Guided Reading Groups

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by mrs a, Jun 15, 2014.

  1. mrs a

    mrs a Companion

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    Jun 15, 2014

    How do you make it less obvious that your lower level reading group is your lower level to the rest of the class? Does anyone do mixed level groups?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 15, 2014

    Mixed level groups are called strategy groups and can change from day to day...these groups are made up of kids who could all use the same strategy, regardless of reading level. Guided reading groups are typically based on reading level even though the needs of each student might vary.
     
  4. ScienceEd

    ScienceEd Companion

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    Jun 16, 2014

    at my son's school they pull the students out to go to different teachers and you can't really tell which teacher has which level students.

    They have a set time in day that is "reading time" and then the students change classes based on reading ability and some are pulled out by resource teachers for one on one reading.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jun 16, 2014

    Interesting that you said this- my school is going to that model next year (students will go to different teachers for guided reading) and a lot of the gen ed teachers brought up a concern that everyone would know that the "low" kids go to Mrs. whoever's room. I wondered how the kids didn't already realize who the "low" group was within the classroom. Even in my sped room, I split the kids into two reading groups and they know who the lower one is based on the activities that are going on.

    I've heard of splitting groups by skill instead of reading level, but IMO with a very few exceptions you would still end up with ability level groups just based on the skill they need. Kids that need short vowels are obviously going to the be the lowest group and kids that need advanced comprehension are obviously going to be the highest group.

    My teammate last year tried having reading groups with one low student, one middle student, and one high student at the insistence of his instructional coach. He said the middle student benefited but both the high and low student made no progress and were frustrated within the group, as the material was either too easy or too hard for them.
     
  6. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jun 16, 2014

    I have done skill groups with great success. When I do these, all the skills are comprehension skills, so everyone in the group is working on finding supporting details or inferencing, etc., they are just using different texts. I mix these with regular guided groups. Every person in the class comes to some type of reading group.
     
  7. AlexaD

    AlexaD Companion

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    Jun 16, 2014

    Interesting question. I do reading level groups and I think this benefited the kids more than mixed strategy groups would have. The lower group was much more confident together than they would have been if they were mixed in with higher level readers. The high group benefited from instruction on their level. I never heard any negative comments about why the reading groups were the way they were.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 16, 2014

    Strategy groups ARE getting the instruction they need at their level. Do what works for you, though!:)
     
  9. live

    live Companion

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    Jun 16, 2014

    I use mixed groups with success. The groups are flexible, so the students are not "stuck" in any particular group. Low and high students may still need strategies for similar skills.

    For instance: One student has low comprehension and low fluency. Another student has high comprehension and low fluency. In that case, you could put them both in a group that is working on decoding. Then the next day, they could be in separate comprehension groups, where one child is working on vocabulary strategies and the other child is in an enrichment group.
     
  10. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Jul 4, 2014

    I feel it's really impossible to mask these things. Students are smarter about this then we think. The kids see what books other students are reading, they overhear them reading, they just catch on. They know who is "high" and who is "low." Even if not ever kid catches onto this, enough will.

    What I think is more important is creating a classroom environment where all students feel comfortable with their strengths and weaknesses no matter what level they're at. In an inclusion class, this is extremely important for me, because I have students far below grade level and some far above grade level. Yet, they all accept each other, they all celebrate each other's successes and they all are comfortable to ask questions or share their thoughts during a lesson or discussion.
     
  11. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Jul 4, 2014


    This is a great post! :thumb: I feel the same way and try to create that kind of a class climate as well.
     

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