Guideline Infraction Notice

Discussion in 'General Education' started by BumbleB, Jul 20, 2015.

  1. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 20, 2015

    Anyone use it? It is discussed in a lot of Harry Wong's books. Basically, when a child is displaying behavior that is not appropriate, you give them this little slip (completed of course). They are then supposed to see you after class to discuss their behavior and receive a consequence from you (if warranted).

    For those who have used it (or something similar): does filling out the form take a lot of time away from teaching? And if the kid still continues to act up after giving him the slip, what do you do then?
     
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  3. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Jul 20, 2015

    I kind of like the idea. I wouldn't use it with my 2nd graders, but for older elementary and beyond I think it could be effective. Probably depends on the teacher personality, though.
     
  4. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Sounds good if you can get your kids to accept the slip - not rip it up/throw it back in your face/let it fall on the floor - AND stay after class to discuss the infraction. Also, you have to be able to enforce your consequences without help from Admin. Just like with every other behavior management plan; if you can't consistently enforce it - especially with the difficult students - it won't work and you become a joke.

    My school had us do this last year with detention slips but it didn't work because even if students accepted the slip, few of our HS would return afterschool for detention. We couldn't force students to return for the detention and there was no consequence for them ignoring the slip and blowing it off. Also, I hated having to stop and write up the slips.

    If your students are, overall, compliant and your daily behavior issues are few/rare - this could work. If not, it might become a headache.
     
  5. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    I don't like waiting that long to address a minor infraction like that. I feel those types of things should be dealt with as soon as it is appropriate.
     
  6. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Right. AND after giving it to them, snarky middle schoolers would probably act up even more just to rebel! :)

    I agree.

    I asked because it seems like a lot of people use it (or say they're using it). I mean, Harry Wong is the guru! But it just seems so unrealistic to me. I'm waiting for someone to prove me wrong!
     
  7. raynepoe

    raynepoe Companion

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    Jul 20, 2015

    After a verbal warning, my team uses a Think Time form. The students goes to a partner classroom and fills out the form (what they did, why they did it, what they will do next time instead). It gives the student and teacher a cool off period which helps to de escalate....parents have to sign it. If they student doesn't get it signed we have a consequence....
     
  8. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jul 21, 2015

    I cannot see this kind of thing ever flying for middle school and above. I teach high school and I guarantee it would be a nightmare. At my school, when kids get called out of class to see an administrator about a referral, they come back to class with their copy of the referral slip and either: Try to share it with the rest of the class like they're proud of it (which I nip in the bud with the threat of sending them right back to the office), or toss it in the trash and grumble under their breath about how much they "hate this place" and then pout for the remainder of class.
    I hate having to stop my class to deal with a disruptive or disrespectful student. I'm thinking of having a chair or desk outside of my room next year to bounce them to. I may have some sort of form/slip for THEM to fill out when they reach that desk, and then when I have the time and the rest of the class is working, I will go conference with the student. If I don't have time, he/she can sit out there for the remainder of class and then I'll assign ASD (After-School Detention) for him/her to come make up the work he/she missed while in the hall. At my school, if a student fails to show for ASD, they get ISS for the entire day the following day, and the student will make up the missed work then.
    I might work out a "bounce" system with neighboring teachers too, and the ISS room is right across the hall from me as well. We are given four "bounce passes" for ISS for the year which allow us to send kids there without the usual formality of an office referral, etc.
    Most disruptive and disrespectful behavior is attention-seeking, so I'm going to try to do exactly the opposite of that this coming year. I've had a bad habit of giving that attention in the form of repeated verbal reprimands and threats, and letting myself get frustrated in the process (which is also something troublemakers strive for), and that was because I didn't want to take the time to get out and complete a write-up slip, call the office (where no one seems to ever answer their phone when you really need them!), or anything else that completely shuts the lesson down while I have to deal with a student.
    Of course, my first line of defense is packing every day with a lot of rigorous work that doesn't really let them come up for air long enough to cause much trouble.
     
  9. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I tried something I read where the teacher calmly places a notice on a child's desk about seeing her after class. I made up some business cards to use. They said something like "See me after class - no need to call out now, we will discuss it later."

    Oh.my.word what a major fail. I tried it a few times and gave up. Kids, no matter their personalities, would yell out "What's this for?" and try to carry on a conversation. None of them continued working. And if they were being spoken to because of something another student was involved in, the other kids would get upset that "nothing was said" and whine to their parents or the office. That happened twice.
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I have used something similar with a twist that I have found very effective. If a student is continuing to be a problem, I have some templates of letters to send home to parents. I quickly insert the child's name in it, the infraction, and then I call the child over to talk to him/her. I tell the child that because of _________ that they have been doing, that I have a note written up to give to their parents. I then tell them that I will tape the note to their desk, and if they are well behaved with no problems for the rest of the day, then I will give them permission to throw away the note. In teaching 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade this works nearly every time.

    Would I use this if I taught Kindergarten or High School? Probably not, but then I wouldn't use any note idea such as you are describing with Kindergarten or High School. What grade you teach matters a lot in making these decisions.
     
  11. SummerIsTooLong

    SummerIsTooLong Rookie

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    Jul 22, 2015

    This is what I also do, but there is a "think time" area in my classroom. I have found that it works out very well in both elementary and middle grades because parents know right away what's going on in the classroom.
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I think it should be an assigned room, not another teacher's classroom. I remember how upset a classroom teacher got when a para accepted one of these students into her classroom without permission, although she had sent students out with the para, not really knowing where they would end up. An assigned room serves the same purpose, but prevents the teacher/para confrontations we have heard about on the forum. All schools should have this - it is like having your head in the sand if you think it will never be used.
     
  13. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Jul 23, 2015

    Not all schools (mine for example) have the money for an extra room and the money for additional staff to be present in such a room.

    I have no problem with teachers sending a time-out student to my room. It lets me be an authority figure in front of my own students without any of them being the target.
     
  14. SummerIsTooLong

    SummerIsTooLong Rookie

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    It would be nice if all schools could have the room. One school I was at partnered upper grades and lower grades, so that upper grade students were sent to lower grade classrooms and vice versa. What I meant by having an area in my classroom, was that I don't send my students out at my current school, sorry for the confusion there.
     
  15. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I agree. Certain students would just rip it up to tiny pieces and leave it all over the floor.

    I prefer to go the verbal warning route. I know a lot of people say "praise in public, and reprimand in private", but many times, I find that it's better flipped depending on the situation with middle schoolers.

    Often a "Hey you, cut it out. Now." called out across the room is much more effective than waiting until an appropriate time, sneaking up, and whispering to Johnny, "You're disrupting the class. If you keep doing it, I will have to see you after class."

    I mean every case is different, and you know your particular students and how each will react, so go with what works.
     
  16. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I think it diminishes the power of the teacher doing the sending though.

    It's much more effective if they take care of all problems within their own classroom.
     
  17. leeshis0019

    leeshis0019 Companion

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    Jul 23, 2015

    I use a post-it note for high school students, but only if I want the classroom quiet.

    If people are up and talking for a lesson and someone is acting out then I will try to redirect them to the lesson in a neutral manner. If that doesn't work then they sit outside the room. I don't have time to deal with them right at that moment and the other students don't either.

    You may (or may not) be amazed at how annoyed the other students get. I don't think I've ever not had my students on my side when it comes to this. It's the only part of the "community" classroom that seems to work for me. If I call someone out everyone else is bothered because now it's going to take that much longer for them to start the practice, etc.
     
  18. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    It depends on how often it is done. In many cases I agree as it implies "I can't deal with this, go to someone who can." However, if your classroom culture is such that being removed from class is truly a punishment (meaning they really don't want to leave) and is used sparingly then I see the value. I don't think it is a tool we should throw out completely but do agree to use it very sparingly.
     
  19. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jul 24, 2015

    I see it as, "I'm not allowing you to control the atmosphere in my classroom, go somewhere else while the rest of us continue to do what we're here for: learn."

    It's definitely reserved for those students who are relentless in their pursuit of disrupting the learning environment. It's not fair to the other students to keep that disruptive one in the room.
     

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