Having never taken Calculus what are my

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by RLucas, Oct 12, 2007.

  1. RLucas

    RLucas Rookie

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    Oct 12, 2007

    odds of passing the Subset III? Mainly to Jay besides your questions which I plan on getting next payday what else should I do? I want to prepare to pass this test on the first try and not try try again like I did with Geometry so I want to be completely prepared. I don't want to teach Calculus but want to have the test under my belt.
    Thanks for the help

    Rachel
     
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  3. innovationguy

    innovationguy Cohort

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    Oct 14, 2007

    I'm not aware of your Math background; specifically, if you've taken classes w Trigonometry and / or Calculus before. In the event that you haven't, I would aver that while Subtest I and II can probably be self-taught - and likewise, for the Trigonometry portion of Subtest III - it'd just be expedient to take a class at a community college for the Calculus.

    Find prep resources for Subtest III here and, for the Content Standards, click here.... Here's a good idea of the Syllabus.

    This thread has some useful stuff.


    Jay.
    http://innovationguy.easyjournal.com
     
  4. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2007

    Go to thinkwell.com and buy the Calculus course. Or look for it on eBay--but get one with an unused code so you can access the online portion of the sourse. It is a combination of video instruction, notes, quizzes and tests. My 15 year old taught herself Calculus 1 (first half), took a challenge exam for the class at the community college, and is now taking Calc. 2 there while she finishes her senior year of high school. (She's 16 now).
     
  5. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Oct 15, 2007

    I agree with Jay. If you are good at teaching yourself math, and can find just the right book, you might be able to teach yourself calculus sufficiently well to pass. But I think it would be most expedient to sign up for a course at your local community college, or an on-line course with an accessible instructor to answer any questions that come up.

    FWIW if you don't plan to teach anything beyond Algebra 2, you don't need the full math credential. Most districts would be happy to hire you with the Foundational-level credential.
     

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