Guided Reading

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by nboris827, Jul 30, 2009.

  1. nboris827

    nboris827 Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2009

    Hi! My principal came to me yesterday and told me that there is a chance that I will be moving from 2nd grade to 4th grade this year. This isn't 100% yet (it depends on how many more 2nd grade students we get!), but just in case, I wanted to learn a little more about 4th graders. Many of the students who will be in 4th grade this year are students I had when they were in 2nd, so I'm not too worried about that.

    For Reading, my school does Guided Reading in 4th and 5th (we have Reading First for K-3). Can anyone explain this to me? I have no idea how to do Guided Reading. Any help is greatly appreciated!

    Thank you!

    ~nboris827
     
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  3. runNteach09

    runNteach09 Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2009

    I was just going to post about guided reading today, until I saw your post. Last year, we did a "rough" type of guided reading- focusing on small groups and level appropriate books. This year, I moved to a new district and they are very upfront about using guided reading in the classroom. Can someone please tell me how you structure it in your room and what works for you? Thanks!
     
  4. MsX

    MsX Companion

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    Jul 30, 2009

    I actually learned something interesting lately about guided reading - I was told (by someone who has attending Teacher's College Reading and writing Project's summer institute for reading) that guided reading is technically for students still learning to decode (like up to guided reading level K or so). Students at higher levels should be participating in strategy groups instead. The difference is that strategy groups aren't necessarily homogeneous (though they can be) and generally students use their own independent book. The groups are made based on a skill you want to student to work on. The teacher uses her own book, teaches the strategy, and the students practice in their own with their own books

    This might not work for you since it sounds like your school already has a clear program for what they'd like. But I thought I'd share since I found that interesting!

    As for how guided reading functions: the teacher groups the students based on reading ability and chooses a book that is 1 level higher than the students independent reading level. The book is introduced (give a general explanation, have students share what they already know about the topic, etc), you will point out anything particularly tricky that they might encounter, then the students each read the book independently. The teacher "listens in" (generally I tap the child on the hand and they know then to start reading aloud) to one student at a time and coaches them along. Then you wrap it up with a general discussion.

    Here's a website that's really useful. It has videos of guided reading and other aspects of reading and writer's workshop.

    http://quest.carnegiefoundation.org/~dpointer/jennifermyers/archive.htm

    Sorry my post got so long!
     
  5. kidsr#1

    kidsr#1 Companion

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    Jul 30, 2009

    This is similar to what I do, except...I have my groups read around the table out loud with me. I have a hard time with the read when I tap your hand idea. A lot of kids at a small table can't focus when someone next to them starts reading out loud even in a quiet voice. I find that by reading aloud we are practicing a variety of skills. I am able to observe their word attack skills, fluency, expression, etc.

    I have my groups read a small section with me. I will then assign them to read a part of the book, complete a response activity of some kind (writing a summary, comprehension questions, write 5 questions to ask the group about what you read, write a letter to a character...). When they meet with me again I have them share their letter, ask their questions, etc. or we grade their questions together (we can talk about how to restate the question and retelling important details). This is a good way to review the story and straighten out any confusing details.

    While my students are reading their assignments for homework, they should be writing down words that they don't understand, could not say, parts of the story that make them think of something else, etc.
    I give them part of a stack of small sticky notes to do this.
     
  6. nboris827

    nboris827 Rookie

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    Jul 31, 2009

    How long does it take to get through a book? A week? Two weeks?
     
  7. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Aug 2, 2009

    I don't guide my kids through the books. I guide them through skills using a variety of materials. Sometimes they complete graphic organizers, and other times they try to find examples of specific skills used in literature/magazines... :) Sometimes we create podcasts, also. They are guided through all skills and receive extra practice in those they struggle with the most.
     
  8. Bumble

    Bumble Groupie

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    Aug 2, 2009

    It isn't necessary to finish a book. The point is to teach/practice a skill.
     
  9. kidsr#1

    kidsr#1 Companion

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    Aug 4, 2009

    We practice a variety of skills as we read our books. We focus on comprehension also which is very big on our state testing. Depending on the length, difficulty of the book, and how often the groups meet it might take 2 weeks to finish the books. My kids love doing it this way.

    I had a multiage class for the last three years of third through fifth graders. I had several parents tell me the biggest problem their fifth graders had was that they wouldn't be able to choose their books for reading groups! It worked really well. Their reading lexiles went up a lot from the beginning of the year.
     

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