Hard for experienced teachers to get hired?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by frtrd, May 31, 2013.

  1. frtrd

    frtrd Rookie

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    I know that there is a tight job market right now, and that it's hard for almost anyone to get hired. I've especially heard that it's hard for experienced teachers to be hired because they're expensive to hire.


    But the shortage can't last forever, right? (Right???) When things bounce back again, do you all think it will still be hard for experienced teachers to be hired? Was it hard for experienced teachers to be hired in the "good old days"?


    (I ask this not because I'm an experienced teacher myself. I'm just curious about my future prospects. Also, I hope this is the right forum. I'm not currently a job seeker or else I would have posted it in the Job Seekers forum.)
     
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  3. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    In an economy where experience is seen as a detriment because of the figures on the budget, you'll likely see the inexperienced teachers getting hired over the teachers with 10 years of experience, depending on the location.
     
  4. frtrd

    frtrd Rookie

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    Yeah, I know that in the current economy it is rough. But I am curious about what it is like when the economy is good. I'm curious whether getting hired has ALWAYS been a problem for experienced teachers.
     
  5. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    There's not a teaching shortage. There's a tight job market.
     
  7. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

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    In my district, pay the same amount out of their budgets to central office no matter how much experience the teacher has. The principals hire, but our salaries come from the central office, so there is no real monetary incentive for principals to pass up experienced teachers in favor of inexperienced teachers. Smaller districts are probably different, though.
     
  8. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I started teaching 8 years ago and back then it was thought that if you have over five years it would be harder for you to move to another district. Not exactly the good old days, but it is the best I can do!
     
  9. engineerkyle

    engineerkyle Companion

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    I know what the poster meant, they meant a "glut of teachers", or a shortage of POSITIONS.
     
  10. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    My wife has 8 years experience, and while it's certainly not true that every application she has sent has resulted in an interview, she's had quite a lot of interest.

    Speaking as a former hiring manager outside the educational field, you'd usually prefer someone with at least a few years experience. Yes they cost more, but require a lot less hand-holding.

    In teaching, there is probably less increase in "productivity" during the first few years of work than in another profession, but also much less difference in salary.

    And as noted, individual schools are usually budgeted based on number of FTE's, not compensation.
     
  11. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    So will you usually get higher pay than someone with no experience going into a new school district?
     
  12. frtrd

    frtrd Rookie

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    Whoops that's what I meant to say -- edited!
     
  13. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I was told that schools wouldn't hire teachers with a Master's degree if they could get one with just a bachelor's. Everyone in my cohort got hired. My district celebrates National Boards even though it costs them more to pay teachers that have earned it.

    I think this is one of those rumors that picks up speed due to fear. IME, most districts want the best teachers they can get. And that typically costs more than hiring a 22 year old fresh out of college.
     
  14. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    Most districts will give you credit for prior experience.

    Many have a maximum step at which you can start, and I have seen posts about some that will not start even experienced teachers above step 1. They also will generally limit it to paid teaching experience after you received your certification (which seems reasonable).

    There are also some districts that will start you above your "earned step" if they really want you or need you.

    Not that much about public education is sane, but it would be kind of insane to take a teacher with 15 years experience and say "Oh, you get paid the same as someone whose ink on their diploma isn't even dry." Although as indicated above, some schools are doing it now.

    Also, some schools have expanded the meaning of "step" as part of salary freezes, so sometimes step 1 can be something like 0-3 years experience.
     
  15. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I got hired by a new district with nineteen years experience. I was the most experienced teacher interviewed for the position.

    I can see experience being a detriment in some districts though.
     
  16. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Some systems will even pay you for related work you have done outside of teaching. So a brand new teacher with an advanced degree can start out making more than an experience teacher of 20 years. When I got hired my district gave me credit for a partial year that I worked elsewhere. At their suggestion, not mine!
     
  17. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Where I am looking, they want the experience, but they don't want to pay for it. They often tell you in either the job posting or when scheduling the interview that you will start at step 1.
     
  18. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    In my area experience really can stop you from getting a job. A neighboring district can't hire anyone with over 2 years experience.

    I have sat in on many teacher interviews. My principal would comment that she was told not to hire anyone with over 5 years experience. Granted, these are elementary positions, so there are many teachers to choose from. We did interview a couple of teachers that had over the five years experience. I think she would have tried to fight to hire someone with over five years if they were really good (no one was worth fighting for). We also did not interview anyone with no experience unless they were already working in the building as aides. She did hire a few with masters degrees, but they only had a couple of years experience, so they would still get less pay than someone with five years and a bachelors.

    Of course this doesn't apply if it's a field that's hard to come by (physics, calculus, music, etc). The one teacher we hired with over five years was the choir teacher.
     
  19. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    I would tend to agree with you... unless that 22 year old is pretty. That tends to trump much of all else.
     

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