Haven't taught in 9 years - eek!

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by piggle, Mar 18, 2009.

  1. piggle

    piggle Rookie

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    Mar 18, 2009

    As I'm reading through the forums here, I'm a little (ok, a lot!) worried about my hiatus from teaching. I don't remember all of the educational theory, and I'm not up to date on the latest and greatest techniques. I only taught for 2 years prior to leaving the field (my 2 children are 13 months apart - need I say more? :p).

    I've emailed my department head / supervising teacher - we were very close when I taught, and he was devastated when I left. It's only been a week, but I haven't heard back from him yet, and I'd like to apply for a job next week. The director of my school (a science magnet) is long gone and I can't find a current email or any other contact info (she is retired). I'm also worried that she won't remember enough to give me a strong reference. :blush:

    For the last 6 years, I've been writing and teaching classes on Photoshop, digital photography and photo organization, and digital scrapbooking. I do have excellent references from my manager and editor (from 2 different jobs / companies), but I'm worried they won't hold as much weight as a school reference would.

    I'm trying to put a positive spin on my experience - but I'm currently feeling like I'm stuck in an awkward teaching position - 10 years out of school and education classes, yet barely any teaching experience at the middle school / high school level.

    Does anyone have any advice for brushing up on educational theory, or creating a portfolio where one doesn't exist?? I don't have access to any of my old files. Most were lost in the great hard drive crash of '05 - I stupidly hadn't backed them up because I hadn't taught in 5 years, and figured most would be hopelessly out of date if I went back to teaching.

    I do have my student teaching reports from my observing teacher (I did my student teaching concurrent with my actual teaching - on an emergency permit for AP Bio). They are excellent - but will those hold any weight? Again - I don't think my education professor would remember me since it has been so long, and he's now moved to a different school.

    Sorry this is so lengthy - if anyone has any advice I'm all ears! :)
     
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Mar 18, 2009

    I also had a lengthy hiatus--10 years in my case. I began by being a daily sub, then had 2 long term sub positions before getting a permanent contract in 2001. When I went for my first interview, I didn't know any of the terminology, or remember much from my studies. I was, however, highly recommended by the principal at the school where I subbed, so I got the position. Right after being hired, I spent a long time on the school board website, reading everything that was there about philosophy, school plans, assessment policies, etc. It was a wealth of invaluable information. I would suggest that you search out district websites and see what you can find; they can help you focus in on what the district priorities currently are.

    As far as references and your recent experiences, play up what you have. I know that there are lots of members here who are experts at helping you polish a cover letter and resume.

    Good luck in your search!
     
  4. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Mar 18, 2009

    Check out the thread on buzz words - currently admin love Multiple Intelligence, Bloom's Taxonomy, Cooperative Learning, Data Driven Instruction, etc. There are tons more.

    For your portfolio: Start easy on yourself. Parent letter, student letter, management plan, letters of rec, sample lesson, pics of your classroom, notes from students (if they survived). The lesson is something you'll have to evolve with the state standards, but everyone on here is really nice and will help you out :)
     
  5. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Mar 18, 2009

    I was out longer than you (15 years) and found a job. I was elementary certified but got certified for middle school. That helps because those jobs are not as popular as elementary. I wanted to teach science and that helped. I subbed part time for several years but I learned the newest lingo by going to inservices as often as possible. Call your local district and see if they'll let you sit in on their sessions. PA has a law that teachers must have 150 hours of training every 5 years so a lot of districts are offering training for their subs so they don't lose their certification. A LTS job helped cement my credibility. Good luck!
     
  6. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    Mar 18, 2009

    I don;t have any advice other than what was already said, but just wanted to say good luck!!! :)
     
  7. subteacher68

    subteacher68 Rookie

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    Mar 19, 2009

    I agree with subbing. It is a great way to get up-to-date on the latest lingo and it gets your name out there. I only taught 3 years before I decided to stay home with my kids and I was out of teaching for 11 1/2 years before I started subbing. I have been subbing since Jan. of 08 and I am hoping to get a full-time job for the upcoming school year. If you don't get something for this Aug. I would highly recommend getting on sub lists and if at all possible do at least one long-term sub assignment. It gets you back in the groove and it will make the P notice you more than if you are a short-term sub. JMO Good luck!
     

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