Has anyone up and moved out of the US to another country?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Peachyness, Mar 30, 2010.

  1. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I have dual-citizenship since both of my parents were German when I was born here in America. In fact, my mom didn't become a citizen until I was 9.

    So, I'm getting ready to apply for my German passport and it got me thinking about moving to Europe.

    Was it hard for you, or for anyone you know, to just pick up and move to another country? Did you find a job beforehand or did you have to look after you moved there? My brother lived in Japan for a year and was finally able to, after three months of searching, find a job teaching English with a company.

    I have a cousin in Germany who runs a daycare and owns a three story house. I know they'd let me stay there and help out until I can find a real job. Just curious about you guys who have done this before. :)

    I like adventure and to try new things. I love to travel. I know German and am in the process of learning French. I also know quite a bit of Spanish, although, I really need to brush up on it.
     
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  3. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    My mother was born in the Wales and her side of the family lives all over Europe (Wales, England, Germany). I have visited twice. The last time I visited, it felt "right". I love my British heritage. I have considered moving to England to teach for a year or so. If I went, I wouldn't be surprised if I didn't return.

    So, when I read your post earlier, I started researching the dual-citizenship laws of the UK for about an hour or so! My mother was a UK citizen, but I was born in the US so I was/am a citizen by descent, but since my parents didn't register me before the age of 18, I believe I now only have the right of abode (unconditional right to live and work in the UK) and after five years, I could become a naturalised citizen. The laws are pretty senseless - my brothers were born before 1983, so they can register for citizenship at anytime even though they are now over 18 years of age, but since I was born in 1984, I only had until I was 18 to register. ??? Ugh.

    I know TamiJ moved to Mexico last year for a teaching position so maybe she'll share her experiences.
     
  4. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I think you guys know this, but I moved to Mexico this past JUly. I love it! My husband is Mexican, so of course that made things easier. While I can't say I went through a complete culture shock, some things have been a little irritating, like traffic in a city (I was not used to that), and just getting used to how to function in this country. Things such as: gas runs out and you have to get the tank replaced from the gas co., so you have to be willing to go a little while without gas. In any case, I am adjusting well. If you actually do the move, give yourself time to adjust. I went through a period when I missed the US a lot! Mainly I missed knowing what to do and how to do it and being able to communicate fluently and without thinking. Now that I have been here for about 9 months, it has only gotten easier and I don't feel afraid anymore and I don't feel like I can't do anything without my husband (I used him a lot as a crutch-if I hadn't relied on him so much in the beginning, I might have felt more comfortable sooner). My Spanish was already pretty good (although I spoke it infrequently), but here my vocabulary has grown so much. I can bargain with vendors and even if I lack a word, I know how to express what I want to say essentially, so I don't have to worry. It has been an exciting experience, and I am thinking about looking into going to Spain maybe in the future. Let us know what you decide to do!
     
  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Oh, and I had a job lined up before I left. I think that would be the easiest thing for someone to do. In my case, the school did all the immigration stuff for me, so all I had to do was show up, and sign when they asked me. The school also paid for my working papers, which are good for 1 year. In 3 years I can go for my citizenship.
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Peachy~I would love to move to the UK and teach there for a few years. I don't know if I could live there forever though. My family is from Wales and some of them go back every year to visit the ruins of a couple of homes that the family owned. If you do move, I'd love to come visit. ;) And I think I would be more comfortable having a job lined up.
     
  7. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    When I moved from Michigan to California, if FELT like I moved to another country....
     
  8. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    lol...That's so funny! California is my home state... :cool:
     
  9. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    TamiJ, don't you have children? How did the transition go for them? Does your husband have family in the area? It sounds so exciting - moving to another country...well, just simply moving sounds exciting. I have always "dreamed" of moving away from my hometown and since I'm single, without any children (have a dog), not in a relationship, I know I should jump at the opportunity. I know I've mentioned on posts in the Jobseekers forum, of how intrigued I am at even moving to another state!

    My head is spinning from all the research I've been doing. :dizzy: I have discovered that I am also a UK citizen since my mother was born in the UK. It seems that those born after Jan 1 1983, don't have to register their citizenship at all, but those born before that date must register. Silly. This of course, all applies to those that were born outside the UK to a parent with UK citizenship. I seem to remember my mother mentioning that I am also a UK citizen and I displayed the typical daughter behavior or rolling my eyes and saying "yeah right, Mom." My mother always encouraged me to embrace my British heritage. I believe she thought I wasn't when in actually reality, I was. Anyhow, I checked about getting my UK passport and I have all the documents needed.

    The cool thing about having the citizenship in the other country is that it would make working there that much "easier."

    Go for it, Peachyness! I'm definitely considering it myself!
     
  10. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    I don't see myself moving to another state, not that it's impossible, much less another country. I know people do it all the time, but I'd miss CA too much.

    If my loved ones & I could one day live in another country for at least a few mos & not worry about money, how we'd work, live, etc., you know like a fantasy, it would be intereesting to do.


    Speaking of this topic & not to hijack, but has anyone been an exchange student & if so, where & how was it? :)
     
  11. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    If you have family there, I think that would make ALL the difference.

    While I've not moved, My husband moved to the States from England, and well..things have not ended well for us. We are in the process of getting a dissalutionment, mostly b/c it was a lot tougher on him than either of us ever imagined. And yes we talked about me going there, but I'd never be able to live away from my family.

    Little things drove him nuts. commericals. the food. he is a pretty stubborn guy so that didn't help.

    But do expect it to be tough though.
     
  12. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Yes, we have an 8 year old. At first she wasn't sure what to think. New country, new school, new everything. In the beginning, the Spanish drove her and I both crazy because it was everywhere (and we are used to it being from CA, being that my hubby is Mexican and my daughter is half Mexican and fully bilingual), but slowly we have gotten used to it. Plus, we have the internet where we have been able to watch our US shows, so no real loss. Oh, and I always listened to Spanish music in the states because I grew to love it after being with my husband, so I don't mind that aspect either. My husband's family is about an hour away from here, so it does help because they are close. At first, when we got here, they were the only ones we knew. However, it's funny how quickly you meet people and make friendships. Yesterday a couple of girlfriends and I went to the lake and stayed there all day, which makes me laugh thinkin back to July when I knew no one here, and all of a sudden I have friends I cherish. Moving to another country does not have to be a crazy idea (although many people in CA thought I was crazy!) because so many people do it. All of our English speaking teachers are from various parts of the world since instruction is all English. We have teachers from England, Australia, and the US (I think that's it for now). One couple who is here is here with their 4 children and are moving to Venezuela in the summer where they will be teaching next year. My husband and I are thinking we might try out Spain in a few years. We'll see. I love my school and am not ready to move, but you really get a very different perspective by living in another country. There is a whole world out there, and it is nice to see and experience it. Oh, and back to our daughter. She has adjusted nicely. She misses CA, but she has good friends here now and has had a chance to get close to my hubby's side of the family and will miss them all greatly when we go back.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    That sounds about right to me.

    My guess is that in about 1983 they started computerizing the records.
     
  14. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    Well, I'm not to sure it's really related to the records being computerized. My brothers and I were born in the US and have lived in the US our entire lives. When we were born, the UK didn't receive any record that one of their citizens had children born outside the UK so there was nothing to be computerized on their behalf. The record that shows I'm also a UK citizen is my US birth certificate, which shows my mother's birthplace being in the UK. Even though UK citizenship by descent is "automatic", there are regulations for when you want to legally claim it in order to get your UK passport. This is where the whole "born outside the UK before or after Jan 1 1983" comes into play. If you were born before that date, you need to register your citizenship to get a certificate so you can apply for your passport, but if you were born after, sending a couple documents (applicants birth certificate and the birth certificate of the parent you're claiming citizenship through) along with the passport application will suffice.

    I don't know if that helps at all to explain why I don't believe it's related to records being computerized. All I know is that there were many revisions to their citizenship requirements in the early 2000s and it changed the application regulations. I'm still trying to wrap my head around it. It seems to me that if the country offers dual citizenship through citizenship by descent, if the applicant has their birth certificate and their parent's birth certificate, all showing the parent's place of birth being that country, those should be the main documents required to officially claim that citizenship. It wouldn't take much effort at all for my brother's to register their citizenship, just extra time. Not that they would ever want to...they wouldn't even stop to think about being a dual citizen. It's given me a major headache with trying to figure it all out!
     
  15. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Anytime you deal with immigration matters it becomes a headache (i.e. citizenship, etc.).
     
  16. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Awww... hugs!

    Well, the first thing for me to do is to visit the closest German consulate. I plan to call them tomorrow to set up an appointment. My dad will come with me with all of the documents. He did the same for my brother and had no problems.
     
  17. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Oh, I'm sure moving to any new area is tough. Heck, I've already moved about 21 times so far in my life. I'm used to starting all over, making new friends, etc. Moving to a new country would be tough, but I'm such a gutsy person, I'm sure after a while, like Tami, I would get used to it. Plus, pretty much my whole family lives in Germany (my grandparents, cousins, second cousins, aunts, etc). So that will really help.
     
  18. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    having family will help for sure! AND Europe has such better sweets than the states. My family ordered 2 cases of Kinder Eggs for Easter. Good chocolate and fantastic engineered toys, makes my day! lol
     
  19. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    :D:lol: Yes, I love it when my grandparents send me a package from Germany for my birthday full of fun yummy things!! :)
     
  20. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    Mmm...kinder eggs! I've been thinking about all the European goodies throughout the day. I especially love Crunchie bars.
     
  21. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    When my husband got naturalized, he gave up his English citizinship. Has that changed?
     
  22. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    Blue - Dual citizenship between the USA and UK is recognized. I remember seeing a section for UK citizens to renounce their citizenship (who would do that?). Perhaps giving up the other citizenship was once required when becoming a US citizen and now it's an option. I'm sure if this is the case, the governments would allow those to reclaim their citizenship that became US citizens under the former regulations.
     
  23. scienceteach82

    scienceteach82 Cohort

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    I'd do anything to leave the US...I've always wanted to live somewhere else in the world.
     
  24. Liljag

    Liljag Companion

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    Dual citizenship is allowed between most countries..the only thing is that (according to the US), you cannot vote in the other country that you claim citizenship in or your US citizinship becomes null. Then your family has to reapply for you.
     

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