Hand Raisng - what do you do?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by grade1teacher, Nov 23, 2006.

  1. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 23, 2006

    My students know that it is a rule in our classroom that they must raise their hand and wait to be called on before they speak/answer.
    But there are students who consistently call out while I am speaking or other students are speaking. I have tried telling them that I cannot call on them unless they raise their hands (that would be the natural consequence) but they get their answer out whether I call on them or not, so it hasn't made much impact.
    I have tried talking to the class about how frustrating it is whwen othert students do not get to speak, and when they cannot learn because others are calling out. (one student, after raising her hand, was about to speak, when, yet again, she was interupted by a classmate. She finally threw her hands up in the air, and frustrated, said " I hate when they DO that!!!)
    I acknjowledge when they are doing what is expected, raising their hand...

    When any another behavior gets out of control, I would normally be calling parents, but it happens so often, I don't want to call parents so often about something like this. Is this just a compulsive behavior of normal 6 year olds?

    How do you enmcourage handraising?
    What consequences qould you suggest for this bewhavior?
     
  2.  
  3. synapse

    synapse Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 23, 2006

    I think it might be difficult for 6 yr. olds to manage this consistently. Could you try another type of signal? Raise a popsicle stick? This might provide a concrete reminder. Pass around an object (so that only the student with the object is allowed to talk)? Reduce the amount of time where the whole class has to sit and listen to you or an individual student? I am not sure a consequence is in order, so much as an alternate strategy.
     
  4. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 23, 2006

    Yeah, I was wondering also if a consequence was really the way to go with this. Something more concrete, as you suggested might be a good plan.
    But , (and I'm just trying to think this all the way through before I start anything new) might it be a little cumbersome, If everytime I asked question, or planned to get a response from a few children, to have each child walk across the room to pass an object to the next speaker? Or is this just part of teaching them the skill of taking turns?
    I agree about not speaking for too long. most of my lessons are very interactive and they require student input and participatoin. But they can only work when they are willing to take turns :)
    Thank you so much for your input!
    Any ideas for the follow up question?
     
  5. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 23, 2006

    I was having this same problem too. What I did was get a roll of stickers and everytime someone raised their hand I said "Good Job! You're raising your hand, I'm so proud of you. Thank you." Then, everyone waited patiently even those students who called out answers. I placed the stickers on their shirts next to their hearts or on the top part of their shirts on either side of their shoulders. Some people walked out of the classroom with 10 stickers on their shirts. When someone called out or didn't raise their hand I took a sticker away. Then, they quickly learned that they had to raise their hand in order to say something. Try it, it'll work like a charm!
     
  6. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 24, 2006

    Thank you for your response! I'm trying to get as many ideas as I can to see what works for me.
    Question: How do you phase something like this out, eventually?
    In other words, I'm always worried that when I need to lessen the incentive, they will lose the drive for this. (I can predict which kids will say - hey, wheres my sticker!) Is this a problem for you, at all?
    Thank you again!
     
  7. h2omane

    h2omane Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Messages:
    374
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 24, 2006

    In our class of K, 1, 2, 3 combined, we have 3 magnetic letters (the kind on a common fridge door in a daycare center) that are attached to the side of their desk. If behaviours are silly, or out of control the disrupting student will be asked to remove a magnet and place it on the chalk board.

    At the end of the day students count up their 3 or less magnets and the teacher adds to their magnet collection beside their name.

    Once they get 20 magnets they can go "fishing". Where a little magnet is tied to a short fishing line and cast into a candy jar (fish bowl size) where fish with paper clips on their noses can be "caught".

    The fish have prizes on them such as:

    get out of homework coupon
    10 minutes extra recess for the class
    10 minute student pick game for Gym
    colouring activity book
    5 candies
    fancy pencil
    book
    slurpee
    get to sit in the rolly chair
    etc.
    100 class points (when they reach 1000 class points they have a party, and every student who fishes, raises the class points by 20.)

    The class is slient whenever a student goes fishing, as the prize could be for the student or the whole class.

    Its great fun.

    I, as a student teacher have Mr. Skinner's Good Work Tokens that are 2 inch gold foil embossed discs that the kids can earn for following my 3 rules: respect other classmates work time, raise your hand to ask or answer a question, and try it first before asking for help. If they follow the 3 rules for each lesson I teach I give them one. They can cash in 3 Good Work Tokens for one bonus magnet beside their name (so they can fish sooner).

    The kids love it and I have made these tokens out of bristol board in red, blue, black, purple, sky blue, green, moss green, hot pink, hot blue, hot orange, and hot green. The kids beg me to trade colours, but I say what you get is what you get.

    Good Luck,

    Mr. Skinner :D
     
  8. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2005
    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    9

    Nov 24, 2006

    Whatever happened to the "don't reward expected behavior?" I dunno... giving stickers every time a kid did what s/he was actually supposed to do...

    and, personally, once I've given a reward I wouldn't then take it away as a consequence for another time, kwim?

    I think a different strategy to the hand-raising would be best. I think the second poster made a good suggestion with reducing the amount of time the children have to sit and listen.

    What about small group instruction, too?
     
  9. Irissa

    Irissa Cohort

    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 24, 2006

    I tell the child privately I won't recognize them unless they raise their hands. And then I do just that. If they call out I ignore it and wait for the child I called on to answer. What the kids want is recognition. If I see that student raise their hand I call on them. It reinforces the appropriate behavior.
     
  10. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 24, 2006

    This doesn't work with me. If I ignore them they keep saying my name over and over and over... Until it drives me mad. This is why I gave them a sticker each time they raised their hands. It worked like a charm. People may have different opinions on this, but hey it worked for me! I took the stickers away if they forgot to raise their hands or called out as a "currency" to achieve appropriate behavior. This is a simple reward that can be taken away. I wouldn't take away bigger prizes such as pencils or larger-awards.

    This works "similar" to classrooms with fake money as currency. You give them the money if they show appropriate behavior if they don't you take away a dollar or two. Same thing. You learn to do what works.

    I only did it once and it worked for me. I plan on doing it only when the calling out and non-hand raising gets out of hand. If children ask, "Hey where's my sticker?" on a day you don't do it, tell them that right now you are not giving out stickers but will later on. If they're all doing a great job without having to "re-inforce" the positive behavior at the end of the lesson say "Wow! Everyone did such a great job, EVERYONE gets a sticker, Thank you for raising your hands and not calling out!" This reminds them why they are getting a sticker and what behavior they did appropriately.

    It doesn't hurt to try it. It worked for me.
     
  11. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 24, 2006

    Yes, children are "supposed" to do certain behaviors, but if your students are not at the point where they can do these behaviors independently then as a teacher you have to motivate them to do them. You can't assume that every child will know that they have to raise their hands instead of calling out. If you've told them and they aren't doing this, then you have to find a way to make sure that you get the appropriate behavior from them.

    I had trouble with hand-raising, calling out answers, and calling out my name by about 7-10 children. I kept reminding them to raise their hands, I ignored them, I gave warnings out, and I gave them time out. I then thought, "I need to reward those students that are demonstrating appropriate behavior." When I did this, the students that were demonstrating non-appropriate behavior quickly followed the other students who got the stickers and ever since then they raised their hands.

    The stickers serve as currency to them. You do what works for you.

    Another thing, this is not an everyday thing. I only did it once and ever since then they exhibited positive appropriate behavior. I would do it again only if the class got out of hand as they did at the beginning.
     
  12. Poisontipped

    Poisontipped Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 26, 2006

    Thats actually a really good method. For example, in our class (when I was in primary school) the teacher had some sort of a fluffy, interesting object that the student wanted to have and so, needed to be quiet to gain the object. And when the student was allowed to talk, the teacher would pass them the object and if someone else wanted to talk, it would get passed around etc etc
     
  13. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 26, 2006

    You can give those stickers in spot lessons. You can explain that you will not give them every time and if they ask for them that automatically means they don't get it. It is to catch good behavior (following that rule) at various times and you decide. So then maybe 2 times a week (or when you see a decline in the behavior) pull it out and get going.

    I do the same with light flashing and expecting the kids to immediately look at me (deaf class). After a while almost no one does and that is our main way of getting their attention (since talking/yelling doesn't work...hehe). So I will start with 1 set of eyes, 2 sets of eyes, etc. That signals to the kids that I'm about to start playing the "light flashing practice game." Then they start excitedly getting each others attention and we play the game. At the end I tell them that "See, that's what I want EVERY time and I knew you could do it." It stays fresh for a few days. Mine doesn't come with stickers, but a game is a reward too.
     
  14. ctopher

    ctopher Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Messages:
    386
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 26, 2006

    I get so annoyed when people say that we shouldn't do something because we read or heard that it was "wrong." I agree that rewarding expected behavior isn't always a great thing, but there are times when we need to try ANYTHING and EVERYTHING to get through to some students. If the stickers worked........WONDERFUL!

    I have at least one student every year that blurts things out after I've called on someone else. I stop....look at the student that blurted and say "Why Susie (the person I did call on) you changed your voice!" We all giggle and it usually only happens once or twice. For those that can't seem to stop I ignore them and when that doesn't work I I"ve tried incentive charts and such.
     
  15. TeacherC

    TeacherC Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,715
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 26, 2006

    You could try using stickers...no, we shouldn't always reward expected behaviors, but if you do reward those who are doing it the right way, then those who are doing it the "wrong" way will get the hint...hopefully.
    I have also seen teachers write a word on the board...like FREE TIME, and then every time a rule isn't followed (you could make it calling out), a letter is erased. If there are any letters left at the end of the day, they get whatever the reward it. You could even make it a silly word that is long and make it shorter day by day or week by week until the behavior gets better.
    I hope you find something that works! Good luck! :)
     
  16. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 26, 2006

    Thank you all very much for all your suggestions! Everytime I ask for advice on this forum, I always realize all over again that different things work for different people in different classrooms and its a matter of finding out what's out there and deciding what works for you in your situation, and what you agree with...
    I think I might use a combination of a bunch of things mentioned here, and see how it goes.
    Again, thank you :)
     
  17. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 6, 2006

    One thing that I do is if a child calls out an answer, I ignore it. I then call on a student with a quiet hand and finger over mouth who will, of course, give me the correct answer. Then I praise that student, "Good job so and so! That is the correct answer!". The student who called out the answer soon learns not to call out- that it won't matter to me and they're not listened to. I'll have a student call out rarely. It does happen, but it's pretty rare. BTW, I teach kindergarten.
     
  18. musicteach

    musicteach Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 6, 2006

    I just read through the other posts quickly, but I don't think this was mentioned. To the students who call out all the time in my class, I just say, "I'm sorry, my ears can only hear (or listen to) the students who raise their hands and wait to be called on." Then I ignore until they raise their hand...as soon as they are raising their hand quietly I immediately call on them. After consistently doing this the students catch on that I'm just not going to pay attention to them & sometimes the other kids will even correct the ones who call out.

    I like the previous idea about passing an object around for speakers...I may try that too in my kinder music class.
     
  19. MistyMooola

    MistyMooola Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2006
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 7, 2006

    I teach 3rd grade, so I'm not sure if this will help. I use a clip board for discipline in my classroom. The student must get up and move their clip (clothes pin labeled with each name). Each time their clip moves up, they lose a privilege. In my case, unfortunately, recess is just about the only privilege thy have to lose. 5 minutes every time the clip goes up. We have also talked about yelling out answers, so at this point in the year, we move clips. I also use question cards. Index card with each student's name on one. I flip through as I ask questions. It keeps them alert, and keeps me from asking the same students to often.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. rpan,
  2. Iris1001,
  3. nstructor
Total: 268 (members: 5, guests: 240, robots: 23)
test