HELP! Adaptive Behavior?

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by syd622, Sep 14, 2006.

  1. syd622

    syd622 Rookie

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    Sep 14, 2006

    I work at a tier one middle school with between 8-12 special needs students in each class I teach. A few of my students have been placed in a co-teach classroom due to last minute ARDs. One student in particular throws tantrums, is aggresive towards fellow classmates, and he openly defies teacher directives on a daily basis. The tantrums begin with a teacher's request for the student to obey class rules; the student in question will then throw his body on the floor, scream, and throw books and other items at classmates. During one tantrum session a school policeman had to physically pick up the young man and remove him from the classroom (he was held by the officer in the school clinic until a guardian arrived to take him home). Today, this same student threw books, yelled, intentionally threw objects at other students and had to be escorted to the assistant principal's office. Once in the AP's office, he was left to his own devices where he proceeded to kick walls and make noise...be generally disrespectful (the reason for this action: the office staff said that they wanted the student to know that they had better things to do than to deal with his behavior). OMG???
    All the student really learned was that he could get out of class by misbehaving; I'm still reeling from the lack of consequences. One of the counselors even admitted that the young man belonged in a self contained adaptive behavior class, however, the schedule change would have to wait at least 30 days for an emergency ARD to occur.

    PLEASE HELP: suggestions needed!

    I have to help this student despite the 30 day wait in limbo, and I have to keep all the other students in his classes safe.
     
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  3. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Enthusiast

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    Sep 14, 2006

    Just so you know that you aren't alone. I am the teacher of a self contained unit. I have/had only one student in my class, but have about 6 others on my caseload that I must monitor their behaviors. The reason that I say have/had is because right now he is being homeschooled. The first week of school was beautiful. He had his moments, but made it through 4 entire days of school not being sent home. Then the Dr's changed his meds and the next two weeks were just plain torture for both him and I. We tried everything from sending him home for minor infractions, to letting him just tear up my room. When my student "goes off " he calls us names that I have never heard of and I have two teenagers living in my house. He knocks over furniture and the ultimate is that he spits on anyone within the "splash zone" as we call it. The mom called an ARD and well this was what we came up with. Home schooled until meds and behaviors are under control, which with his issues that might not ever happen. I am beginning to feel the way you do, there were never any kinds of consequences for this child except to go home which is what he wanted. Any time that I put "work" in front of this child he uses his issues to get what he wants. The funny thing is that everyone is saying that this kid can't do that because of he doesn't have what it takes up stairs to think that far ahead. Well I am the only one that has spent more than 3 minutes with this kid. They all read his file that pretty much states that he cant and wont be able to do anything academically. Well I have news for them this kid and his mom have learned to play the game. He is smarter than the higher ups in my district think he is. I see the wheels turning in his head every morning so that he can go home. Sorry that this is so long and kind of off topic but once I got started typing I just couldnt stop. I am not sure that I helped you, but just getting some things of my chest helped.
     
  4. syd622

    syd622 Rookie

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    Sep 14, 2006

    Thank you for your reply, it made me feel better to know that I'm not alone. I really care about the student I mentioned, he has quite a personality and he brings something special to the classroom (on his good days). The only acceptable thing to do is to keep trying. I refuse to take his misbehavior personally; and I'm not going to let him out of completing his class work either : )
     
  5. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Enthusiast

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    Sep 15, 2006

    Believe me I know how hard it is not take it personally. I spent an entire weekend wallowing in self pity that I was responsible some how for what went on my room over the last few weeks. I finally realized that No I am not the cause of this kids problems. I can try to help him but I will never cure him. I think he is a great kid when he chooses to be, but he has learned that if something is too hard for him that he can go off, and be sent home. I am going to guess that at the hospital they let him do what he wants because it's easier since they have other kids there as well. All I can say he has met his match with me and I WILL teach him to read, even if it kills me and him in the process.
     
  6. D'Maestro

    D'Maestro Rookie

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    Sep 15, 2006

    My concern is what happens to majority of the students who want to learn? I think they're being deprived of precious learning time everytime your student throws a tantrum. I believe that student should be homeschooled for that 30 day period until s/he can go back to a self-contained adaptive behavior class.

    Have you tried talking to the student why s/he does such things? Have you tried doing functional analysis of his tantrums? What are the possible reasons why she throws tantrums aside from the presenting problem which is to not follow rules and to get away from the classroom?

    Is it possible that the tantrum is an attention seeking behavior? The more one reprimands the student the more reinforced the behavior gets?

    Could it be a lack of structure in the classroom?

    I'm not sure on how to help you but my only suggestion is to try and figure out the reasons behind the tantrums.

    Keep us posted on how you're able to deal with your student.
     

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