Has anyone been through chemo and/or radiation?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Aliceacc, Dec 5, 2010.

  1. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 5, 2010

    One of my close friends was diagnosed with endometrial cancer a few weeks ago. She had a hysterectomy the week before Thanksgiving. Her type is appararently pretty rare. It has a 50% rate of reappearing if she doesn't have chemo and radiation, so both are being scheduled.

    She's the mom of a 10 and a 14 year old, and she's terrified.

    I'm hoping for anything at all that will help her, to get through radiation or chemo -- any hints or ideas that will smooth the way for her. I had suggested that she join the Disney thread that was sucha huge help to me, but she's done some hunting on the internet and is now afraid to go near it--- way too much scary info there. I've posted a plea for help there, and I'll edit out the scary stuff and forward it to her.

    My radiation was up on top, so my hints on sports bras and blazers aren't of much use. And I was fortunate enough not to need chemo.

    She's going to have her head shaved, and a wig made to look like her own hairstyle in the next week or so, before she loses her hair.

    Any other hints/ resources/ anything??

    I'm hoping you can help me help Alicia.
     
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  3. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Dec 5, 2010

    My cousin just finished (in the past year) radiation, chemo and a double masectomy with her expanders put in. She is having a hysterectomy next month.

    She said radiation wasn't as bad as she was expecting but chemo was SO bad. I can ask her for some hints about her wig and chemo if you'd like.

    My heart goes out to your friend. And also much respect to you for your struggles. Watching my cousin this year has really shown me how strong people can really be.

    Edit for awkward phrasing
     
  4. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    My mother went through treatments with her cancer. I am not sure of exactly which ones. But, she was sickest on the 3rd day after treatment.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    She's got you to help keep her in life, Alice: that's likely to go rather far right there.
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    You might tellher to hold off shaving her head. My aunt went through a full round of chemo without losing any hair on her head. She had almost shaved it right before chemo, but was sure glad she didn't.
     
  7. basswife

    basswife Rookie

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    I agree about waiting to shave her hair off. I had choriocarcinoma, a rare cancer from a pregnancy. The 1st type of chemo that I had was in pill form and I didn't lose my hair. However, it started not working and I went to a stronger chemo that did cause me to lose my hair. This was a VERY emotional thing to a person who had not had a real haircut for over 10 years!
    I think that the biggest Godsend for me was joining and participating in an online support group. I was one of the few who had been diagnosed with the actual cancer, but there were others there whose disease (gestational trophoblastic disease) was being treated the same. I actually became very informed on the topic and personally feel that I was more up to date on it that my ob/gyn. I was 22 at the time and my local family and friends didn't quite know how to handle the situation. I felt isolated and the online support group just really met my needs. There are lots of support groups out there in cyber-world. Yahoogroups and Facebook might be a place for her to check out for her own particular type. These groups may also be familiar with the particular chemo and side effects that she will have. People there will be able to tell her what to look out for, who the top specialist is, and will even be a cheerleader for her.

    You've been there. Maybe not with chemo, but you've been there with the fear and the heartache. Sometimes all that we can do is be there for our friends and just keep on going. Remind her that brighter days are ahead. The sunshine comes after the rain.
     
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    There are ginger lollipops called Preggipops that are marketed towards pregnant women with morning sickness. I had some left over so I unwrapped them and gave them to my late husband when he got sick. They helped a bit.

    If they have any plug in air fresheners, she might want to unplug those. Most scents/cooking food made my husband worse.

    Prayers and best wishes for your friend.
     
  9. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    I can't help much because I have only had one treatment, but smells have been the worse for me. Certain foods & perfumes have made me really nauseated. My third day was also the worse. I am doing chemo only. I wish the best for your friend.
     
  10. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    Some of my moms favorite foods no longer tasted good. Since she was losing weight I made her meals with high calories.
    If she gets sores in her mouth there is a special mouthwash - don't use regular mouthwash! You can get it from the doctor. If she gets a metallic taste in her mouth tell her to use plastic forks/spoons and such.
    It was always cold in the rooms where my mom had chemo so we always brought a blanket. Tell her to drink plenty of fluids so everything will go through her, my mom kept getting dehydrated.

    She is in my prayers.
     
  11. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    My mom also did not lose her hair with the chemo, so I second that advice.

    I'll keep her in my prayers, as well.
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    OK, in case anyone is using this as a resource, here's what I've found so far on chemo: (I think I'll mail it to her, as a "Do not open until needed" package. Or maybe I'll purchase some of the things on it, and send it as a care package.

    1. The hiccups themselves can range from an occasional hiccup that is similar to a hiccup combined with a burp to all the time hiccups that last for days, even while sleeping in some cases. The milder form is not very problematic. Just an occasional thing in groups of one or two to release some of the gas pressure in the abdomen. The other kind, however, can be very annoying. If not to you then to a spouse or loved one trying to sleep! There is help, though.

    Most patients report being prescribed Thorazine, and that this cleared up the problem right away. This is a good reminder that no matter how silly or inconsequential something seems, if it bothers you, ask your doctor about it. There is no reason to live with an inconvenience or annoyance if the problem can be simply solved.



    2. Fatigue:
    There are many things you can do to cope with the fatigue. I can't promise you to be rid of it, I haven't found a miracle cure, but there are things that can be done to manage it.

    1) Consider getting a temporary handicap hang-tag if you do a lot of walking that could be avoided. Exercise is nice, but if it is interfering with your productivity and quality of life, you may need to rethink this. I got mine because I was walking over a mile to and from school. This led to three hour naps and an inability to focus in class. I can now park next to the buildings and my grades returned to pre-cancer levels and I have more time to do things at home.

    2) Have a friend or family member help with the housework. I had a friend come by once a week to help catch up with dishes and vacuuming and take me to the Laundromat. Again, I could have done it all on my own, but if I had I would also not have been able to focus on school or friends as the energy needed to do that would have been used up washing silverware and chasing dust-bunnies. Your friends want to help, let them. Enjoy your time as much as you can.

    3) Take a nap. Schedule a nap for an hour a day. Even with the extra help you'll still be tired and this should allow you to stay up later into the evening and still feel alert. If you are continuing to work, I would ask for an extended lunch so that you can both eat and nap. I think that your boss will find you more productive if they give you 90 minutes rather than 45-60. Don't sleep more than an hour though as that may mess up your night sleep leading to more fatigue. Gauge your body. You may only need a thirty minute breather.

    4) Remember to rest often. Pace yourself. I find that I allow myself an extra 20 minutes to get places so that I can stop and rest of I need to. When I go to the mall I rest on benches. When I go to the grocery store I buy less each trip or I take someone with me to help me push the cart so that I don't use my energy up that way. Don't stand for long periods of time. That is often more tiring than walking.

    5) Remember to rest when you start to feel tired rather than after you are exhausted. It's just like the nausea drugs: if you wait until you feel sick it is too late to do anything about it.

    6) Join a support group. This will help you decrease the stress in your life. You can try a usenet group on the internet like alt.support.cancer, or the Hodgkin's Mail List, or maybe a group in your hospital. Anything that helps you to feel better will help you regain energy.

    7) Eat properly. I know it is hard, especially with the various chemicals doing odd things, but try. If you eat healthy you will have more stamina and be more alert. If you can't eat because of nausea or taste bud problems, please see the sections on those topics for pointers. Otherwise, try to avoid caffeine in the evenings, taking a protein supplement like Carnation Instant Breakfast Drink, and/or eat a lot of cheese and warm milk. For whatever reason, cheese and milk have something in them that helps you to relax. It's done wonders for me on many an occasion.

    8) If prednisone gets you up at night (hungry otherwise) try to take it all in the morning/early afternoon. If you get it all in by 2 p.m. you should have fewer sleep problems. If you have to get up to use the bathroom a lot at night, try drinking less in the evenings and more in the afternoons so that you can be more restful at night.



    3. HAIR LOSS:

    If you decide that a wig is best for you, it is best to get it *before* your hair falls out. That way the color can be matched as closely as possible to your own hair color. Of course, you may decide that this is a great opportunity to try out a new color. Ever wonder what it would be like to be a blonde, brunette or redhead? Now's your chance to find out! The American Cancer Society (1-800-ACS-2345) can help you with this process. They also have a great catalog of hats and turbans! Look them up in your local phone book to request the catalog, or use the 800 number provided here.

    The ACS will also provide cancer patients a terrycloth turban free of charge. This is great for wearing around the house. Remember, most of your body heat escapes through your head. In an effort to not get sick and to stay warm, it is best to keep your head covered...that's what the hair is there for after all! I wore my hats even before my hair started falling out specifically to keep my head warm. I continue to wear them now that it is growing back and wore them throughout treatment even though I had a lot of hair. You don't realize the difference they make until you try them!

    It is not always necessary to buy a real wig. Synthetic wigs can look as good and are less expensive, easier to care for, lighter in weight and may be more comfortable to wear.
    Before possible hair loss, some people like to cut their hair short. The hair loss won't be quite so shocking if there is less hair to lose.

    Put a towel over your pillow so that clean up in the morning will be easier while you are shedding your hair.

    Buy a drain catch for your shower. Other people choose to shave their head hair when hair loss begins.

    Refer to our wig information sheet for places to shop near you.
    Refer to the Friend to Friend Gift Shop or the Cancer Resource Center for more information.
    When buying a wig, take a friend for emotional support and maybe even a laugh!
    Some health insurance policies cover the cost of a hairpiece that is bought due to cancer treatment. It is also a tax-deductible expense. Be sure to check your policy and ask your doctor for a "prescription."
    4. Mouth Sores:
    The first thing to know is that not everyone will get mouth sores. The second thing to know is that although they aren't pleasant, they can be dealt with fairly easily.

    The first signs you have that there is a problem will probably come from being extra sensitive to foods that are particularly spicy, sour, or acidic. In time, actual sores may develop, similar to cold sores, and it may be painful to brush your teeth or to use mouthwash (consult with your dentist about non-alcoholic mouthwashes). In my case, I first noticed a problem when the gums around my left molars started to hurt when I brushed my teeth. Although it hasn't progressed further than that yet, I have taken steps to prepare myself in case it does. Some things you can do to help the problem include:

    1) Brush your teeth often. It is very important to keep your mouth and teeth clean while you are taking chemotherapy. Buy a brush with soft bristles (you may want to forego electric toothbrushes as they tend to be harsher to the gums), use warm water, and use a good tarter-control toothpaste. It is best to brush your teeth any time you eat something, but at least 3 times a day. In addition, do not floss or use waterpiks if you are having trouble with bleeding due to a low white count. Not only will you further irritate your gums but you could have a serious problem getting your gums to stop bleeding.

    2) Do not use alcoholic mouth rinses. Oral-B makes a great non-alcoholic fluoride rinse, and your dentist can write you a prescription for something stronger. You can also use a baking soda and water mixture (one teaspoon baking soda per 8 ounces of water) to rinse your mouth. It not only serves the purpose of a mouthwash, but it will soothe your aching gums.

    3) Keep your lips moist with Blistex, Vaseline, ChapStick, or some other product. I became lax at this for a few days, and sure enough a sore developed on my lower lip. This will also help you to avoid bleeding problems on your lips if they become so dry they start to crack.

    4) Your diet. This really depends upon the person. If you have severe problems, you will want to avoid any foods that are too hot or too cold. Lukewarm, room temperature type foods will be best. You also will want to stick with smooth foods that you don't have to chew. Puddings, jellos, or, my favorite, baby food. Don't be embarrassed to eat baby food. It is just adult food pureed. You can puree it yourself in a blender, but I'm usually too tired to do this. So, it is Gerber for me. Hawaiian Delight is my favorite dessert! The Blueberry Buckle is great too. You get great nutrition from the stuff, so enjoy (and no, you don't have to make the airplane or choo-choo noises when you eat it!). [further food hints should soon be available to the recipes section]

    5) An easy hint. Use a straw when you drink liquids. This will help to transport the liquid to the back of your throat without touching the problem areas. Milk can be soothing as it coats, and if you are having problems eating you can kill two birds with one stone by adding Carnation Instant Breakfast to the milk. If you drink three packets a day you will get your total daily protein requirements. I find that the strawberry flavor dissolves easier than the chocolate in the milk. Also, avoid tomato and orange juices as their acid content is high; replace them with grape or apple juices.

    If all that doesn't work there is something called 'Magic Mouthwash' that will. This is something that should be used when you notice white sores in your mouth (sometimes called Thrush). They will be the color of paste. Call your doctor and she will give you a mouthwash of Kaeopectate, Benadryl, and Lidocaine that will solve the problem in 2-5 days (depending on how long you decided to wait to call). It doesn't taste very nice, but it *works*! Please call at first signs of the sores as they only get worse!

    Brush your teeth with a soft toothbrush three times daily.
    Rinse your mouth with a solution of one teaspoon baking soda and one teaspoon of salt, diluted in a glass of lukewarm water, three or four times daily.
    Most commercial mouthwashes contain alcohol. You can ask your health care provider about mouthwashes that are not irritating to your mouth.
    Ulcer-ease is a commercial product that may provide temporary relief from sores.
    5. Nauseau:

    How to Avoid Nausea:
    There a re a few things that can help to avoid nausea in addition to taking the drugs, and after you stop taking them. These include:

    1) Eat smaller meals 5 times a day rather than 3 large ones. This will prevent you from eating too much and getting that "too full" feeling talked about earlier.

    2) Eat bland foods that won't upset your stomach: mashed potatoes, ice cream, crackers, cream soups, etc.

    3) If you are sensitive to smells stay out of the kitchen while food is cooking and eat cold foods like salads and fruit that won't have the strong smells that meats and sauces might.

    4) Liquid intake is very important but some things may not taste right. Try drinking warm 7-Up and ginger ale if you are nauseated, water, and clear juices. Juice popcicles are another way to get juice without having to drink liquids.

    5) Open windows to make sure the air is fresh. Mild exercise such as an easy walk may also help.

    Before your chemotherapy appointment, eat a small, light meal. Most people do better if they have something in their stomach.
    Eat what sounds good to you. Generally starches such as rice, bread, potatoes, hot cereals and puddings are well tolerated.
    Try not to skip meals. An empty stomach will worsen all symptoms. If you don't feel like sitting down to a meal, try nibbling on something that appeals to you.
    Drink plenty of fluids. Herbal teas, water, sports drinks and diluted juices are recommended more than soda.
    Avoid smells that are unappealing.
    Freeze meals so that you don't have to cook. Ask your family and friends to help with meals, especially following chemotherapy when you are most likely to feel nauseous.
    Schedule a free appointment with the dietitian by calling (415) 885-3693 for more practical tips on dealing with nausea.

    6. Practical Hints for Constipation
    To help prevent constipation, drink eight to 10 glasses of fluid a day.
    Take a stool softener (not a laxative) such as ducosate sodium (DSS), also known as Colace, one tablet once or twice a day. Senekot or Senekot-S also may be suggested. Ask your doctor or nurse for a recommendation.
    Stay as active as you can. Consistent regular exercise can reduce constipation.
    If you can tolerate them, try high-fiber foods such as prunes, bran, fruits and vegetables.

    Practical Hints for Diarrhea
    To replenish lost fluids, drink eight to 10 eight-ounce glasses of non-caffeinated fluids per day.
    If your rectum is sore, use soft toilet paper and A&D ointment (used for diaper rash in infants) or Anusol, which can help numb the rectum and soothe soreness.
     
  13. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Dec 6, 2010

    Alice, one thing I remembered: Ask people for specific help. Many people will just say, "Let me know if I can do something" just because they don't know what you need. My mom had a hard time doing it, but started asking people for things (such as, "Would you mind dropping off something for dinner one day this week?"). It sounds kind of strange, but it made a big difference when she started feeling worse (and people really did want to know what they could do to help!). (Of course, it's a reminder to others to be specific when offering help, too.)
     
  14. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    I have no advice to offer but I can offer prayers for her and her family.
     
  15. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    We were also very careful how many people were around my mom due to germs and such.
     
  16. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 7, 2010

    Thanks for the help so far folks; keep it coming!

    As far as food goes, her sisters have been covering that. And a bunch of us from school collected just over $200 and a bunch of take out menus from her neighborhood; she can call in an order and her husband or one of her sisters can pick it up.

    I think I'm going to talk to "the girls" at work about this Chemo Care Package.

    As to the hair loss: she's having 6 rounds, 3 days each, 3 weeks apart. SHe had a port installed yesterday. It sounds to me like that's some serious chemo, and she's firm on the idea of the wig and shaved head.

    But we can get her some turbans to keep warm during a NY winter, and a good collection of scarves.

    Also, in case anyone else is using this as a resource, I found that Aquaphor ointment was a big help when I had radiation burns, so I'll include some of that.

    Slight TMI alert:
    I was also thinking of cotton maternity underwear, since her abdomen is likely to be sore from the radiation (I think; I'm not sure of the angles they'll be dealing with.) I'm thinking it will be loose and soft enough, but still do the job. Anyone have any input?
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 7, 2010

    More info from the Disboards:

    " I'm so sorry to hear about your friend. Like anything that we are afraid of - the more information we have the less afraid of it we become. Although breast cancer and endometrial cancer are different, maybe the experiences are similar. I did have to have chemo and rads. Since you had rads, I'll just give a few hints on the chemo side of things although different chemos do different things to ones body. STAY HYDRATED. Both inside and out. That can relieve a lot of the side effects that come from chemo. Keep the skin moist, lips moist, use eye drops etc. Drink, drink, drink until she is sloshing. This is especially important the day before, of and after the chemo infusion. Keep the teeth and mouth squeaky clean so she doesn't get thrush or mouth problems and use a non-alcohol mouth rinse twice a day. Rinsenol too works well if she develops mouth sores. Constipation can be a problem and should be treated quickly. I ate prunes every day and except for two days - yep - those two days it was a problem.

    There are other things that one can do so that chemo - while it isn't a walk in the park - isn't the horrendous thing that people make it out to be. I worked through my chemo treatments, as many people here have. If you do things to help alleviate the problems ahead of time it can help a lot. But she has to have that information and know what she is getting into."
     
  18. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Dec 7, 2010

    I didn't have chemo, but I had immunotherapy, basically a reverse chemo... has many of the same side effects (thankfully not the loss of hair, though)... Mine was a drip of drugs every 6-ish hours (i think... don't really remember) for 5 days, out for a week, then back in for another week. the meds made me VERY nauseous and also I retained a ton of water. I had a hard time keeping ANY food down (and the food service people wouldn't believe me so they made me put my food orders in anyway), so had a lot of applesauce and the like. Ginger ale wasn't normally an option, but the nurses knew that was all my stomach could take, so they took some from the children's ward and kept it on hand for me up there... the ginger in it really soothed the nausea.

    I also retained a LOT of water when I was in there... I'm not sure if that's ypical of chemo or not... but it really helped me to have simple to put on and take off clothing (pj pants, button-up t-shirts, etc)... they didn't make me wear a gown while I was there, fortunately, but I still needed stuff that was easy to handle. I had to wear my flip-flop type shoes home and for the next few days beacuse my feet swelled so much I couldn't fit in my gym shoes ;)
     
  19. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 7, 2010

    Thanks for the info.

    Scary, isn't it, how many of us have first hand experience in this???


    A bunch of us are putting together a care package. I've spoken to a bunch of teachers today-- my usual crowd (and Alicia's) and a bunch of people who are in different social circles, asking them to spread the word.

    I figure I'll give it about a week, then call and let her know I'm dropping it off.
     
  20. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Alice, that is a wonderful thing that you are doing for your friend. I would love for someone to do that for me.,_
     
  21. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oh, DHE, I wish we were nearby.

    Going through something like this is just so very awful. As a mom, the first and overwhelming fear is "I've got to get well. My kids NEED a mom. "That's the fear that kept me up at night, it's what's keeping Alicia awake, and I suspect it's cost you a night or two of sleep. It doesn't matter how old our kids are, they still need us.

    And every time someone says "It will be all right" all you want to do is yell "But you don't KNOW that!!!!!" If you could be assured of a happy ending, then the ordeal wouldn't be nearly so horrid.

    Know that you're in our thoughts and prayers. It's a horrible thing to have to go through. You keep telling yourself you have to be brave, when all you want to do is curl up into a ball and cry until you can't cry anymore.

    Hang in there. Let us know how we can help, even if it's just to vent about how incredibly unfair it is that fate has dumped this on you.
     
  22. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Dec 7, 2010

    Alice, I think people say 'It'll be alright' because they don't know exactly what to say, but think they need to say something. I know a lot of people said that to my mom and to us as well. Turns out, it wasn't alright.

    DHE~I wish we were closer! :hugs:

    And DHE and Alice, know that we're praying for you and your friend.
     
  23. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Dec 7, 2010

    Alice, you are so right, there are so many things that go through your mind in these times. At times it feels like a bad dream, but I have a wonderful support system. I know that I have to fight this for my children
     
  24. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I know, and I understand. It's an attempt to make the sick person feel hopeful. And it's hard trying to comfort someone when there ARE no words that will actually bring comfort.

    But it's one of those many things that just drove me to tears when I was the patient...it was so frustrating!!! Alicia was talking about it the other day and brought it right back.
     
  25. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    I can't remember if anyone mentioned this, but. I can't have anything or touch anything that is cold for five days after my treatment. I can't even go in the fridge or freezer. It was also recommended that I let someone warm the car before I get in. If possible, someone should also pump my gas. If I think of anything else, I will share.
     
  26. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    DHE, I've never heard of any of that. Is it a question of comfort, is is there something medical behind it?
     
  27. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Alice, it comes from information from the dr. I will post the exact wording when I get to my house computer & not my cell.
     
  28. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 9, 2010

    Thanks so much.
     
  29. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Dec 14, 2010

    Alice here is the information that I said I would share. This information is coming directly from resources that I was given from the oncologist.


    Self-care tips to reduce the side effects caused by cold temperature for the first five days after oxalipatin (name of drug) treatment.

    ~Avoind going outside in cold weather if possible: when it is absolutely necessar, wear warm mittens (rather than gloves) socks, scarf, & footwear.
    ~Have someone else warm up the car ahead of time, especially when you are getting in the car from home or after treatment.
    ~Try not to breathe deeply when exposed to cold air, such as winter cold or from an open refrigerator or freezer.
    ~Wear gloves when opening and reaching into a refrigerator or freezer-like frozen section of food store.
    ~Be aware that most metals are cold to touch especially in the winter. These include your car door and mailbox. Wear gloves to touch cold objects. Have someone else pump the gas for your car during winter.
    ~Avoid drinkikng cold beverages and eating ice cream or other frozen desserts. If you drink a cold beverage by mistake, the drink a warm beverage right away.
    ~Use a straw when drinking fluids. Avoid very hot and very cold fluids.
    ~Do not suck ice chips during treatment.
    ~In hot weather, do not run an air conditioner at a high level in the house or car.
    ~If your body gets cold, warm the affected part. If your hands get cold, wash them with warm water.
     
  30. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Dec 14, 2010

    Oh Alice. My prayers for your friend.

    Not first hand experience, but 2nd hand from taking my dad to his treatments and taking care of him.

    Depending on the type of treatment the symptoms could be anywhere on a huge range. Dad didn't lose his hair, but did experience neuropathy severly for about 2 years. He still runs a little colder than the rest of us, but his feeling in his hands and feet has come back. He was also sick for about a week after treatment, so we left a bathroom for his use only. The first day after treatment he had to go to the bathroom a lot, and wanted to sleep. It took about 2 days for him to even think about eating anything.

    He also had a hard time consentrating on anything. It was very frustrating for him, especially when he was working. He had to take short breaks and refocus himself. I bought him a few books that were super short stories, but he still couldn't concentrate. At the treatment center they had personal DVD players for the patients. He could sit and watch a movie, because he could pause it any time he got up to go to the bathroom. It was able to keep his attention most of the time. And if he didn't remember it, he could watch it again. We watched a lot of movies during that time.
     

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