Help! I just got a SPED teaching job for a position I've never had before

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by lovethislife, Apr 28, 2020.

  1. lovethislife

    lovethislife Guest

    Apr 28, 2020

    Hello,
    I have been a SPED teacher for only three years and the experience has only been at a high school and a middle school. I just accepted a position as an elementary resource teacher and am looking for someone who can help me get oriented with what I need to do to be successful. This is very different than my previous positions. I don't want to start a new job not knowing what I am supposed to do. Can anyone offer advice or support as regards to methods for scheduling with gen ed teachers and other DIS providers as well as scheduling aides? Do you think it would seem like I don't know what I am doing if I asked to talk to other teachers about this in the school or at the district?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 29, 2020
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  3. Sadnezz

    Sadnezz Guest

    Apr 29, 2020

    I spent several months as a student teacher in a RSP setting. Connecting and creating relationships with students + general education teachers are a must. Being organized and staying on top of things are very important too. As a resource teacher, you will have to do assessments for initials and tri's, hold IEP meetings (initial, annual, tri's, and transition). My mentor teacher was on top of everything, and she would attend staff meetings...and volunteered at after school activities to bond with the families.

    I saw new RSP teachers (at my school) found scheduling to be a difficult task. Students have different minutes on their IEPs. So, it was hard for them to figure out a schedule that would meet the students' needs (grouping) and meet the minutes...and they had to be mindful about what the students were doing in their general education classroom at the time they pulled them out. In addition, they had to give their IA's a schedule and works.

    I think once you can get the scheduling done, things will be easier afterwards.
     
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  4. Sadnezz

    Sadnezz Guest

    Apr 29, 2020

    w
     
  5. lovethislife

    lovethislife Guest

    Apr 29, 2020

    Thank you so much! Any suggestions on how to go about scheduling? That's the part that scares me. For example, was there a method that you saw the teacher use to schedule efficiently? Do you think it would seem like I don't know what I am doing if I asked to talk to other teachers about this in the school or at the district?
     
  6. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Apr 29, 2020

    You need to talk to your administrators before you begin scheduling. I was an elementary resource teacher for about 3.5 years of my career. In some schools, administrators either create the schedule themselves, or they have strict guidelines for when and how you can pull kids. You would need to know this in order to create your schedule, and I don't think you would look like you don't know what you're doing simply because you ask if there are guidelines. In fact, I think it would make it look like you know exactly what you are doing. In other schools, it's a free for all, and you can create the schedule however you want. In that case, you should absolutely reach out to the classroom teachers to ask for their input on what times or subjects to avoid. You can't make them all happy all the time, but you can show that you are making an effort. It's essential that you put forth a good effort with the classroom teachers, as you'll need to work with them often in order to get paperwork completed and to ensure that they are providing accommodations for the students you share. When it comes to paras, you'll have to first figure out when students need a para, and then try to slide a para into each time slot. You'll also have to factor in their breaks, which can make that quite challenging. Without a doubt, scheduling is one of the most difficult parts of this job. Hang in there.
     
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  7. Sadnezz

    Sadnezz Guest

    Apr 29, 2020

    I came into the classroom in the second half of the school year, so all the scheduling had already been done. Just be flexible. After working with the kids, you might have to move a student to a different group/pull out at a different time. Don't expect your schedule to be perfect the first time around. I would suggest for you to talk to the administrator to see if the previous teacher left behind a schedule. This way, you can keep things consistent for the students (since it's hard to schedule when you don't know the students well) and also tweak it as needed.
     
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  8. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    Apr 29, 2020

    You might have a schedule from last year to look at. I would hope they wouldn't send you in blindly to do all the work.
     
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