Help!!! Kids won't listen!!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by 773 Miles Away, Sep 9, 2011.

  1. 773 Miles Away

    773 Miles Away Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 9, 2011

    Literally they will not listen..... Not one bit!! We were taking notes today and kids were playing with their pencil boxes, whispering to eachother, doodling, fidgeting with stuff in their desk, staring off into space, and doing everything BUT listening!! It was a short 15 minute whole group lesson.

    How can I teach them how to listen?? (5th grade inner city) ugh so frustrating..... I agree it's important to do small groups, but how can I get through my intro lesson so that we can actually get into groups! Yikes...

    Any help would be appreciated :)

    By the way, we are an incentive free school so I'm not allowed to give tickets, or stamps, or anything, to encourage good behavior.
     
  2.  
  3. jlj

    jlj Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,156
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 9, 2011

    Could you have them on carpet instead of at desks for whole group lessons? You would then have the option of sending them to their seat if disruptive.
    If they need to be at their desks then maybe try turning their desk around when caught playing in it & moving their desk when disruptive.
    Ignore as much as you can while giving a lot of attention & praise to those you do catch listening, working, following directions, etc. & point out what they're doing correctly. That will usually get others to straighten up to get the same positive attention.
     
  4. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 9, 2011

    I agree with JlJ. Also, how long are your lessons? My kids have a short attention span (being 1st graders and all), so I keep my lessons to about 10-15 minutes, and then we change and they do something more hands on. I have a notoriously wild bunch of kids who behave just fine for me, but I think something that helps is not giving them a chance to get bored.
     
  5. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2011
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 9, 2011

    TamiJ, how in the world do you get anything accomplished in 10-15 minute lessons? I'm being totally serious too, no sarcasm here.

    Our lessons (for first grade!) are at a minimum of 25 minutes.... now I'm seeing why my kids have a horrible attention span! I've been wondering why they shut down after about 15 minutes into a lesson... that's why. I don't think my planning team plans for their attention spans... =/
     
  6. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 9, 2011

    Many teachers think it's impossible, but it isn't. It is doable. I seriously have everything planned to the minute to help me keep on my time. The thing is, after a certain point, your are talking but they aren't listening. You are teaching, but they aren't learning. I do whole-class for 10-15 minutes, then they do an activity to practice whatever it is we are doing, and I will pull a small group to work with closer to modify or give more support. It is very do-able, even though it seems like it isn't. Mini-lessons would be longer based on grade level to correspond with the attention span of the students.
     
  7. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,786
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 9, 2011

    My lessons are even shorter. I have one teaching point (in math, writing, reading workshop) and it takes about 7 minutes. Interactive Read Alouds take a bit longer because we stop and talk (altogether and in partners) periodically through the text.
     
  8. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 9, 2011

    Read up on brain research and you'll see it all makes sense. You are already experiencing it yourself that 25 minutes is way too long. Shorter lessons will make for better behavior in the classroom.
     
  9. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2011
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 9, 2011

    Now I definitely know why I have so many attention problems with my class.... a 45 minute math lesson is too much for them when the entire thing is planned to be whole group.. =(
     
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 9, 2011

    Read alouds are my longest too. That's when I usually hit 15 minutes.
     
  11. Hitchcock fan

    Hitchcock fan Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2011
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 9, 2011

    Even with older students, changing activities about three times during a 70-minute class is essential or you will lose them.
     
  12. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 10, 2011

    I teach 4th grade and for the most part my mini-lessons are 15-20 minutes taught on the rug. The rest of the "lesson" is time spent doing independent or group practice back at their seats while I meet with small groups or conference. Sometimes it can be hard to stick to that time frame but I do find I lose their full attention (or at least some of them) if I go over that time. I'm used to it now and I like having all the extra time in a period to work with small groups or work one-on-one with a student.
     
  13. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 10, 2011

    I teach 4th grade and some people might think 4th/5th graders are too old to sit on a rug for lessons, but that's the way its done in my school I prefer it. I find when they're on the rug I have their full attention and its very easy to see who is not paying attention because for the most part, all eyes are on me. If for some reason I'm teaching to them or even just giving directions to them while they're at their seats (which is very rare) I find it much, much harder to grab their attention and have everyone's eyes on me, because yes, there are much more distractions at their seats- pencils, books, chairs, etc.

    But as a side note- individual pencil cases drive me crazy and they are a big no-no in my classroom. We have tables not desks so the only things on their table are a bin for their independent reading books, a pencil cup with 5-6 classroom pencils and an eraser. I tell them to keep pencil cases either in their backpack or at home for homework. Everyone in class uses the same plain pencils that are shared among one table.
     
  14. 773 Miles Away

    773 Miles Away Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 10, 2011

    Just to get back on topic, I mentioned my lesson was 15 minutes anyway. And 5 minutes into it almost my whole class was not paying attention.
     
  15. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 10, 2011

    Yes, that is far too long and ineffective. They are able to focus for just a short bit, and the rest of that time you have lost them and there is likely very little learning taking place. Break up your math into chunks. This is what my math time looks like:

    Spiral Review 10 mins.

    Calendar 10 mins.

    Mini-lesson 10 mins

    Math centers rotation 1 15-20 mins (they are doing different things in the center time so it's not 15-20 minutes of just one thing)

    Math centers rotation 2 15-20 mins

    The kids can do small chunks, but they cannot sit and do one thing for a long time. Their brains actually will not allow it, and it is much too much to expect from them. Your math time can still be 1 hour, or whatever it is, but break it down to chunks so that they are changing up what they are doing.
     
  16. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,303
    Likes Received:
    785

    Sep 10, 2011

    I'm a 5th grade teacher. I can see your situation is a challenge, and not having children listen is frustrating. Here are some thoughts of some things that I've done that I have found helpful.

    1. Take a 15 minute time to model exactly what you want them to do. Show them what they should do. You might want to think a way to make this kind of fun so it doesn't seem boring or that your talking down at them.

    2. You probably have already have one, but come up with a signal such as one magical word, a bang on a drum, or something that requires them to look at you, hands off materials, and voices off. Say you will give them 2 days to get this correct. On the 3rd day if students don't do it correctly, then you will ________________
    If you can get their attention at any moment, you will be able to succeed. If not, you won't be able to teach much.

    The blank could be talk to them at recess, after school, note to parents. It must be small that you are willing to do every time. Large consequences don't work as children know teachers won't consistently give out large consequences for small misbehaviors. Also, parents will be much more supportive of small consequences than large consequences. Only go large if they refuse to listen after getting small consequences. Once they see you mean business, they won't like it at first, but it will soon improve.


    3. Don't hesitate to call home. I've found calls home work well with 90% of the parents on the 1st 2 phone calls in a school year. Be positive and non-emotional and most will listen even in the inner-city. By the 3rd call, some parents start getting annoyed, but most still will support you if this step is necessary. I try to avoid calling "too much".

    4. Send a positive note home to a few of the ones who are cooperating.

    Good luck!
     
  17. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,653
    Likes Received:
    233

    Sep 10, 2011

    This is the part that stuck out to me. Have you explicitly modeled for them how to take notes? I wonder if maybe some of them have no idea how to actually do that (maybe it was not done in 4th), and their frustration or confusion is causing them to tune out and act up. Just a thought.
     
  18. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,781
    Likes Received:
    243

    Sep 10, 2011

    So, "not listening" really could be due to a number of things, ranging from discipline issues to problems with the lessons themselves. It's hard to give suggestions that are really specific because the problem could be caused by a number of things - sort of like saying to a doctor you have a pain in your chest, and asking for medicine. They'd probably want to looker deeper into the problem with assessments/tests, and then start to try some different strategies.

    So, in that spirit, 2 questions for you:

    1. What's your current classroom management plan overview? In other words, what is it you are doing to attempt to prevent and address the issue currently?

    2. What do you see as the cause? For example, is there general lack of interest, 2 kids that are distracting the entire class, material is too difficult, the kids are too tired? Those are just a few ideas of course :).
     
  19. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 10, 2011

    What grade is it? What sort of lesson? What are your expectations of them when it is listening time? For the most part, my students sit in the ready to learn position (hands folded on desk) so I know they aren't playing with anything. I don't allow talking when I am talking. I will not continue if they are speaking.

    Can you be more specific about what's happening?
     
  20. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 10, 2011

    I looked back and see it is 5th grade. They should be able to handle a 15-minute lesson. Have you set up expectations for listening and practiced it?
     
  21. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    881
    Likes Received:
    211

    Sep 10, 2011

    I find it curious that you are an "incentive free" school. Is there a particular mindset that drives this idea? Do you not give grades either?


    Anyway, I wonder if you could try another method of instruction that did not require note taking? I agree that perhaps they lack the skill, bu if you can make it note free until they are able to listen and absorb the material, that may help you a bit. You'd only be fighting one battle, rather than two.
     
  22. Joy

    Joy Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Messages:
    579
    Likes Received:
    6

    Sep 10, 2011

    I have that sometimes when I am subbing. If I've warned them about it and they've ignored me, sometimes I just wait for them to be silent. I just stand in one spot without moving and wait for quiet. I usually get it pretty quickly and then we can go on.

    I would also explain the expectations very clearly before you get started. Let them know what they need to be doing before you start instructing. Student need to be reminded of what you expect out of them all the time. I would also try moving around the room while you teach. Stand next to the student who is whispering. It will stop pretty quick. If they still aren't listening, take away recess and tell them that they will spend that time practicing what they should have been doing before.
     
  23. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,726
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 10, 2011

    I've found that they have less attention span each year so I've really needed to up my management. I would take away all of the pencil boxes and empty their desks. Look into alternative storage options. Treat the room as if it were tables. I also would not teach until I had their attention. If you are continuing to talk over them then they will continue to talk and fidget.
     
  24. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,592
    Likes Received:
    4

    Sep 10, 2011

    Have you trained them on note taking? When I taught fifth grade in the an inner city area the majority of children walked in not having a clue how to take notes. I would spend months modeling it and doing whole class note taking. I would then move towards group note taking and individual note taking with clear expectations before having them sit and take notes for 25 minutes. The children would either write everything down or start distracting themselves or others when started before being trained.
     
  25. 773 Miles Away

    773 Miles Away Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 10, 2011

    We have a school wide system of note taking we must use (cornell notes) and it basically consists of student's copying exactly what I write (for the time being). Later when they are used to the process they are able to add more of their own input towards the notes. But for now it's teacher guided.

    I've done quite a lot. We've talked about sitting still, eyes on the speaker, respectful, etc. I've had kids model the wrong and right behavior. The rules are posted. We also have a color system to represent their behavior (green yellow red). My concern, and hopefully it's not an excuse, is that I have so many behavior kids in my room, literally. I have kids that are suppose to be in a behavior classroom, but because of space, they aren't. I also have kids who, even according to my guidance counselor, could be targeted towards that process as well. It's almost as if they never learned how to focus and they're in the 5th grade and I'm struggling to teach them.

    It's not my idea, it's from above. They don't want to reward kids with stickers or candy or priviledges for good behavior. They want good behavior to occur because it's the expectation (i.e. I shouldn't have to give you anything but praise because you doing the right thing, because you're suppose to do the right thing). So I guess it's not totally incentive free... the incentive is praise.

    The note taking is required as well.

    Ugh, it's just exhausting thinking about it. It's still early in the year so I'm going to just keep maintaining my expectations, but i'm just wondering if there are things I could be doing specifically to help.
     
  26. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Sep 10, 2011

    How long have you guys been in school so far? Is this still the first week?
     
  27. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,785
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 10, 2011

    Maybe it's just me, but I think having 5th grade students take cornell notes is asking too much. I teach 4/5 and I would not expect them to take notes. I would ask them to copy down some vocabulary words or spelling words or something, but to sit and listen and take notes is a bit much. Also, why should the be expected to do this? For what subject? Science or SS?

    I also think that taking the incentives out of the day of a child is rediculous. They are children and the whole point of incentives is to motivate and engage. Why is that wrong? Sounds like your school has taken all the fun out of your job, your class, and your instruction. Maybe there is a way around these silly restrictions?

    Sometimes teachers have to think out of the box; what could you do to make this more fun and interesting to your students? How can you help them want to listen? Could you have a puppet teach the lesson? Could you talk in different voices? Could you reward a table with a cheer if they stayed on task?

    Rick Morris has so many wonderful ideas for engaging students and keeping their school experience full of suprises and fun so that they buy into what you are trying to do. Add some humor, add some dog squeek toys, music, stand on your head, throw the unexpected at them. They will listen just to see what you are going to do next.
     
  28. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,303
    Likes Received:
    785

    Sep 11, 2011

    heavens54 listed great ideas and got me thinking.

    Here is one which I began with a class I had that had the worst time in listening. Put the notes in an envelope. Act like you are really curious about what is in the envelope. Everyone will stop and watch you open up the envelope, then read the information. Make sure you have a visual all set up to show "a copy" of the letter--SMARTBOARD, transparancy etc.

    I often use the envelope idea, and often kick myself when I don't. Other props as mentioned before really help.

    Another one is have all the notes on PowerPoint or something silmilar. Every once in awhile throw in a funny slide or a picture of something. It really lightens up the room and makes them want to pay attention more. Plus, I know I feel less stressed when the mood is a little funnier and lighter in the classroom.

    Also, music helps so much. When I am having them take notes, I might play part of a song that makes the point. 5th graders are in love with music, so they love this.

    *Last thing, note taking is important in 5th grade, so don't abandon ship. However, if it really is a problem, you might switch to only 5 minutes of note taking and then slowly increase it.

    **If you don't have a SMARTBOARD, then use transparencies and make one transparency really funny or different.

    Kevin
     
  29. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,785
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 11, 2011

    Kevin, is notetaking a standard in your state? I am not aware that note taking is necessary in fifth grade. What is the purpose and how is it useful to the students? I understand possibly taking notes from text books, but from oral instruction? I'm confused as to how this is taught and relevant in fifth grade.
     
  30. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,303
    Likes Received:
    785

    Sep 11, 2011

    As I'm in a private school, I'm not positive it is a standard in the state I teach (Arizona). It is a standard in the group of private schools that my school belongs to.

    I was blessed as a student with an incredibly pateient teacher who showed us how to take notes on Social Studies information. He first spent a week or two modeling it and did all the work. Soon he had us doing part of it, but he still did most of the work. After well over a month, we were taking our own notes. This experience saved me in middle school, high school, and college as no one ever did teach to take notes after that.

    I don't lecture and have my students take notes much. I do have them write down important facts from PowerPoint presentations and learn how to take notes from books and the internet on American History before they write their reports. I find good note-taking and organization of notes can lead to excellent reports.
     
  31. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 11, 2011

    One problem is that note taking is a very passive activity on the part of the kids, and that is not natural for them.

    As others have suggested you should change activities about every ten minutes with 5th graders. If you do not finish your note activity you can always go back to it, but try to get a couple of different activities in before you go back.

    Also think about using active cues to get their focus back on you every few minutes. For example, your give them two or three minutes of information, look at them as though you are fascinated and say something that makes them respond:

    'Can you believe that! Give me a no way!" and they all say "no way!" with enthusiasm. This makes them choose to pay attention to what you are doing. Cues like this can refocus them frequently. Just make sure and use different cues, things for them to say each time.
     
  32. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,466
    Likes Received:
    1,494

    Sep 11, 2011

    Teaching Cornell Notetaking in 5th grade is very ambitious! I will be teaching my students how to take Cornell Notes toward the middle of 6th grade (I think right now is a little too soon).

    With regard to the kids not listening--do you break things up when you're teaching your lesson? Even in 6th grade, I have the kids meet me on the carpet and I teach part of the lesson with them sitting on the rug and the other half of the lesson is spent with them in their seats. Additionally, I have them use white boards a lot, so I'm able to check for understanding throughout the entire lesson (plus, they love being able to write their answers on the white board).

    Check out Whole Brain Teaching (you can find lots of videos on YouTube). I recently discovered it and I think it's great!
     
  33. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,713

    Sep 11, 2011

    Why do people think that teaching Cornell notetaking isn't appropriate for 5th grade?
     
  34. TripleTeach

    TripleTeach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 12, 2011

    Our third graders are introduced to Cornell Notes




     
  35. stampin'teacher

    stampin'teacher Cohort

    Joined:
    May 15, 2011
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 12, 2011

    I have a similar issue with my students. I would love to be energized and throw interesting pictures or cues at them to get their attention, but the problem is with this group, they will now take that as a sign that it's ok to shout out, say strange things, etc. I have a handful of kids that really ruin it for the rest of the class, because they take advantage of these situations.

    Admin really wants me to treat them as a group entity, because before, they were very clicky and treated as several different groups co-habitating the same space. We are trying to teach them that they are a unit (have been the same group since K) and they work as a team, so when some falter, the whole class does.

    A double whammy is that we are not supposed to have consequences for actions. I can't take time away, I can't send a student somewhere else (office or another class) to work, I can't keep them in for part of snack/lunch. Kids know that my hands are pretty much tied, and I have zero parent support because the parents do not have a discipline plan at home. I know that each child that creates issues in class, is also one that has a parent choosing not to act as an authority figure at home.
     
  36. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,303
    Likes Received:
    785

    Sep 13, 2011

    Your case is difficult. You only have 5 choices.

    1. Creative ideas to make your lesson more meaningful, interesting, and geared towards the attention spans of 5th graders.
    2. Rewards (including a good behavior call/letter home)
    3. Conseqences (including a poor behavior call/letter home
    4. Do nothing
    5. Nag or yell and scream.

    I put these in the order, I would do them. If you don't choose some kind of consequence, reward, or make it interesting, you have nearly a 100% chance of lots of misbehavior. I have been inside classrooms of the national Disney teachers of the year award winners and they even use consequences and rewards of some sort. If admin, takes away some of your choices, you can make up more. Make your classroom with activities so fun missing them would be the worst punishment. They are your activities so you are free to take them away or use them.

    Also, I have dealt with parents that are so bad, I could write a book on them. Still, I always call parents. It works not because parents are so supportive (many are not), it works because children care about what their parents think. Children love to get a positive note, call, or postcard home. They hate for their mom or dad to find out they are messing around in school. Don't give up on parent communication--it isn't perfect, but it is helpful. I wish you the best of luck.

    Kevin
     
  37. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 14, 2011

    Everyone probably shakes their head and says "Not again" when I say these things, but along with YoungTeacherGuy, I heartily recommend Whole Brain Teaching as an effective and fun way to deal with the challenges you are facing now.
     
  38. queenie

    queenie Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 14, 2011

    So what you have are 10 & 11 year olds who have to sit still and copy some words, AND they have no incentive to sit still and copy some words. Wow. I couldn't do it myself!!

    I would first take away anything they may be tempted to play with. Find a storage spot for pencil boxes and allow them one pencil at their desks. Don't allow anything they don't absolutely need at their desks.

    Next, I wouldn't have students demonstrate the wrong way to do something. I would model the right way, the wrong way, and the not quite right way, explaining that not quite right still isn't the right way...then I'd let them practice only the right way.

    I would go over the procedures and expectations at the beginning of each and every week until most of them get it.

    The first time a student does ANYTHING I didn't want them to do, I would stop lecturing/teaching and say, "I want to remind you that you are expected to not make noises while taking notes" (or whatever the behavior is.) Perhaps you could take up the papers they are writing on and start all over. Tell them they must do it right or do it again. If just a few are causing problems, you could have them take notes at recess again- treat it like you are training them to take notes the correct way and you really hope they learn to do it so they won't need to be trained again.

    Also, you can always find positive incentives that aren't tangible- lunch with the teacher, free time while the others are trained in note taking, happy notes home, etc.

    Finally, I would go to the office first thing tomorrow (or send the secretary an email) and ask for phone numbers for the students causing the most trouble and make phone calls right away.

    The longer you allow behavior to take place, the less faith they have that you are ever going to do anything about the behavior.

    How does your behavior plan (red, yellow, green) work? What are the consequences, etc.?
     
  39. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,785
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 18, 2011

    This is new to me; how is it taught and why? I don't understand notes from a lecture/lesson. Notes out of a text, I understand the advantage. I haven't worked with this. When I was in fifth, outlines were the big thing, to use with oral reports. I'm not too sure what happened to that plan. But Cornell note taking being useful in the fifth grade classroom could be true, just not sure of the benefit.

    I do have my students copy down some important concepts such as math terms and other certain important information in their journals. Maybe that is the kind of thing you are meaning when you say Cornell notes? Not really sure.
     
  40. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,713

    Sep 18, 2011

    I don't really understand you response. Are you familiar with Cornell notes? They're not meant for just older students. They aren't just any old notes; they have a very specific purpose and use.

    The purpose of taking Cornell notes is that you create for yourself a sort of study guide for later review. There's an added benefit of using your Cornell notes to asses your own understanding of the material, since you are required to write a summary of the content of your notes. I think that it's an excellent idea to teach the Cornell style to all students who are old enough to take notes of any kind.
     
  41. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 18, 2011

    You can face their desks backwards and label their pencil boxes. Keep the pencil boxes on a shelf away from the desks and have a helper pass them out as needed.

    Do lessons on he carpet. Use turn and talk, think-pair-share and other interactive strategies.

    Have them refocus with their bodies. Clap, put their hands together, twiddle your thumbs, stetch, etc.

    Include a read aloud in many lessons. Even in math. You could probably find a read aloud for nearly every subject. If you have a projector for your computer, short you tube videos are great too.

    My school doesn't use incentives. However, if you can schedule 15 minutes at the end of every day for free choice, you can simply look at your watch and remind them the more by veer off the schedule, the less choice time they will have.

    If your school does celebrations like a Halloween party, you can tell the class you are saving 90 minutes for that party. Every time you don't get through a lesson you will take some minute amount away from their party.

    When I taught in the inner city I gave each child a Dixie cup and walked around with pretzels, gold fish, raisins or marshmallows. I would give just one but it worked. I would never do that where I work now, but it worked there. I understand what you're going through.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. aliqapo
Total: 194 (members: 2, guests: 171, robots: 21)
test