Handwriting Help

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by SaraFirst, Oct 1, 2007.

  1. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

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    Oct 1, 2007

    I have a student who has difficulty with handwriting. His mother works with him at home and he has improved. One suggestion I am going to give her is to write words with a high lighter and have him trace over them. Does anyone have any other suggestions to help him?
     
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  3. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

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    Oct 1, 2007

    Does he have trouble holding the pencil? They have many types of grippers you can buy to help with the gripping of the pencil.

    Our intervention teacher highlights the whole bottom row on each set of lines. (From the middle dotted line to the ground line.) She highlights the whole bottom section and leaves the top section blank. She said that it helps a lot of kids. I haven't tried it but she is a smartie, so it probably helps a lot of kids.
     
  4. yclark

    yclark Comrade

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    Oct 1, 2007

    I had a child last year who had real problems. Her mother got a curriculum that she used at home, thank goodness, she was willing to help. It was called Handwriting without Tears. It had some specially lined paper that had a line only for writing and midway for small letters but no top line so that the student didn't get overwhelmed and confused by all the lines.

    I really liked it. She did sooooo much better after she got used to that.
     
  5. Emma35

    Emma35 Connoisseur

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    Oct 1, 2007

    Interesting yclark. How does a student then learn to not make really tall letters if there is no top line? Just curious.
     
  6. luvteaching25

    luvteaching25 Rookie

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    There is this custom handwriting worksheet maker online. You would have to google it, but it works wonders!!!
     
  7. yclark

    yclark Comrade

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    I didn't teach the curriculum so I'm not sure how it's presented. My understanding was that the little girl in my class who was using it just learned to keep little letters within those parameters, then the capital and tall letters came next and seemed more balanced as did the letters below the line. Like I said, I don't know how it was presented but it made a huge difference.
     
  8. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

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    Oct 2, 2007

    I just talked to the student's mom and she mentioned how he holds his pencil kind of funny and that she does too. I have heard of handwriting without tears, but I don't know much about it. The highlighting sounds like it might work, but it would take awhile. I might give it a try. Thanks for the ideas!
     
  9. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Oct 3, 2007

    You can help first graders with handwriting by providing lots of opportunity to improve their small motor skills doing things other than handwriting. Working with clay, Legos, pattern blocks, using a marker and doing dot-to-dot, all kinds of things! Anything that gets them using their little fingers doing little things will help their handwriting. Then be patient and keep them practicing. Some of them just aren't physically ready to produce great handwriting. We have to keep working with them, but try some other things that they will LOVE doing that will also strengthen their small muscles.
     
  10. Carebear05

    Carebear05 Comrade

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    I have a student who's handwriting is pretty bad too. She just tends to make her letters as big as possible without paying attention to the lines. I have started to color code the lines. I use green for the top line, yellow for the middle, and red for the bottom because that's where she needs to stop! In her journal I have also started making boxes for her to write her words in so she doesn't take up the whole page.
     
  11. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Beyond that, sometimes you also have to hold them accountable. Make them redo it. Stand by and see how they are doing it so you can offer constructive criticism and show them how to do it (or guide them). Then go back and check while they are doing it. Some kids struggle with it so they get sloppier than they can normally do because it is easier. If spacing the words is a problem, give the child a word spacer. Show them the touch points. Teach the sky (top line) birds (middle line) and the ground (bottom line). Remind them frequently (touch, touch).
     
  12. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Oct 7, 2007

    I've seen handwriting paper that has slightly raised lines that supposedly help give children a tactile reminder that they need to stop their pencils when they get to the top or bottom lines. It's expensive, but maybe if it's just a sheet here and there, a pad would last a long time.

    http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=51569276

    I, too, have a student who writes SO sloppy! It affects both her handwriting and her coloring, but I don't think she can help it.
     
  13. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

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    Someone just mentioned the raised lined paper to me the other day. Has anyone used it?
     
  14. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I haven't used the raised paper but I would think that if they have trouble with motor skills to begin with then feeling the line and trying to match it to that line might be an extra step that's not really worth it especially since I don't think the line is raised enough. My opinion isn't based on experience though.
     
  15. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Oct 8, 2007

    Agree. I have them concentrate on hitting the lines. I know they are not going to make a perfect B for instance but I look to see that they hit the lines the are supposed to hit. If they are hitting the lines, then the letters usually look pretty good.
     

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