handling extreme behavior

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by TeacherBug08, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. TeacherBug08

    TeacherBug08 Companion

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    Dec 3, 2013

    How do you handle extreme behavior? I was told to give consequence and ignore. That way I am teaching to those who want to learn. When I ignore then their behavior gets worse because they want my attention. What are your thoughts. I usually call parent when this happens. I could really use some strategies or advice. I just have 3 students out of 23 that display this behavior. They are on individual management plans but im letting the rest of the class suffer because im dealing with them.
     
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  3. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Dec 4, 2013

    I would continued to ignore but keep experimenting to find a consequence that might defer the child from doing this.
     
  4. smithereyenes

    smithereyenes Rookie

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    Dec 5, 2013

    I know you said that you call parents but do you call them immediately or do you have to wait for planning or the end of the day? I have been literally stopping instruction immediately to call and have found it to be helpful. The negative attention they get from the entire class hearing your end of the conversation and then having to get on the phone and face their parent is quite a consequence. It is not the kind of attention they want from you or their classmates and it is embarrassing. Also, it sends a message to the others that they WILL be next in line for a phone call if they don't get their act together.

    It does cost instructional time in the beginning but hopefully it will pay off.

    What behaviors specifically are you seeing?
     
  5. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

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    Dec 8, 2013

    We have come to the end of the school year and I am so glad to see the back of one of these challenging students. I feel awful about this, but I have done my time with him and I have done my best. I kept mum informed (not much help there), I tried many strategies and the last thing I tried was a visual behaviour management plan. I wore a badge with his name on and when he did something bad/wrong I drew a sad face. He then had to stay on task, keep his hands/feet to himself to change the sad face to a happy face. At the end of the day I photocopied the card to send home to mum (I wrote a few words to remind me why he got a happy/sad face). We were in for a bad day if he started off with a sad face, a slightly better day if he got a smiley face first. He was actually an attention seeker and wanted me to wear the badge so everyone could see.

    He was intentionally disrupting the class, teaching and learning so much, that one Monday I told him I was not going to wear the badge anymore and I would not tolerate his behaviour either, if he mucked up he was out (we only had 5 weeks of school left). I sent him to various classes to sit out (sometimes with work and sometimes without). My reasoning was "why should 28 other children miss out on learning because ONE student wants so much attention (not just from me but from his classmates). With no attention on him, he sat quietly in the other classes, he was subdued when I brought him back to class and generally behaved better. I followed through every time.
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Dec 8, 2013

    Consequence and ignore won't be enough as the child still wants attention. Clear and specific praise for the child's correct behavior works to take care of the student's desire for attention.
     
  7. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Dec 8, 2013

    There are a ton of reasons why a child could be exhibiting extreme behavior. Finding out the reason(s) why behaviors are occurring is the first step.
     
  8. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Dec 8, 2013

    I am dealing with a similar situation this year. I have two students with some pretty signifigant medical diagnoses that cause a wide variety of behaviors. It's a challenge riding that line with them. Honestly, some days it takes more than I have and once they leave me at the end of the day for specials I just sit there with my head on the table wondering if I have another day in me. Some of their behavior is intentional, most comes from their medical issues. I'm working closely with our instructional coach and principal to find a balance with them. Three years ago I had a girl who behaved horribly in my rooml. Ignorning worked wiht her. I told her that I always spoke to her and treated her with respect and until she could do the same with me, I wouldn't respond. It was a rough few weeks, but she got the message and things coasted more or less easily. She didn't have the issues that these do have, and they feed off each other. I have 4 or 5 other boys (23 kids - 8 girls) who also feed off them. Normally their behavior wouldn't be as bad, but these two cause them to escelate (for attention, I'm sure). I say in close contact with both of their mom's (both are single parents), document EVERYTHING for their doctors, and take it a day at a time. When we have a good day we celebrate. When we have a bad one, we just try to isolate the behavior and move on. Consequences don't affect these two very much, and we are limited in what consequences we can use because of their diagnoses. I don't guess I really offered much in the way of advice, but just know there are others out here feeling your pain and offering you understanding!
     

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