HELP! Group control Montessori style

Discussion in 'Montessori Archives' started by aescamilla, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. aescamilla

    aescamilla New Member

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    Aug 13, 2006

    Hello sweet teachers.

    I teach 1st and 2nd grade at a traditional style school; however, I have always admired the wonderful silent work time and group control Montessori teachers obtain.

    Can anyone please give me tips on which techniques are to be followed for achieving such wonderful atmosphere?

    THanks

    Kari
     
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  3. Pickles

    Pickles Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2006

    Hi - I teach 3-6 year olds which is a plane where the child focuses on more individual work. After 6 the children and activities become a little more social. Hopefully a 6-9 teacher will respond for you. I'll tell you how the 3-6 level does it.

    The way it works is that there are many options for the children in what to work on. The activities are self-contained in one location (ex: all on one tray) which brings their focus in. Therefore the children are focused on working on what interests them. This focused concentration creates the quiet, cooperative work environment you are speaking of.

    Also, the behavior of the teacher directs the children's behavior. When a teacher moves slowly, speaks quietly and gently, the children respond with similar energy. It takes some practice to remain calm when the children get high energy, or to move slowly when you feel something must be moved immediately, but when you see the effect it has, it's worth it. I squat down to the children's level and speak near whisper to address them. They must focus on my face to understand what I'm saying.

    Removing distractions is another part of it. Consider your classroom an environment where people are trying to work. If a child is distracting other's work, we will have an assistant take them outside for a walk or meet that child's needs in some way that won't be distracting to the other children. Use this language and encourage the children to use that language with each other. "You are distracting my work. Can you please be more quiet?" This puts that control in their hands rather than turning to you to solve it, and the need for quiet calm comes from them.
     
  4. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    Aug 13, 2006

    I recommend purchasing the book, " A Teachers Bag of Tricks" by Greg Nelson. He offers tried and true tips and solutions for classroom management in a Montessori classroom. Contact me if you would like the address to order the book.
     
  5. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

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    Aug 15, 2006

    Nice post, Pickles!
    Providing work that stimulates creativity and provides a challenge is one of the keys. Also that they can choose and initiate their own activities is a factor in developing concentration. The adult role model is another. This includes observing and protecting concentration and self-directed movement. Removing distractions is a third. The 4th is the 3 hour work cycle and the 5th is the control of error. There are others...
    The 3 hour work cycle provides time for a cycle of activity that generally follows a certain pattern. The child comes in and chooses an "orienting" activity. This is usually a material that has a low level of challenge for the child. Throughout the morning work cycle, the child chooses increasingly more difficult and time consuming materials. There is a period that occurs after about 2 hours called "false fatigue" - the children appear restless, the noise and energy levels rise. If the Directress allows the class to work through false fatigue regularly without interruptions, the children will choose the most challenging and fulfilling work of the day - and show the most concentration.
    Also, because the materials contain a "control of error", the child is not dependent on the adult to assess his work. This reduces noise and movement.
     
  6. Jeana

    Jeana New Member

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    Sep 21, 2006

    Hi, I work with Toddlers, in a Center where the Philosophy is Montessori.
     
  7. Jeana

    Jeana New Member

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    Sep 21, 2006

    Hi
    I would like the address for the Book, Bag of Tricks and also the address to order quality and affordable Montessori Materials for toddlers to work individually. For this age it is very difficult for me to make it less teacher directed, so those two things would be helpful.
    Thank you!
     
  8. brina618

    brina618 Rookie

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    Sep 21, 2006

    The cheapest place i have found to order montessori supplies is montessoriconcepts.com, also alisonsmontessori.com they offer 20%off of your total order. Try those two sites.
     
  9. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2006

    A Teacher's Bag of Tricks by Greg Nelson

    Send orders to:
    Greg Nelson
    Dept. of Elementary and Early Childhood Education
    Bridgewater State College
    Bridgewater, MA 02325

    Price: $20.00 plus $1.50 Shipping

    Make checks payable to Greg Nelson

    This is the information that I found in his book. You may want to get in touch with him to see if the price has increased. This is one of the best resources that I have found for classroom mangement.

    Little Red Robin specialized in Montessori materials for toddler's. You can google the name it will come up. I have also purchased materials from Alison's Montessori and I am very impressed with the quality and price.
     
  10. Pickles

    Pickles Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2006

    Redirecting Children's Behavior

    There is a course offered at my school called Redirecting Children's Behavior. It's inspired by the work of Rudolf Dreikurs, M.D. If you can take a course in this, it will give you a lot of great methods for working with children. If you can't find the course, look for his books!
     

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