Handing in work

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by katerina03, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. katerina03

    katerina03 Devotee

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    Hi all. Is there a quick-oragnized way for middle schoolers to pass in their papers? As a last year was my first year teaching and I have tried several ways to get the work collected such as: passing to the front, the side or having the helper walk around and get it. Is there a more organized way?
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    What about having a basket located in a high-traffic area, like by the door? Students could turn work in as they are entering and exiting class.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I have a basket on the corner of my desk. It works well for me because I don't have to spend class time collecting papers. It also helps the kids become more responsible about turning in their work because I'm probably not going to remind them other than the notice on the board.
     
  5. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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  6. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    There is a book by a guy (and I'm gonna have to look this up) who recommends assigning every kid a number. Then what you do is get like 32 folders and cut about 3 inches off the width. Then you staple them all together. You lay this "train" of folders down on a table and everyday have the kids go turn their stuff into their numbered folder.

    Now all the papers are sticking out a bit. You can quickly tell who didn't turn in their work. And when you collect them, gently push the papers from left to right....they stay in order (which means you can enter their grades in alphabetical order) and in one stack.

    I'll look it up and see who this guy is. I don't know if other teachers out there know who I'm referring to.
     
  7. MissMcCollum

    MissMcCollum Companion

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    I think you're talking about Rick Morris. He wrote "Tools & Toys, Fifty Fun Ways to Love Your Class" and other "new management" books. He is huge on numbering for a wide variety of reasons, and he has some other awesome ideas to keep yourself and your kids more organized.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    That seems very confusing!
     
  9. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    McCollum, BINGO!!! Rick Morris. That's who it is.

    Cassie, i'll try to find a link to explain it....Let me try again...you get like 32 of those regular filing folders. When you are looking at them horizontally so the tab sticks up....you cut about 3 inches off the edge on each folder. Then you layer the folders one on top of the other, but you space them out so you can read every tab. So if you look at the stack...it's stretched out , like an accordian, it'll take up about 3 feet.
    When you staple them, you staple the back of folder #1 to the front of folder #2, then the back of #2 to front of #3 and so on. That way you can still go to a student's number, say #18, and lift it up so he can turn in his paper. But the folders are stapled together so you don't have them flying all over the classroom. It stays in one place.
     
  10. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    It would be neat to see a picture of this. But I get what you're saying. That sounds like a neat idea, except I"m wondering where this long thing is going to be stored when it's not in use.
     
  11. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    My master teacher had a table in the back of the room that she had it laid down on the whole year. She actually divided it up into 2 - 16 folder sections. So 1 -16 was at one table, and 17 -32 was at a different location. That way you didnt have the entire class herding up to one table all at once.
     
  12. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    My team has everyone turn in their homework prior to homeroom. We have four pocket folders outside our doors - one for each period. It eliminates the "i lost it" routine, and it seriously cuts down on kids trying to "scribble down" homework during other classes.
     
  13. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    I have a deep wire paper tray that sits on the front table in my room. The kids are trained at the beginning of the year to turn work in ONLY to the bin. If they put it on my desk or try to hand it to me, then it is not turned in. Sometimes I have my "right hand man/woman" collect the papers for me. This is the person who is, you got it, seated to my right when I am facing the class. I can't remember to assign jobs to lots of different kids, but I do change the seating chart every month. My right hand man/woman does all the jobs that need doing.
     
  14. katerina03

    katerina03 Devotee

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    Thanks for all the ideas!
     
  15. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    My DH came home one day with a great wooden mailbox thingee. Don't you just love my technical jargon? ;) It's similar to the teacher mailboxes in our office, but much smaller, with only 8 slots. It's perfect, since I have 6 classes. I use the other two slots for absentee work and late work. Each slot is labeled with the class period. It sits on a counter in my room.
     
  16. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    I bought one of these. Labeled each slot with each subject. This solved my problem of kids saying other people took their papers.

    [​IMG]

    Since it was made of cardboard, it warped. I had my district's maintenance people make me one out of wood. Now I have enough slots for make up work, and drops.
     
  17. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    What about the plastic rolling cart with the 6 drawers? That's what I plan to do. I plan to have my team captian collect the work and then just place them into the drawer.
     
  18. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    I am private messaging a few people with what I could create on Microsoft Word to demonstrate what it looks like. Let me know if you would like a picture.
     
  19. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

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    [​IMG]

    This is what I use for turning in papers. I have them labeled for each subject and it keeps the papers separated. All I have to do is put them in order by number.
     
  20. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

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    haha...that's not me...just a pic from a website selling the charts.
     

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