Hard Lockdows

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Caesar753, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    As a teacher, I know that hard lockdown drills are important to do. Kids are better at doing what they need to do when they have a chance to practice.

    As a parent of a preschooler, I hate these drills. My kid's school had one today and my kid was terrified, like sobbing and scared, even after it was over. When the nanny arrived at pick-up, my kid was still crying and basically ran to the nanny's car asking (crying) if something bad was going to happen while they were outside. Hearing this makes my heart break. :(

    I'm not really asking a question or anything. Just sharing, I suppose.
     
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  3. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Do they explain to the kids that it is just a drill, and the purpose of the drill? I would think that to be important.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I'm sure that they do. The teachers in my kid's program are excellent. But my kid is 3.
     
  5. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    I work with 3- to 5-year-olds and we always explain it to them in a way they can understand. It's nothing new in the area we live in though. We have real lockdowns instead of drills. One day last year, we had a hard lockdown that lasted over an hour. We were stuffed/locked in the bathroom of our classroom. We have soft lockdowns more than hard lockdowns so the kids don't even notice most of the time. It's a sad world we live in. When I was a kid, we only had tornado drills & fire drills . Now we have tornado, fire, earthquake, soft lockdown, & hard lockdown.
     
  6. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

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    I work with highschool students and hate these as well. Many students are made VERY upset. They understand on one level that it is a drill, but...really? Do we really need these? Sigh. I hate these drills. I try to use them as a reminder of how our classroom is a safe place and the school thinks of all sorts of ways to keep them safe. But really - kinder and pre k do these drills? Oh man, I'm so sorry. That just seems far too scary for little ones.
     
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  7. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I for one find these drills rediculous but we still have to do it.

    In reality, no one will ever walk through a school on a weekday and see lights out and doors locked and think "i guess there was no school today". Especially if it's a student who practices the same drills.

    It's about slowing them down I guess, but again in reality, police wouldn't go in right away anyway, so who are we really kidding?
     
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  8. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

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    Oh, and we have had real lockdowns I guess the soft kind? Just stay in room until we aer told it's all clear and one time we had to evacuate due to crime in building. But the drills are FAR more scary. Go figure.
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sorry your little one was scared today. Hopefully hugs and kisses at home helped.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Our district differentiates between hard and soft lockdowns. During soft lockdowns, it's business as usual except that students can't leave the room. These lockdowns are for situations where the students will be safe inside their classrooms, like if there's a swarm of bees or pack of wild coyotes on campus or if EMTs need to get a gurney through clear hallways in order to get to a person who is having a medical emergency. During hard lockdowns, we lock the doors and hide. These are for more critical situations where there may be an intruder on campus.

    My school had an actual hard lockdown that turned into a soft lockdown a couple of years ago. It started at about 1 PM and lasted until after 8 PM. My kid would probably have a straight up panic attack if that were to happen again. Poor kid. :(
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    We call soft drills "shelter in place" and we also practice hard lockdowns as well as evacuation drills and fire drills. Ugh...
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I sure hope they did. Kid told me that there was an "emergency call" at school, no mention of tears or being scared. I don't want this to be something that seems like no big deal but pops up later as some huge trigger or something, you know? Either way, I'm not going to make a big deal of it or talk about it unless it gets brought up again.
     
  13. Sab

    Sab Companion

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    One of the schools I student taught at decided to get rid of lockdown drills because A) they're stressful for the kids) and B) they're just unnecessary and unrealistic. Someone came in to train us on what to if there were actually an active shooter and they basically told us in almost no circumstance would you want to stay in the classroom. Even if the gunshots were very nearby you'd be much better off running. I feel like that's the way to go.
     
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  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I don't disagree with you, but we still have to do what admin tells us, at least during the drills. Until admin, or really the district, changes the procedure, we're stuck with the drills.
     
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  15. Sab

    Sab Companion

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    True, it's unfortunate.
     
  16. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    I'm not saying I totally disagree with hard lockdown drills; the purpose of a drill is to condition students to behave a certain way. I do agree with AlwaysAttend, though, an intruder will be aware that everyone's hiding. (Due to security, I can't reveal my school's procedures). I think we need to continually rethink our procedures and plans, use creative thinking, and prepare for the unpreparable.

    I agree with Caesar, this is very frightening to children and overly traumatic. I remember becoming frightened as a child during 1960's TV commercials about how to proceed to a fallout shelter, and I recall talking with my mom after each commercial. Every time a "special report" interrupted my cartoons, I recall becoming tense, wondering if it was a report about the need to go to the nearest shelter--(I knew where it was by the way. It was in the basement of the local post office). I think we need to explain the situation to children on a need to know basis, enough information to which they'll be safe but usually we don't have to give all the shocking details, either--the same way we explain other mature information. After such a drill or talk, the most important procedure is to can the rest of the lessons if necessary and listen. The kids will need an opportunity to talk and ask questions. Not every question needs specifically answered, same as any questions that are asked that are too mature to answer in a classroom situation. But they need an opportunity to vent. They also need an opportunity for play, a child's natural venting process; much therapy occurs while climbing or swinging on swings. OK, it's going to wreck that day's lessons, but to not concern ourselves with the child's feelings, frustrations and fears is to make the drill itself null and void. Unresolved trauma will rest in the brain, and then during a real lockdown, the upper brain will be less likely to override the lower brain's reaction. In other words, those children will be most likely to panic.
     
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  17. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    We have all sorts of drills--fire, tornado, earthquake, evacuation due to threats, lockdown. We also have shelter-in-place drills where we have to turn off the ventilation system and seal ourselves in the building. We are downwind of a government nerve gas storage facility.
     
  18. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Can i say that i would love watching a drill wHere kids had to duct tape all the areas air could enter the room. That sounds like a fun drill lol. I assume they don't go that far.
     
  19. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I always tell my kids we're playing a schoolwide game of hide and seek. My third graders always appreciated having something else to think about, and my fifth graders see lockdown drills as the pointless exercises they are.
     
  20. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Woah! Wait a minute. Did I read this correctly? Nerve gas storage???? No, I'm not doubting your word, but I am doubting the logic in storing up something as horrific as nerve gas. I'm assuming you teach in the U.S. I thought such weapons were considered illegal by the U.S. Wow! This post is really giving me the willies. At the same time, it's causing me to consider realistically the many, many tragedies we need to be prepared for and attempt to avoid. I'm also thinking of the unthinkable conditions many are trying to survive in, currently in other countries. I've read several books recounting such experiences.

    This just reinforces in my mind the utter importance of our mission. The more students learn, the more likely they will grow into respectable adults. The more students read, the more they will understand other's feelings, actual factual information, and logical thinking. The more proficiently students understand mathematics, the more likely they will be to correctly interpret data.

    No, education isn't perfect. Knowledge might be power, and power can always be misused. But people also "die for lack of knowledge." It's often the student who is allowed to struggle in school who falls prey to dope dealers, which is why in my area we have to tell children not to pick up discarded hypodermic needles. It's why my friend's drug store was held up at gunpoint last year and my other friend came home to find his house robbed. Furthermore, It's the people who can't think critically who believe the many forms of propaganda prevalent in today's world. It's the people who don't think mathematically who are persuaded by exaggerated statistics.

    I'm ranting on and on, I realize that, but the point I'm trying to make is this. More important than lockdown drills is unlocking education to all, trying our best to ensure that students learn to the best of their ability. An educated society is a thinking society. And that is why TEACHERS are the most important resource we have against crime and war.
     
  21. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I looked online and saw we've eliminated about 90% of our chemical weapons and are on pace to finish by 2023.
     
  22. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    It's a serious drill. Not fun at all. We are contained to one area of the building, the gym. Yes, we really do seal ourselves in. The adults do it, not the kids. And we are also monitored by official teams who analyze our plan. All houses downwind also have free alert radios and shelter in place kits in their homes.
     
  23. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    If there was an actual emergency, how long would you have to travel to the gym before the nerve agent reached you? If you sealed off the air in the gym and filled it with hundreds of people, have they calculated how long you could be in there before everyone suffocates?
     
  24. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Well, . . . you know that when nerve gas weapons were put out of commission, they didn't just disappear. They had to do something with them. Check out this link.

    https://publicintelligence.net/us-chem-weapons/

    I'm just a few miles from the Bluegrass facility. My DH drives by it twice a day. We go by it anytime we have to go to the grocery. His school is closer than mine, but he is upwind and doesn't have as strict of a plan. We have 20-30 minutes of prep time, and it's 10 minute containment time before dissipation. They have leaks fairly often, but they are contained within the bunkers. The disposal facility is still being built.
     
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  25. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Caesar,

    I think this is part of a larger problem with schools that needs to be addressed. As we know as educators and parents, the way a 3 year old sees the world and an 11 year old 5th grader is so different. Our schools and districts preach us to apply diversity and differentiation, then they ignore what they preach by mandating policies which are the same for 3 year olds and 11 year olds.

    Pre-schools should have a separate way to handle lock downs that deal with their sensitive nature and age. I would have them separate and not call them lock downs. I do believe strongly that if preschool teachers were given a say, they could come up with a safe and sensitive way to do lock downs. Too often it is administrators though that dictate a "one size fits all" approach. Until a more "preschool" friendly lock down is put into place, I agree that lock downs for preschoolers might be doing more harm than good.
     
  26. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    If your kid was this upset, I'm thinking they're going about the drills all wrong, maybe making them too intense. The teacher should not instill fear or try to stress the kids out, but keep them calm.

    Myself, because of the noise, I see kids being frightened by fire drills, but not lock down drills.
     
  27. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Daycares do lockdown drills now so it starts with infants. Teachers put 3 babies in designated cribs (they have signs and wheels unlike other cribs) and lock themselves in the bathrooms. I don't remember what the toddlers do. But each age group has a procedure.
    I currently teach preschoolers in a public school that goes up to 6th grade. Whatever they do, we have to do as well.
    Soft lockdowns are "business as usual" except doors are locked and nobody can leave their classrooms.
    Hard lockdowns are locked doors, lights off, blinds closed, everyone hide in the bathroom & closet and be quiet.
    Like I said in a previous post, in the area I work in now, we have enough real lockdowns that we don't even do drills.. the kids are used to it. Teachers say "again?!" But better safe than sorry.
     
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  28. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I am reasonably certain the my kid's teachers are not trying to stress the kids out.
     
  29. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Yes, but what about the other kids? Ever seen them work each other up with violent fantasies? I have.

    Again, I've never seen a kid upset to such a degree by a lock down drill. But maybe my school is simply the exception.

    Hope the little guy has bounced back.
     
  30. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    This is all scary, just plain scary. I'm much older than 3-years-old, and I'm becoming frightened just reading these posts.
     
  31. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I think it is helpful to remember that one of the safest places for elementary aged children is at school. The number of children seriously hurt or killed at an elementary school are far less than other places such as in an automobile or truck accident. Lockdown and fire drill practices may help our students be a bit safer at schools, but even without them elementary schools are still much safer than most places.
     
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  32. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    In your PP you didn't mention the other kids getting each other worked up. You said that the teachers "should not try to stress the kids out".

    And also, it's not awesome to imply that my kid is abnormal and/or that the school is some sort of monstrous place where the goal is to freak kids out as much as possible.

    This was a new experience for my kid. I'm sure it was scary to hear the announcement over the PA system. I'm sure it was strange and scary to be herded under the tables with the lights off. Fear seems like a not-unreasonable reaction to those events, especially given the age and experience of the kids involved. I just feel sad that my kid was scared. That's all.
     
  33. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    My friend, I was implying no such thing, or nothing more than the idea that your son was young and could be be upset in a manner I'm accustomed in witnessing in thousands of other young kids.

    Not everyone her is looking for a fight or trying to hurt someone. I am simply not built that way.

    Please do not take offense where none was ever intended. I am a friend, and of that you can be certain.
     
  34. otterpop

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    I have. What is your lockdown procedure? If kids are being told to get into a small area, blinds are shut, lights are off, and they absolutely cannot make a sound, that's enough to frighten a lot of kids. Whether they know why they're doing it or not, the change in routine and the seriousness of it can be scary.
     
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  35. beckyeduk8er

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