Habitual lying student

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Backroads, Apr 2, 2015.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Apr 2, 2015

    At what point should one seek further treatment of repeat offenders? I’ve one student (2nd grader) who lies about his work once or twice a week. His work is passed out to him, he stuffs it into his chair pocket, and busies himself with something else. The stuffing away of the blank worksheet is something I personally witness. I give consequences,he meets with me later with the insistence he did the work but “offers to do it again”. I point out the inconsistencies and he just stares at me and insists he had done it and turned it in. This work that is at his level, so I don’t believe difficulty is the problem.

    I’ve given him opportunities to “find” the work he swears he turns in. I’m keeping the parents informed. As of yet, this kid still staunchly tells everyone he did the work.

    Consequences are being given and his “repeat work” is getting done, but it’s a headache. I’m not sure whether to or even how to kick this up to the next level, whether a counselor should get involved, or what.

    What would be the signs that more intervention is needed?
     
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  3. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Apr 2, 2015

    I would say the fact that it's habitual after speaking with him and the parents requires more intervention. I would schedule a meeting with the parents, the guidance counselor (after he/she has been briefed on the situation) and the student. Discuss the issue as a team and come up with concrete ways to help this student succeed. Having the student in on the meeting lets him know that everyone is aware of his behavior and he won't be allowed to give excuses anymore.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 2, 2015

    How is he performing academically once the work is completed?
     
  5. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Quite well. He's just a bit beneath benchmark on reading (and coming along nicely, so I'm not terribly worried) and is a math whiz.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    You need to manage this situation more closely. Consider removing his chair pocket and using proximity to make sure he starts and continues to work on assignments. As you collect work, read the names of students whose work you have...act perplexed when you don't have his....
     
  7. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Apr 25, 2015

    I have several kids who forget to turn things in. It drives me nuts. I avoid the issue by collecting every student's paper at the same time. Either I do it, or a reliable student will. Not turning it in is not an option. Usually they have had plenty of time to finish - if not, they weren't using their time properly. I will grade it, give say 5/10 points, hand it back to them, and say they can finish it and turn it back in later. Sometimes they finish it, sometimes they don't, but at least we all know what happened to it.
     
  8. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Apr 25, 2015

    I have a student who will simply put his unfinished work in the finished bin and then gets out an iPad (a choice for kids who finish their work). He's done this twice now and each time I said, "Oh wow! You're finished. Can I see all of your hard work?" To which he produced an empty page. This last time I informed him that I believe this is a kind of lying and that when he lies about finishing he loses the opportunity to go on the iPads when he's done.

    Is there something (like iPads) that your student really wants to do when he's finished? Can you use this as motivation?
     

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