Has anyone passed over a district due to fear?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Rainbowbird, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Jul 3, 2012

    I live near a district where I am pretty sure I could get hired. They are always advertising. The pay is lower than anywhere else me, and it is a priority district and has been taken over by the state. They are paying a new head a quarter mil while the teachers make some of the lowest salaries in the state. Teachers are leaving whenever they can and I have heard the horror stories of people having to reinterview for their jobs. I feel like I would rather sub than work in a place like that.

    So I am holding out and hoping for other interviews. Anyone else feel the same?
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I've passed on a couple of interviews because of the reputation of the district, but only if I've already had a job. If I'd only been subbing, I'd take what I can get. Worst case scenario, I kept up on my interviewing skills.
     
  4. chasisaac

    chasisaac Comrade

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    Just based on where I live, I have passed on Indian Reservation Schools, every year all of them seem to look for the same teachers. My last job had 60%+ American Indian population. My next school has about the same.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    I've never passed up on applying for a job. I like to interview and ask questions. If I didn't feel that the job was the right fit for me, I would turn it down. It's hard to work somewhere that you don't love.

    Teaching is hard enough, you should be able to love what you do!
     
  6. LuvKinder

    LuvKinder Rookie

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    I agree that you should be happy and comfortable in the place you work. But just seeing the other side, you don't want to look back and wonder what if? That is the worst feeling. Going on an interview never hurts and who knows it might be a right fit for YOU!
     
  7. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    In NJ, the state run districts pay the most in the state. 10,000 to 15,000 more in some cases (not all).
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    There is a district near me that I passed over because I have had experience subbing, and student teaching in the district, and the interviews I've had there have been horrible. Every experience I've had in that district has been horrible, and I simply did not apply when it came time to look for jobs. Still if you need to eat, you need to eat.
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I teach at a failing school in an almost-failing district. It's not easy. I'm sure you could easily find many posts of mine outlining my frustrations.

    Schools like mine aren't for everyone. I really believe that it takes a special kind of person. Not a better person, mind you, just a different kind of person, one who can handle repeated setbacks, limited successes, and still keep chugging along. I have my moments where I'm not sure how long I'll be able to keep going at it. Most of the time, however, I am pleased with my choices.

    My school is currently switching to a turnaround model. The principal has been replaced, the bell schedule will changed to add in a lot more professional development time, some special programs are being implemented, and lots of other changes are on their way. All the teachers on staff had to agree to participate in those changes--we had the option to "opt out", i.e., go to another school without any negative recourse or penalty. Almost all my colleagues and I chose to stay. It's not because there aren't problems, because, trust me, there are lots of problems. We chose to stay because we believe in what we do, we believe in our students, and we believe that the changes going into effect are going to have some positive results. If I'm being totally honest, there's also a little "fear of the unknown" in there for some folks, causing them to avoid moving elsewhere.

    If you're certain that you won't enjoy working with at-risk students in a difficult setting, then you should pass on this job. If you're willing to take a chance, however, then I think you should go for it. I never would have thought that a setting like the one I work in would be the place for me, but it kind of is. Despite my many complaints and frustrations, I really do enjoy working with this sort of student population. I'm very glad that I had this sort of opportunity, especially as my first teaching experience.
     
  10. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Thanks, everyone. It is not the students that concern me. It's the low morale and the way the staff are treated. If I were starving, yes, I'd deal with the issues there. But for now I'm passing. But never say never! It was interesting to read your responses!
     
  11. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Wow, not here. Not that salary is everything, but along with all the trials those teachers endure, it is nice to feel appreciated. This district is amongst the lowest in the state. It's sad. I know there are some great teachers there, but they are underpaid while the state-appointed admins. are taking away huge six-figure salaries. It is quite the furor right now. These admins. and the politicians who put them there are connected to corporations. It really smells fishy to me.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Our "inner city" districts tend to pay more than the suburban ones. I passed over applying to a district I'd done a lot of practicums with in college. It was a low ses area, but not that much different than what I work in now, and I agree the students weren't the problem. I had been in 4 of the 5 elementary schools in the district and they were all just awful places to work. Morale was extremely low, principals were AWFUL, mean and hateful, and teachers were so burnt out. All they did all day every day was practice for state tests, all year long. Reading time- get out released test passages and questions. Math time- work on released questions. It was the same for every subject. At one school in particular I was teaching reading for 2 hours a day each morning, and as soon as I walked out the door for the day I would just breathe a huge sigh of relief because my CT was so overbearing and awful. They had a lot of open positions each year and my college had a good reputation for education in the area, so I would have had a good shot- possibly the only shot I had at staying in my home state. However, I just could not bring myself to apply there under any circumstances. I applied to states 1,000 miles away while never applying in this district!
     
  13. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    Jul 4, 2012

    I find myself looking at ethnic makeup, test scores, number of violent incidents, and location. If it's going to take two hours, or a lot of walking in the dark , then the school's not for me
     
  14. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

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    I decided to interview at districts that weren't ideal after I'd been rejected by a few schools in my choice district. I had calls for a lot of interviews but only went to one before I was hired in my choice district. I would have taken the job if offered at the lower district as it was still higher than my former charter school and closer to home. I would still apply because a job is a job and the experience is worth it for at least a year.
     
  15. HOPE-fulTeacher

    HOPE-fulTeacher Comrade

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    Test scores and "ethnic makeup" aren't necessarily good factors in determining whether a school would be good to work at. I was a little offended by this...I'm hoping that you aren't suggesting that diverse schools or schools with low test scores are ones to avoid.

    As a single girl on the smaller side, however, I do agree with you that I need to be in a safe area that doesn't have a whole lot of violent crime.
     
  16. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Exactly. Students are students wherever you go. I've only worked at high-needs school districts in urban areas, and I've loved ALL of my students. It's the staff atmosphere and environment that tends to be the issue, and it's sad to think that you are leaving these students to learn in these sometimes sub-par learning environments because of how some of the teachers and admin behave and teach, but I'm a new teacher, and I'm realistic enough to know that I'm not going to come into a place and change it miraculously with my idealism and work ethic.

    Good luck with the schools you are applying to, and I hope you get hired!
     
  17. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I have. The next city over from mine has a horrible reputation and has rifed teachers every year for as long as I can remember. Job security is big for me and I know people who have been in the district for 10 years that have been rifed. They recently rifed a lot of administrators and allowed them to go back into the classroom. Which means they will have even less teachers called back for next year.
     
  18. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Jul 6, 2012

    I too look at job security. There are a couple of districts around here that I would not apply to simply because I know that every year they RIF teachers. They've RIF'd teachers with 7-8 yrs experience in the district. They start at the bottom & go up. This year is the 1st year that they didn't do that. It was based on some other formula that they had come up with.
     
  19. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Jul 8, 2012

    There is NO job security in public education anymore. It's a tragedy, but it is the truth. Not that there ever was, for principals can pretty much fire you anyway regardless of whether or not you have tenure. However, the reforms have undermined protections to the point you can't count on a "career" lasting more than two or three years tops. Those with more are being hounded out of their careers because they "cost too much."
     

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