Help! (again)

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by missjessica, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. missjessica

    missjessica Rookie

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    Jun 30, 2011

    What would us first year teachers do without all of your advice?
    I'm teaching high school next year, but this summer I'm teaching PRESCHOOL for four weeks. I just got my classroom today and:
    1. Every single thing is covered up or locked away (which I totally understand)
    2. The district is not giving us money to use to buy what we need
    3. I'm a first year teacher so I don't have any materials.

    Some other teachers were nice enough to let me borrow a few boxes of blocks, games, books, and I set up a play area with a little sink, fridge, stove, etc.

    I have very limited resources. I decided to go with a "jungle" theme since the teacher next door had leftover materials from last year. Anyone have any suggestions for jungle-themed projects or books I could find within the next few days (time is tight because I'm also moving tomorrow)? I have preschoolers who are 3-4 years old and all have language delays.

    Thank you, thank you, thank you!:)
     
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  3. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Jun 30, 2011

    Read lots of jungle books! I can't think of any off hand. You might want to go to the Preschool message board and ask. I taught kindergarten ESY and I did an activity where they fished for sight words. Google it and you can see directions. Since you will have language impaired little ones, you can do it with pictures and they have to say the pictures of the word.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jun 30, 2011

    They could make a giant tree and different animals to hang from it. Butterflies are easy. You could make other animals too for the tree.

    Sequencing activities are great. Maybe give them pictures and having the sequence them in order, especially ones that go along with a book that you read.

    Marble painting with blues and greens.
     
  5. xitalianacutiex

    xitalianacutiex Rookie

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    Jul 2, 2011

    When I had limited resources and needed materials, thrift shops were my best friends. I would look for those books that have the sound buttons, stuffed animals, etc at the book store.

    You could also create paper plate animal masks (like a tiger or monkey) and generate activities focused on the needs of the students.

    Are they focusing on letter identification? You could find cutesy letter activities tied to jungle animals, just do a google search and you should come up with plenty.

    I would also look for fine motor activities related to the jungle. You could use the blocks to create a jungle habitat and have plastic animals from the dollar store.

    Or you could focus on one jungle animal a week.... Create a bulletin board outside the classroom and each week add another animal to it, so by the end it looks amazing. I had a beach/luau theme for my spec. ed preschool class and the last week we made fruit kabobs with marshmallows, strawberries, etc. We also had a HUGE luau party the last day of school...
     
  6. xitalianacutiex

    xitalianacutiex Rookie

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    Jul 3, 2011

    Hi again,

    Sorry I was reading your other post and noticed some of your students are mostly immobile... I had students like this. What was recommended to me was to work on eye gaze for students and to, as much as possible, use actual items instead of pictures when trying to get them to communicate with eye gaze. If trying to do yes/no questions, I would make the symbols 8x11.

    If the student is in a wheelchair, I velcroed a strip to the tray and then velcroed items to the different sides and if the student could, we would teach them to grab the item requested.

    You should check out abilitations.com for switches, but since it is summer school, try seeing if your state or area has an augementative alternative communication organization that loans out devices and switches. Then maybe you can get devices that the students can activate with their heads or feet and you could work on cause/effect etc.

    If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.
     
  7. missjessica

    missjessica Rookie

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    Jul 3, 2011

    Thanks for the advice, everyone! They changed my class and switched some students in and out. I have 2 students who are in wheelchairs, the other 8 are not. I spoke with the teacher who has them during the year and none are doing letter identification yet. She mostly seemed concerned about them having enough "dramatic play" time and fine motor activities at the tables.
    A friend of mine gave me a box of small instruments so I'm thinking about having a 15 minute part of each day being dedicated to music/movement. I'd like to separate the students into small groups and give them the instruments to play with. I found some music for students to move/jump/walk around to, but what about the students in the wheelchairs? Can their aides just move their feet for them? I want them to feel like they're a part of the group.
    Also, I love all the craft ideas! I went to Dollar Tree and bought a giant black tablecloth I pinned onto the wall of the classroom. I made some trees for each side, and as we make animals during craft time we'll add them to the wall.
    I have another question: In a 3-hour day, how many scheduled "bathroom breaks" should I have for the kids? In my kindergarten class for student teaching we went 3 times in 3 hours!
    Thanks again, everyone. I am loving all of your ideas. :)
     
  8. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 3, 2011

    I work with preschoolers who have autism, and they looove this song. Beware, the video is pretty corny! It goes along with your jungle theme and you could sing it during music time. Our higher functioning kids do the movements and sing along, while our lower functioning kids can do the moves independently or with hand-over-hand.
     
  9. missjessica

    missjessica Rookie

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    Jul 5, 2011

    I had my first day today. It went "okay." It could have been better and it could have been worse. The aides commented numerous times on the lack of resources available in the classroom. I managed to get some chairs for some of the students who need special equipment.
    Today just felt a little hectic and unstructured. I am hoping it will go better tomorrow. Some of the students had a REALLY hard time with transitions, but I don't have anything (like timers) to help out with that.
    During table time I also had trouble keeping students seated and interested in their tables when they saw something interesting going on at another table.
    Like I said, hoping tomorrow goes better.
    But it was, after all, my VERY first day as a real teacher.
     
  10. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Congrats! It will go better tomorrow. It really does just take time for you and the students to find the swing of things.
     
  11. missjessica

    missjessica Rookie

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    Jul 5, 2011

    Yeah, it's also hard because 2 of the aides in my class know ALL of the students already and I know none of them. I felt like they were helping out SO much today because they know what to expect and how to deal with the behavior and I don't. It was almost embarrassing.
    I definitely need to stick to the schedule more tomorrow.
    Anyone have any good transition advice? We had a few meltdowns today.
     
  12. teaching4God

    teaching4God Cohort

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    Jul 5, 2011

    Chicka Chicka Boom Boom? There are probably all kinds of websites for that book.
     
  13. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 5, 2011

    I like to use visual schedules (using board maker pictures) and verbal reminders (ex "five minutes until we go back to the classroom, four minutes, three minutes,...." etc)
     
  14. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    When it's time to transition, I would tell them where I wanted them to be and then sing a little song as the assistants helped the kids to where they should be. Then as the kids got there, give them a stamp or sticker or something for following directions.
     
  15. LovetoteachPREK

    LovetoteachPREK Companion

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    Jul 6, 2011

    When I went to TEACCH training, I learned to use a 5-point timer for transitions. I put up five pictures on the whiteboard and take one down at a time over a short interval of time. When the pictures are gone, choice time is over. You can also make an individual 5-point timer on a velcro strip for students having trouble waiting for their turn, etc.
     
  16. xitalianacutiex

    xitalianacutiex Rookie

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    Jul 7, 2011

    I love TEACCH!!! Actually I love a hybrid of TEACCH and ABA, works wonderfully if done the right way... I love the work task books that TEACCH has too...

    Visuals for little ones are everything
     
  17. missjessica

    missjessica Rookie

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    Jul 7, 2011

    I will definitely try to incorporate more visuals into the day. My biggest problem is lack of resources. Any free websites that have good visual aides? I know one of my students DEFINITELY needs a visual schedule. She has had 2 meltdowns in the past 2 days during transition times.
     
  18. xitalianacutiex

    xitalianacutiex Rookie

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    Jul 7, 2011

    google images is my best friend...

    Try www.senteacher.org

    this is the direct link to aac/picture symbols... it has a lot of links on there that are useful...

    http://www.senteacher.org/Worksheet/6/PECS.xhtml

    All you do is put in the keyword, like book (for reading class) then change the word that goes in the picture symbol to reading class and you have your pecs for a visual schedule that is individual, and it's free. I have always had access to Mayer-Johnson Boardmaker, but for those who do not, that website is really good.
     

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