiar with Cornell Notetaking strategy. That was my question; what is it? Have you been trained in how to use/teach it?
     
  2. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    Sep 18, 2011

    Miss Froggie, how do you show the students that they have lost the time from their Halloween party? Do you keep track of it somewhere where they can see it? Thanks. These are all great ideas...
     
  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 18, 2011

    I used to teach AVID, and Cornell notes are a big part of the AVID philosophy. The AVID Summer Institute always has a few sessions about Cornell notes.

    There's lots of information online about Cornell notetaking benefits and strategies, especially if you also search for AVID stuff.

    What I like so much about Cornell notes is that when it comes to the actual class notes (the stuff that goes in the right column), students can write those however they like. They don't need to be formatted in any particular way, so students go with whatever is most helpful to them personally. Pictures, symbols, shorthand, bullets, narratives, whatever...it all works when it comes to Cornell notes. No one is dictating how to take the notes. Rather, in the Cornell system, the focus is on the summary and the left column of keywords and critical questions.
     
  4. stampin'teacher

    stampin'teacher Cohort

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    Sep 19, 2011

    I also have this dilemma with my students. I am at a non-punitive school, so I cannot take away time or objects, etc. They seem to also frown on a rewards system. I'm not sure how students should be expected to intrinsically want to be on task and ready when they don't see some type of positive outcome.
     
  5. Ambrosegirl84

    Ambrosegirl84 Companion

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    Sep 19, 2011

    I'm not a fan of using material incentives, as the schools I've seen that use them seem to end up with students having a "what do *I* get for being nice?" mentality, furthering the "it's all about me and what I get" mentality, which of course, students naturally have but need to be discouraged from, as is shown by the way my generation (the 20somethings and younger) is turning out...but that's a whole 'nother discussion...

    However, I don't have the foggiest idea how you're supposed to teach students anything if there are no consequences for bad behavior. If students know that they can choose to do crappy work, behave poorly, etc., and have no consequences at home or school, then why wouldn't they?

    My students do lose recess time as a consequence for poor behavior or work, and get praise and smiles as rewards for above-and-beyond good behavior. I do give them a sticker in their sticker book for well-done, 100 percent papers, but they are expected to be on their best behavior--no material rewards from me!

    Of course, my students would also have consequences at home were they to get in trouble....which they haven't, since they know they'd have consequences at home...the perks of a one-room school...

    To get more on topic...I agree that some "stand on your head" ideas could rile up the kids more, but if the main problem is wandering minds, I would try at least a few unpredictable things now-and-then to keep their interest up. Have them finish your sentences. Make really silly mistakes for them to catch, then give a high-five or "Right on, (name)!" to the kid that catches the mistake. Have the kids pat themselves on the back for getting questions right or filling in the right information. Maybe you could read aloud what they should have in their notes, and have them chorally read the notes back to you??

    I have my kids find 3 things periodically in what we are reading and either write them down, share with a partner, or tell me.
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Sep 19, 2011

    I think there are great posts here for some excellent ways to make your lesson more intrinsically motivating. Sounds like that is what your school wants. The End of Molasses Classes: 101 Extraordinary Solutions...by Ron Clark has the most amazing ideas I've ever seen in being creative in a classroom. This $10-$15 book is really helpful and also is probably free at your library.

    Kevin
     
  7. stampin'teacher

    stampin'teacher Cohort

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    Sep 19, 2011


    Yes...this is my dilemma! What makes it worse is that the parents are like this also. They love that it's a non-punitive school, because they don't give consequences either! You can see that these kids run the show at home. Currently I'm not backing down on my power struggle-every other teacher each year gives in because the group has such a reputation. (I say power struggle but I really mean having a respect for the teacher, which I don't think they've ever really had given all I've heard)

    I know they have it in them, and I've talked to them several times about how even THEY say they are so much more productive when they are on task and listening.

    I like the "try something random to get their attention", but with this group, they take that as the "ok" for a free for all. If I make a joke or do something to get their attention, they automatically think it's ok for them. This particular group is VERY me me me...

    I am going to implement a reward system as a class-they can earn minutes to be used for free time (reading, time outside, etc.). They love going outside (and they need it), and they have to work as a class to get it. No one has explicitly stated I can't do that, and I'm hoping when admin sees a positive result, it will be allowed. :whistle:

    Part of the reason they hired me was because of the school I came from-very focused on academics and structure. I'm thinking now they thought "oh good, we'll throw her in there and she'll fix the class" :dizzy:
     

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