Have I shot myself in the foot?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Ghost, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Aug 18, 2008

    I'm in a new school starting a new class, but I'm not new to teaching. One of my kids is a brittle diabetic and her blood sugar levels have gone from extreme to extreme. She passed out and had a diabetic seizure Thursday and on Friday it was over 500--high enough she should have been hospitalized. Then today it was over 300 and when the nurse called her "mother" (long story) the woman had the nerve to say that the child is playing me...faking it to get out of school....and that I had a problem since I obviously couldn't take care of the child. And all of this is combined with the fact that we have NO doctor's orders, no blood sugar guidelines, no menu, and no action plan for low/high sugars. So, I was lucky to catch the district nurse/head of nursing as she was leaving a case conference and explained it to her. She agreed that it sounded like medical neglect...especially when the school nurse said that the mom claimed the doctor was not in charge of adjusting the child's insulin levels and that the mom did it herself. Hello? So I went to the AP, because the P was out of the building, and said that I need to make a call to child protective. He had me stay and he called and I explained the issue to the person on the phone. I know that the mom will be peeved at me and that does't bother me. What I am afraid of is that I've only been at this school for 6 days and we've had 2 medical emergencies with my student, plus I was in his office saying that I needed to call CPS. What must he think of me? Am I rocking the boat and endangering my job security??:eek:hmy:
     
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  3. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2008

    I don't think you are. If he's smart he thinks you are an awesome teacher who cares about her students.

    Imagine if you did nothing and this girl slipped into a coma, or God forbid, died while she was at school. It would come back to you.

    I would document all of this, make copies of these documentations and give to P, or AP, and leave the world's biggest paper trail. I'd also have called CPS. :)
     
  4. teachall

    teachall Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2008

    Good call. Considering the situation I think you are being proactive. You are trying to prevent this problem from reoccuring. I would think the admin would be supportive.
    I had a child last year with asthma, who abused the priviledge of using her inhaler daily. She would make herself wheeze. I began having her call her mother every time she needed to use it. This helped some and the school became involved and purchased an oxygen level reader.
     
  5. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2008

    If this child has NO plan there is something wrong and it needsto be addressed. If calling DCF will help her, then that is what needed to be done. Sounds like you are on top of things. Even if the "mother" is peeved, it is NOT your fault-- you are trying to do what is right for the child!!!!!!
     
  6. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Aug 18, 2008

    I wouldn't worry about your job. I think your admin would be MORE worried if months later a different teacher began realizing the medical neglect. You're doing your job - and a good one, at that!
     
  7. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Aug 18, 2008

    I agree with everybody else. NOT bringing this up would be cause for concern. You're doing the right thing.
     
  8. Rockys_Mom

    Rockys_Mom Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2008

    I would say given that you took the correct steps; Mom, nurse, the AP/P, you did everything in your ability to correct the matter before calling CPS. I'm pretty sure it's the same in every state, but here in WI we're legally required to report suspected abuse and have a LOT of justification needed if we don't and a situation happens.

    Just document, document, document. The AP should see that you've developed a close enough relationship with your students to notice something like that in 6 days and are willing to take the steps necessary to protect your students. When you have medically fragile children, you're going to have medical emergencies. They go hand in hand.

    Good luck! They'll see you're an awesome teacher looking out for the best interest of your students!!!
     
  9. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 18, 2008

    I think the AP and P will appreciate the effort you're taking to ensure your students remain safe while they are in your (and their) care. Diabetes can be VERY serious - and you are only doing what you know. How are you to know that the child is faking it? What if the child wasn't faking it and you didn't allow her to go to the nurse and she ended up on the floor? THEN the mother would be REAL mad (AND your principal). I think you're much better off being "reprimanded" by the mother for "overreacting" rather than under-reacting. If you suspect a child is involved in a medical emergency, you report it. You do what you need to do. You haven't done anything wrong. So what if CPS was called and the mom was upset. She's changing her child's insulin levels and the school has no medical/doctor documentation to allow that /agree with that.

    I say stand your ground and feel good about what you've done. Your principal is most likely feeling the same way you are if they agreed on the CPS call. If they didn't feel it was necessary, it wouldn't have happened. No worries. You've got a pain of a mother that is making things difficult... but honestly you're just being a good teacher who cares.

    Keep it up, don't let it get you down, and continue to be a great advocate for your students!
     
  10. Teach96

    Teach96 Comrade

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    Aug 18, 2008

    You are not rocking the boat. The AP has to see what we see and that is you are trying to do what is best for this child. You had to do whatyou did. The mother is not protecting her child from harm.

    _______
    my blog...www.lifeskilllessons.com/blog
     
  11. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Aug 20, 2008

    Thank you for the support! Fortunately the AP and P agreed with the call and backed me 100% when the "family" came in with two carloads of groceries for me to make the child's lunch every day. I've decided the mother is crazy at the least...no doctor in their right mind is going to tell anyone that it doesn't matter if the child's blood sugar is over 400! She bellowed, swore at me, contridicted herself multiple times (ie blood sugar is to be 80-180, and then don't call unless it's over 400 or under 50), tried to insist that I smell the child to determine high/low sugar (district nurse nixed that!!!!!!) and accused me of testing her too often (one time before lunch is what she said verbally, but on the action plan wrote that I should check her before & after exercise, before snack, 30 min. before she gets on the bus AND if she is very grumpy/cries a lot) and called today to make sure that I "knew" that the "doctor says" that I'm "sticking that child" way too much.

    Venting I know...the end result is that the family is sending in her lunch and the district nurse told me to test when I felt the child was acting odd, even if the parents say it's too often. The child was back to her "normal" range in the 200's today, so I guess it's worth putting up with momzilla to help the child.
     
  12. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Aug 20, 2008

    I can't believe that you are supposed to do all of this for the student. In schools around here that child in your class would have a health aide and she would be in charge of testing her, making sure she eats the right things, etc. It seems like you are given way too much work to do. Oh, and I bet they expect you to teach too! Good luck!
     
  13. Teach96

    Teach96 Comrade

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    Aug 20, 2008

    At our district also, we have a 1:1 aide for someone who is this medical unstable. I'd start asking your AP and P about getting this process started. She needs consistent medical attention to keep her from spiking. I wouldn't want this responsibility without the help of a paraprofessional that is trained to monitor her. Just my opinion.

    ________
    my blog...www.lifeskilllessons.com/blog
     
  14. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 20, 2008

    Same here. That sounds like a huge liability! I mean, you DO have other students to pay attention to.... I'd check into getting a 1:1 who is trained in this.

    At my school district, we never got 1:1 aides unless the kid was behaviorally out of control and a huge liability to the other kids, or the kid was multiply disabled and medically fragile. It was a budget thing (I know it's an "INDIVIDUAL DECISION" for each, but for the most part this was the case...)

    HOWEVER... kids who had diabetes/other conditions that required frequent monitoring -- had the health aide come down to the classroom to check on them at certain times. If the teacher feels concerned, they buzz the office and the nurse or health aide would come down. This type of thing did NOT fall in the hands of the teacher....
     

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