Has this ever happened to anyone else?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teach61, Nov 15, 2007.

  1. teach61

    teach61 Rookie

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    Nov 15, 2007

    I am wondering if this ever happened to anyone else and how they handled it-? Last Thursday, I informed my supervisor that I felt that I should resign my position because things weren't working out for me. (this is the short version). I let her know that I wanted to be sure to give proper notice, put it in writing, would make sure my files were in order, etc. On Friday morning, my supervisor called me to her office. One of the vps and the curriculum coordinator were there. At that time, they told me that I was "finished", and that I needed to pack up my things. I asked why, and they told me that "since I had indicated my desire to resign, this was district policy". I am leaving out alot, but I'm wondering-has this happened to anyone else and what did you do? I'm thinking I have grounds to sue them on several things- wrongful termination, etc. Has anyone sued their former school for something like this? Thank you for any and all help and advice!
     
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  3. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Nov 16, 2007

    Well, it's hard for us to really give sound advice when we don't know all the details. I'm also not familiar with New Hampshire laws. Is it a right to work state?
     
  4. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Nov 16, 2007

    In Texas many companies consider the day you give notice to be your last day. I heave never heard of a school doing this, but here it is a right to work state and they can let you go at any time. I would look up your state's worker's rights to find out more.
     
  5. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Nov 16, 2007

    Are you a new teacher? In MA schools (or maybe just alot of them?) it's in the contract that w/in the first 90 days you can be let go without a reason and without any fanfare on either side. "Trial period" kind of thing.
     
  6. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Nov 16, 2007

    I can see them doing this and it being legal because you DID indicate your decision to resign by saying you felt things weren't working out and you felt you needed to leave.
    She honored your request to resign by having you out the next morning. I would imagine the only thing you could fight is if the paperwork doesn't get done in a timely fashion. Many schools have a waiting list of qualified teachers waiting for our jobs so when we tell out principal that we feel we should resign, we need to realize that this typically means we are resigning. She probably thought she was being helpful.
     
  7. bjweyant

    bjweyant Rookie

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    Dec 3, 2007

    Did you resign? or just say that you thought you should? There is a difference. If you told them you wanted to resign - you're out. They may have done it a bit quickly, but they will be able to justify it in a hearing.

    If you said that you THOUGHT you should resign - talk to your union rep. That COULD be grounds for suing to get your position back (if you want it).

    Check the union contract and/or contact the teacher's union. THey will have better advice than any of us can give you. We aren't there and every district has different contractual agreements.

    Good Luck.
     
  8. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Dec 3, 2007

    If you expressed a desire to resign in the first place, why in the world would you want to sue for wrongful termination? Keep in mind, I don't know the whole story, but it would appear that it would be pointless to sue about losing a job you were prepared to resign from anyway.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 3, 2007

    I'm not sure exactly what you wanted the school to do.

    You said you wanted to resign. They're OK with that. Why is there a problem?

    From their point of view: they want a teacher in the classroom who plans to stay, to get involved with the kids, to have an ongoing relationship with the kids and the staff. Obviously if you're planning to leave, none of these things will be on your agenda. So they're letting you do as you asked, and will get someone into the classroom who wants to be there.

    Why on earth would YOU SUE THEM for allowing you to break your contract???
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 3, 2007

    Nontenured teachers in my district can be let go for no stated reason. Not sure how this would be wrongful termination- they were acting on the information that you gave about planning to resign. What did you want? Them to beg you to stay?

    Your post of October 29 stated:
    "I started the year with no special ed. supervisor (she got another position right before school started). So, in a new school, in a new state, I had no direction for almost 2 months of school. It has been HORRIBLE!!! From the second day of school, I have had to deal with angry parents, angry colleagues, and just a terribly stressful environment all around. I am at wits end... I want to quit- and not even use this place on my resume. But, I signed a contract, and have been told it could get nasty (they threaten me with lawsuit, etc.)."

    You've obviously wanted to leave for a while. Sounds like you were not a fit for this job. How can things have gone so wrong by day 2??? Get out, leave it behind you - you were warned it 'could get nasty'. It did. Leave it behind you. This wasn't wrongful termination- it sounds like everyone got what they wanted.
     
  11. kaymurr

    kaymurr Rookie

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    Dec 4, 2007

    Most companies I know let you go the day you tell them you're leaving. It's only a legal issue if they terminate you for something like they found out you were interviewing somewhere else. But even then they would probably prevail. Keeping an employee around who is planning to leave can be viewed as a liability.
     
  12. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Dec 4, 2007

    I've left two different jobs before that weren't the right fit for me and I never looked back and am now at my dream school. It's ok to say this is not for you and to leave. It's better than staying and doing a half-hearted job. Good for you!! You made your decision, now go explore and you may find yourself in a few more similar situations before your dream school finds you!! It's ok!
     
  13. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Dec 5, 2007

    I'm with cz and kay

    I have to agree with cz and kay...

    First of all, with all the disgruntled employees going around (going postal), killing, stealing, sabatoging things..etc., any good company can't afford to let you sit around until YOU are ready to leave. In fact, it is common practice to have a staff person or guard stand there over you, watch you clean out your desk, demand keys and id cards, and personally escort you to your car or at least out the door.

    They have an obligation to their customers (parents) and must protect their product (children). For all we know, you may decide to poision a few... :rolleyes:

    I am not trying to be mean...I have had my share of lousy jobs, bad firings, and the like.

    but it does sound like you have what you want, so why bother them any more???

    You know, I tried to sue a school for asking me a racist question, and they are still bothering me! Have the nerve to try to offer me the job, and EEOC keeps contacting me. I said I let it go, but now they won't. Everybody is getting lawsuit happy. Or trying to prove a point, knowing they are not sincere. Not worth it!

    Heck, I wouldn't even that schoolas a reference if you weren't there more than two months. In fact, the only time I would put them down would be to claim unemployment insurance, and for proof of teaching experiences when I was ready to renew my certificate.

    been there..know what it is like.

    so forget and forgive...let this be a learning experience.

    it is not you...it is them

    grow somewhere else...

    but next time, look before you leap...if it smells like a rat, looks like a rat, runs like a rat...don't keep wondering if it is a bunny rabbit.

    move on before you waste time and energy...and lose out on better opportunities.
     

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