Have you ever had a family refuse services?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by waterfall, Oct 9, 2013.

  1. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Oct 9, 2013

    This happened to us today :(. The student came from another school last year and apparently the family didn't realize the IEP would follow him. He was due for a re-eval meeting and parents refused testing and all services. He was seeing me, the speech-therapist, the school psych, and the OT. Apparently in this family's culture admitting to having a child with a disability reflects negatively on the parents. This kid really needs the help and was one of my favorite kids to work with. I'm bummed.
     
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  3. bison

    bison Habitué

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    Yes. It's really hard to let go when you know the child needs help but the family refuses it for one reason or another. It's a shame.
     
  4. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    There was a girl last year who's adopted mom refused service... terrible story all around... the girl has PTSD from physical and sexual abuse, she's basically at the level of a kindergartner in both math and reading, but sitting in a fourth grade classroom without SPED support because her IQ is far too low to show a discrepancy for LD, the adopted mom won't sign for Emotional Disability, and there's nothing there to qualify her under OHI. The school is actually beginning to peel away Tier 3 support for her, because it's not doing her any real good, never will do her any good, and is basically just taking away potential service from kids who would benefit.
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    My MIL refused services for my ex-husband. She took it personally, like it was somehow admitting failure on her part. Instead of permitting testing, she pulled him from public school.

    He needs accommodations for work, but without a history of special education services, he is out of luck. Now there is a huge problem trying to get disability benefits with no history. She did him a great disservice.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    If the student desperately needs the help, the district can file due process against the parents, I believe, in order for the IEP to be kept until a hearing can be convened, as the IEP would be put into stay-put status.

    Did the parents reject a re-evaluation or the IEP altogether? Did the meeting turn into an exit meeting or has one been scheduled?
     
  7. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Oct 10, 2013

    With the little girl who was adopted it might be possible to contact the social services in the area about it. Often if a child is adopted through foster care they are still monitored or in contact to some extent.
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I've had it happen several times, usually because parents don't understand the process or they are worried about the stigma. With several families, we have been able to work past the reluctance, but with some we have not. It's difficult, and sad, but there is little we can do other than provide all of the support we can within the classroom.
     
  9. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    From my experience, unless it's a "this child has severe intellectual disabilities and parents are refusing services" type of situation, schools won't take anything to due process, because if only for PR reasons, you never want to be in a courtroom with a parent on the other side, even if you are "right."
     
  10. Mellz Bellz

    Mellz Bellz Comrade

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    Oct 10, 2013

    We had one of our 6th graders's parents refuse the continuation of services at their middle school transition meeting last May. It was a bit of a shock to myself, the elementary school teachers, and P. We all begged the parent to reconsider, but she just didn't want her daughter to go into middle school with a "label." She felt not getting services would challenge her daughter. We had to exit her.

    Luckily the classes were already set up at that point so this girl does happen to be in inclusion classes. She is actually adjusting pretty well and is pretty self motivated. She's not afraid to ask me for help, so I try to keep an extra eye out for her when I can.
     
  11. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Yes. It's especially troubling when the parents are educators... :(
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Seems the parents realized that there weren't really going to be any educational advantages to her having the label.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Definitely, but it is always something useful to know.
     
  14. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    The school can file due process on the parents, especially if the lack of services is detrimental to the student.


    gr8~could the child not qualify as ID?
     
  15. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    No, her IQ would be too high for that. She falls neatly into the 70's for IQ... too high for ID, too low to show a discepency. And the only way mom will sign off on SPED services is for LD or OHI, and there's nothing there for OHI.
     
  16. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Oct 11, 2013

    I've never had a parent refuse services once the testing was completed. I've had parents refuse initial testing though. I've also never known of our county filing due process on a parent. I had a big, strong, construction worker daddy cry hysterically when his son was diagnosed with a learning disability. It was something I will never, ever, ever forget. This was close to 5 years ago and I think about it multiple times per day. We never know what goes through the minds of these parents. They want the best for their children, but sometimes they think the best thing is just "fitting in" instead of getting the help they need.
     
  17. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Could you try ADHD/ADD? Doctors will label anyone with that. Might be worth a try to get her what she needs.:confused:
     
  18. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Oct 11, 2013

    Last year I had a parent agree to testing for her son. She came back a few hours later & said she changed her mind about the testing. At the end of the year, I tried to retain her son, after many conversations. Her response was to pull him out of our school and put him in a different school. Apparently, this school will get him on grade level and he will be back for 2nd grade. We'll see if he comes back.
     
  19. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Well dang.
     
  20. kevo2005

    kevo2005 Companion

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    If I had a dollar for every time I said this, I'd be rich. Low IQ isn't a disability. Not knowing much besides IQ, I'd possibly DNQ her. What is the disability???
     
  21. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 12, 2013

    Try having the school psych look at the subtest scores. Low block design scores tend to be indicative of ADHD and issues with executive functioning.
     
  22. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    She has low everything scores, but it's a consistent low.
     
  23. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Then she doesn't have a disability. She's just a slow learner.
     
  24. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    No, she fits all the criteria for an Emotional Disability. She just doesn't meet the criteria for Learning Disability or Other Health Impairment, which are the only levels mom would accept.
     

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