Guided Reading Blues in Grade 1

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by Doublescoop, Oct 29, 2005.

  1. Doublescoop

    Doublescoop Companion

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    Oct 29, 2005

    I absolutely love doing guided reading in small groups. I believe it does a tremendous amount of good to their reading development. The problem is what to do with the rest of the class.

    I have centres set up of course and I try to make them as simple and routine as possible (maybe just change things a bit each cycle to spice it up). I have volunteer moms and a T.A. coming in to help supervise and keep kids on track and I'm wondering what on earth I would do without these moms and the T.A because even with them there, things get a little hairy at times!!

    What do the rest of you do to ensure that a) kids are working not fooling around, b) real material is being covered at the centres, not just time-fillers and c) kids are doing good work, not just rushing through it so they can be "done"?
     
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  3. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    I've used an accountability piece to my learning stations. They have a chart in a folder that grids the learning stations for that week. Once they have completed a station, they color in the square. Then they don't repeat.

    Hmm. It's a good question. I don't have an aide or parent helper, so I am still training my students to complete tasks when they work without me. They have to show me completed work. But it doesn't address the issue of rushing or fooling around...gets me to thinking.

    I have trouble with mine fooling around and not completing tasks. I'd love to hear ideas too. :*)
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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  5. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    Oct 29, 2005

    I only have 10 students, so when I work with a group of readers, there are just a few left over. I have reading centers that are self-checkable: story sequencing or abc order practice: I write parts of a story or words on the back of the front cover of a cereal box, hamburger helper, anything (my husband gets in trouble whenever he throws away "garbage" without consulting me!) I cut them apart, and students put them together, then flip them over to the "puzzle side" to see if they are correct. These keep the students engaged and are easy to make a lot of. I also use the listening center by recording myself reading a story and after the story I give directions for a small, simple project. The listening center is always popular, and they especially love hearing me (or my husband) reading on tape! I hope to include stories on computer sometime soon, too... that would certainly keep the students' attention!
     
  6. 1stferg

    1stferg Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2005

    I change the "stuff" in the centers every week. Routines are the same with different materials.

    My kids are in 5 groups (mixed ability). So I have 5 big centers. Each center has three specific things to do. At least one of the activities in each center is open ended and they could do it all day long and not get bored. I rotate groups every day so by the end of the week they have been to all 5 centers.

    I pull my guided reading groups from the centers, usually one child from each center. That lightens the load at the centers too.
     
  7. Sarah Leigh Ann

    Sarah Leigh Ann Companion

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    Oct 30, 2005

    I don't have any help at all- I wish I did! My students love centers and know that if they are fooling around they are on vacation from centers until they earn a trip back. I have five centers: independent reading (for accountability I have reader's response notebooks or reading logs), listening/drama (they listen to the story and then retell it using puppets), writing (independent writing/ thematic writing), word works (working with spelling words), and computer (games and Internet games from my website).

    Just like with anything the students need to know they have to use whisper voices and if they do not talk quietly and do their work then they will do seat silent work. I make the seat silent work miserable by having them do crappy worksheets from our basal practice book. They hate them as much as I do.
     
  8. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2005

    1stferg,
    I'd love for you to share some specifics about the centers you use!
     
  9. 1stferg

    1stferg Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2005

    Okay Knittingbec, I am planning them now for this week.

    1. Computer=working on Compass Learning or Starfall.com. (I have 4 computers in my room networked to the school system and the internet.)
    Read Around the Room=kids use fly swatters, stored beside the printer, as pointers to read everything written on walls. They can make two or three trip around the room and the stuff hanging on the wall changes often, too. (graphs we made, the results of interactive writing, new word lists, children's work)
    Bug Patterns=I bought those plastic bugs from the Dollar Tree. Each pack had 4 kinds of bugs in 5 different colors. There's over a hundred bugs. These are stored under the printer. Kids sort them by shape or color then they make patters. Sometimes it stretches all the way across the reading rug-12feet.

    2. Pocket Chart=I am not using actual sentence strips this week. I have a poster, several years old, about animals in a tree. "____ little ___ sitting in a tree. Those little ___ are happy as can be. Along came Mr. Crocodile, he didn't make a sound. Snap! one less ____ was around." I printed cards with monkeys, cats, bears, elephants, spiders and apples, the words for these pictures in singular and plural and number words for 1-5. Covered it all with contact paper and applied magnets to the back. Kids will complete sentences with the word cards and put pictures in the tree. (the whole thing took only about 40 minutes to make)
    Listening="Zoom Broom" A carry over from Halloween. Kids never tire of celebrating a holiday. Cassette player is on a shelf beside pocket chart.
    Top-It=a game from our math series. children play in pairs. need a deck of number cards 1-15 two of each number. Shuffle, deal all cards. Each child plays one card at a time, highest card wins, (a lot like war). Child with the most cards wins. Reshuffle, play again. Game cards are on the shelf with the cassette player.

    3. Spelling=Write spelling words with bubble letters, then color. Words are listed on a white board in back of room.
    Spelling chain=write each spelling word on a paper strip. use strips to make a chain, words must be in abc order to get a sticker. Materials are on a desk under the white board.
    Addition wipe off cards=also on a desk under the white board. These came from the Dollar Tree too. Each card has an addition problem on the front and on the back. Use dry erase markers to write answer and wipe it off. Huge stack of cards. They are allowed to take 10 to their desk at a time. They can keep exchanging cards as they finish.

    4. Vocabulary=Complete cloze sentences with words. I'll probably use a worksheet from the reading series. I have a lot of independent readers this year who have no trouble filling out the worksheets. They help those who have trouble reading it. The kids love to do these sheets by themselves.
    Memory=two cards for every vocab word, shuffle and lay face down. Plays just like regular Memory except you have to read the words to be able to keep them. If you can't read them even though they match you have to turn them back over.
    Playdough=roll into long "worms" to make letters or numbers. Then make a word or a number sentence that a partner at the table has to read or solve. All of number 4 is at a long table near the windows.

    5. Book making=An Apple Tree's Year from Scholastics 25 science mini books. I am whiting out some of the words and children have to complete the sentences with the season words.
    Take-it-to-your-seat folders=made a bunch of these last summer. Activities vary from matching pictures to sounds, pictures that go together, opposites, sequencing, etc. I usually set out five folders at a time. Some have response sheets.
    Money game=need 20 pennies and 10 nickels. Roll dice, pick up that number of pennies. when you can, exchange for nickels. play till all money is gone from the center. player with the most money at the end wins. This game came from the math series. Can play several times.

    Last week all of the stations were Halloween activities.

    Sorry it's so long. I just wanted to explain it all :)
     

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