Guided Reading

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by teacherteacher, Mar 29, 2006.

  1. teacherteacher

    teacherteacher Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2006

    Hello,

    Would anyone be so kind as to share their Guided Reading plans? Specifically, I'd like to know the following:

    1. How you group your students
    2. Your plans for each group for the week
    3. The activities that you use

    Thanks,

    teacherteacher

    PS...THIS IS FOR UPPER ELEMENTARY 4/5
     
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  3. teacherteacher

    teacherteacher Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2006

    Guided Reading--Part 2

    Hello,

    I have another question.

    1. Do any of you ever use a novel (chapter book) during your Guided Reading time?

    2. What exactly are you working on during Guided Reading and how often (how long and how many days per week) do you meet with each of your groups?

    Thanks again,

    teacherteacher
     
  4. ktusten

    ktusten Rookie

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    Mar 30, 2006

    I am getting ready to student teach...

    and am also up for hearing how others do guided reading =) I just love hearing everyones ideas and creating my own "how to" guide since I really feel that I am not getting what I need in my classes
     
  5. lehcar1021

    lehcar1021 Rookie

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    Mar 30, 2006

    Planning guided reading can be quite challenging depending on how wide your range is. I have 5 guided reading groups, with no more than 6 students in each group (avg. is 4-6 students). I meet with the groups four days a week. Each day I meet with every group for about 10-15 minutes. 4/5 grade should meet at least twice a week. They are grouped based on reading level that was assessed at the beginning of the year. Keep in mind that students CAN move groups as needed, but many of my groups move up as a whole group. My levels right now are G, K, L, N, and O (scholastic guided reading). My lower levels do easier text with more pictures whereas my top 2 groups often do chapter books and novels (Boxcar Children, Flat Stanley, Cam Jansen, etc). My lower groups can get through their book in about 4-6 days whereas my higher groups may take up to 10 days to get through a book because of the length.
    During group meetings, each child should read aloud to you from the book. Because it is GUIDED reading, students should not be immediately corrected on mistakes, but asked to "check again", or "does that make sense?" or, "sound it out", "read carefully", etc. Also, this is a time to check comprehension. Ask students to predict, retell, summarize. Again, this is GUIDED reading, so if they are unsure, don't just remind them, make sure they use strategies to find out. Reread a page, look at pictures, etc.
    After a group has finished a book, I do a small project/activity with them. Some past examples include re-enacting the book through a play, dioramas, story cubes, clay creations, mobiles, etc. During the actual guided reading time, I try to do skills with each group, using the book as a guide. For example, if you notice many contractions in a book, it would be a good time to have kids find the contractions and write out their full form.
    Every once in a while, I assign guided reading homework in a group. Read one chapter, complete a comprehension question sheet, write a prediction for the next chapter, complete a character map for a chosen character, etc.
    I really could go on for quite some time here. I have done a lot of guided reading in classrooms and I majored in Reading. If you have anymore specific questions that I could help you with, I'd be MORE than happy. :)
     
  6. teacherteacher

    teacherteacher Rookie

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    Apr 1, 2006

    Lehcar,

    Thank you for your wonderful post.

    "During group meetings, each child should read aloud to you from the book. Because it is GUIDED reading, students should not be immediately corrected on mistakes, but asked to "check again", or "does that make sense?" or, "sound it out", "read carefully", etc. Also, this is a time to check comprehension. Ask students to predict, retell, summarize. Again, this is GUIDED reading, so if they are unsure, don't just remind them, make sure they use strategies to find out. Reread a page, look at pictures, etc."

    In looking at your response, I see that I'm not exactly clear on what Guided Reading is. Is this when I'm teaching strategies for them to use while reading? You also mention skills? In reference to skills, do you mean making inferences, finding the main idea, and things like that?

    I have the the Fountas and Pinnell book, Guiding Readers and Writers, but it is overwhelming. There seems to be a lot of information to take in.

    I'm very interested in what else you have to contribute to the subject, since you seem to be an expert. And expert help is what I need, so thank you. I will only have 15 minutes with each group (this is nonnegotiable) so I really need to make use of the time I have.

    Thank you,

    teacherteacher
     
  7. lehcar1021

    lehcar1021 Rookie

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    Apr 2, 2006

    Fountas and Pinnell have some great books, but yes, very overwhelming. Guided reading is really a time to listen and assess students for reading and comprehension. Guided reading texts should be at an instructional level, meaning it is not too easy and not too hard for students, but provides new and unfamiliar words that they can learn to help them grow. Therefore, children need to have strategies to figure out these words rather than having the teacher just tell them what the word says. They can sound it out, look at a picture, keep reading the sentence and put it into context, or make a substitution (if it is a proper noun that is difficult to pronounce ex: Lucy for Louise, it doesn't change the meaning).

    As far as skills, if there are a lot of contractions in the book, take a day and talk about what a contraction is and have students find them and determine what they mean. I teach 2nd grade and we do contractions, and your students may not need contraction help, but this is an example.

    While you are reading, important parts to really hit on are setting, characters, problem, and solution. Everyday we read, we talk about these things (if they have come up in the book so far). Then, as a culminating activity to a book, I have students do a project that includes this information. For example, a mobile: Take a hanger and hang 6 index cards on yarn off it. On the cards: 1) The title and author of the book. 2) Characters 3) Setting 4) Problem 5) Solution 6) Favorite Part.
     
  8. Sarah Leigh Ann

    Sarah Leigh Ann Companion

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    Apr 2, 2006

    Excellent ideas- I do a lot of the same with story elements.

    I teach two groups a day with at least six kids in each group. Some of the students in my class go to other teachers for reading group and of course I get students from other classes. I have two this time from another class. My students range from almost on grade level to above grade level. They are given a test by our reading interventionists to determine their reading level. I do not ask my students to read a text aloud before they have a chance to practice it. We often read a few pages stop discuss and then read some more. I don't have to hear the students read to know they are understanding the text. The students are given time to practice rereading the book since they are in first grade this helps build fluency. Depending on the text we usually read a new book every day. We are working on using graphic organizers to map our understanding. Our consulting teacher says we should not have the students grouped by ability level every day but should mix them up so that struggling readers have another good reading model besides you.
     

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