Hand raising?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by tadpole, Jul 24, 2011.

  1. tadpole

    tadpole New Member

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    Jul 24, 2011

    Do you guys require your students to raise their hands in your classroom? This will be my fourth year, and in the past, I have avoided requiring hand raising because I teach history and wanted to encourage discussion.

    What I've found, though (probably obvious to the rest of you) is that in most classes it only encourages the loudest students to drown out the rest of them and I feel it keeps some students from feeling comfortable to speak up.

    I'm still hesitant to require hand raising, because won't it make class discussions stiff and formal? Any ideas? What do you do?
     
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jul 24, 2011

    You can't have a class discussion if more than one person is talking at a time; hand raising is one way to ensure that. If you can up with a different way to ensure that all will have the ability to share their thoughts and opinions without being interrupted or talked over, that could work the same way. I have students raise hands.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 24, 2011

    I require hand raising as well. It gives everyone an opportunity to participate.

    However, I have seen teachers who work without hand raising. To eliminate the same students talking all the time, they limit their comments. Not only does this make the student really think about what is important to add to the discussion but it provides others the opportunity to participate as well.
     
  5. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Jul 24, 2011

    I'm also finding I have student who do all the talking and take away from those quieter kids. I agree that hand raising needs to happen to ensure everyone gets a chance but even with hand raising, some talk on and on forever. Mopar...how do you get them to limit their comments?
     
  6. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Jul 24, 2011

    http://www.cat.ilstu.edu/additional/tips/cdisc.php

    I just googled this and found a few helpful tips on strategies for classroom discussions. Even though it's for university students, it's really applicable to all students. I think I'll need to spend some time teaching my students how to be a part of a good classroom discussion and make sure to reinforce it as we go through the year.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 24, 2011

    Yes, my kids raise their hands if they wish to speak. I teach anywhere from 30 to 40 kids per class. I need a way of determining who will speak.

    That said, if a kid occasionally forgets, its a non-issue. And if a kid has an emergency and has to leave the room, no words are necessary; my kids all know the explanation can wait until they return.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 24, 2011

    Third graders generally don't have the self monitoring skills to know when they are either dominating a conversation (hmmm, reminds me of some grown ups i know as well:rolleyes:)or when they really have something of value to add to a discussion. I prefer hand raising, but also utilize a lot of 'turn and talk' to elicit conversation from everyone.
     
  9. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    I have a private talk with a student about how often they are talking during discussions and how this is great that they have so much to add, but I want to hear others as well. Then we choose a number of comments that they will contribute.

    I've also tried pairing up students and then only allow one student to speak (usually the quieter student). I always give time to think though so that the comments are much more focused.
     
  10. Lynn K.

    Lynn K. Habitué

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    Jul 24, 2011

    Love this idea!
     
  11. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jul 24, 2011

    It depends on the situation. During straight lectures when I'm speaking absolutely I require hand raising. When we are discussing I don't find it necessary.
     
  12. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Jul 24, 2011

    Agree. This is how I've done it in the past.
     
  13. Hitchcock fan

    Hitchcock fan Companion

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    Jul 24, 2011

    I use handraising, but I try to let students know that they have to share the floor by saying, "Okay, Jenny, then Anquan, then David." Sometimes I set the timer and tell them up front, "We have 10 minutes to share before we move on." Like Mopar, if someone hogs the floor, then I have that private talk with him/her.
     
  14. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 24, 2011

    I teach 1st grade, but even when I taught HS my kids had to raise their hand, simply so we could hear everyone, and allow everyone a chance to voice their opinions.
     
  15. AsherDasher

    AsherDasher Companion

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    Jul 24, 2011

    I know that for me personally, when I am in one of the classes that I am taking for an endorsement, I feel more comfortable raising my hand and being called on instead of just "jumping" into the conversation. For some reason I feel uncomfortable to speak out randomly. (I guess I worry I will talk at the same time as someone else, or jump in at the wrong time. I like to know it is "safe" to talk and now my turn.) Some quieter students might feel similar to this, and prefer being called on.
     
  16. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

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    Jul 24, 2011

    Depends on what I'm doing. Review work, going over class/home work, I often use name cards. I have a card for each student in the class. The cards are always shuffled. Keeps most kids engaged. They never know when they will be called on. If a student doesn't know an answer I tell them to pick a friend to help them out. When I have an overzealous student, I might call on them to pick someone or pick a name card.

    In full class discussion, I also use the "First Johnny, then Sally, then Jillian..." approach if lots of kids are eager to join in. It is hard for many kids to wait their turn - they often say they forgot when they finally get to speak. I encourage them to write a little note to themselves if they tend to forget.
     
  17. sweetlatina23

    sweetlatina23 Cohort

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    Jul 24, 2011

    For the most part my students know that they should respect when someone else is speaking. I have never had anyone be rude and interrupt someone else that is discussing or explaining. To get the conversation going, I use a beach ball. If the ball has been sent to you once already, you have to pass it to the closest person around you who hasn't gone. This helps me make sure even the quiet one's will participate. I have been given great praise for this on my evaluations.

    However, when I am not using the beach ball I have had the same student ask and answer questions. I had to ask her nicely to give someone else an opportunity. I did this one on one and she understood.
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jul 25, 2011

    I have students put a thumbs up on their knee or on the table when they're ready to share. That way it's less intrusive and I don't get the crazy hand-wavers who may intimidate others.
     

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