Have you had a SEIT in your class?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Bored of Ed, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Jul 18, 2011

    For clarification purposes, I'm in NY where SEIT stands for Special Education Itinerant Teacher and refers to special ed teachers who come into the regular class to work with a child in the natural context for one or two periods a day. I do this from time to time when I can get a case that fits nicely in my schedule. They're not so easy to come by these days.

    Just curious to hear from others in this kind of setup how it works, what kind of things the SEIT does with the kid, what their role in your classroom is like... sometimes I feel very ambiguous and not quite sure what to do without interfering too much with the class goings-on.
     
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  3. CrayolaCrayon

    CrayolaCrayon Companion

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    Jul 20, 2011

    One of my Music & Movement students had a SEIT. She was there during my class time three days out of the week. When she first joined our team of teachers, we discussed how to handle the child's behaviors so we were on the same page.

    She observed the majority of the time but if the child became very disruptive, she would step in. Occasionally, that meant taking the child out of the room for some time (time-out). She posed questions to help the child make good decisions during independent play and gave gentle reminders to do things like take turns. Since this particular child did not sleep during nap time anyway, she took her out of the room at that time to work one-on-one. During that time, she did activities for fine motor skills and gross motor skills, and talked to the child about feelings.

    When you get a new SEIT position, start off by discussing your plan with the teacher. See if it fits what their expectations are in terms of how much observing, guiding and one-on-one you do with the child.
     
  4. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Jul 20, 2011

    Maybe I'm wrong but I always feel like I'm wasting time by "observing" if I do too much of it.... I guess it's a good thing though if the kid is doing well enough not to need much intervention.
     
  5. CrayolaCrayon

    CrayolaCrayon Companion

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    Jul 21, 2011

    I can understand why you would feel that way. I'm sure there are many cases that require more intervention than what I described! I should have said that the child I was speaking of has only mild needs, struggling primarily with behaviors and social interactions.
     
  6. Pre-K Teacher 1

    Pre-K Teacher 1 Comrade

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    Jul 21, 2011

    We have this in our classrooms. They do team teaching. They sit down and plan together using themes. The special education teacher has specific goals to work on with each child who has an IEP but so does the regular education teacher. The team approach helps so that they are all collaborating to meet the goals for the IEPs in the classroom. The teachers learn so much from each other. This year they are going to do the assessments and parent-teacher conferences together.
     

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