Great Training Experiences?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Bernard, Aug 8, 2009.

  1. Bernard

    Bernard Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2004
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2009

    Are there any games/activities that you have participated in through workshops, staff meetings, or inservice that you really enjoyed?

    In particular, I am looking for games/activities relating to team building/cooperation, understanding the importance of a positive & gossip-free work place, connecting with children and families, etc. (Anything related to building a strong team that is dedicated to meeting children's needs is good!)

    I would like to add some brief reflection activities to staff meetings at the small school where I work, but have been asked by another administrator to "reflect the way adult learners learn" by making this portion of the meeting "hands-on". He feels games are the best idea.

    I, on the other hand, find that most "training games" seem forced and uncomfortable, and seem to miss the point.

    Have you ever experienced any that seemed to actually "click" with participants?

    Thanks so much!
     
  2.  
  3. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,845
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2009

    Yes!

    In a recent Marilyn Burns seminar, our facilitator gave us workbooks with pages filled with what looked like hieroglyphics along with a few familiar math equation symbols scattered throughout.

    Then, she told us to solve the problems.

    Solve the problems? We can't even read the thing!

    "Guess what?" she asked us. "That is exactly what it looks like to our students, too!"

    Well, after learning what each "foreign" symbol meant, we solved the problems on several pages. We did not get a lot of help from our "teacher," the facilitator, and often her response was, "I already explained that to you several times. Try to remember what I told you." She also repeated other sayings that many of us say on a daily basis in our classrooms.

    That was worse than no help at all!

    Bottom line? We got a bird's-eye view of what it is like to be students learning something totally foreign. We got to hear exactly how unhelpful many of our comments to students are. And, we learned how students can help each other learn!

    Believe me, that experience has definitely shaped what type of teacher I want to be next year, and how much we teachers can depend upon each other.
     
  4. **Mrs.A**

    **Mrs.A** Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2009
    Messages:
    380
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2009

    You might want to look into the Responsive Classroom approach and read "Teaching Children To Care".
     
  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,376
    Likes Received:
    809

    Aug 8, 2009

    I've done that Marilyn Burns workbook assignment at an MB training. It is eye opening. I've also done a training where I gave an impossible math problem, and then, no matter what answser you came up with, I told you "No, that's wrong!" and other lines such as "This is what happens when you don't really try" etc. It can be eye opening.

    One of my favorite activiies along this line I did at a local university for an elementary ed reading skills class. I handed out the "reading books" to my soon-to-be teachers, and then gave them a worksheet of questions, and told them it was "open book!" They were so relieved...until the opened the books. (They were my set of 1st grade readers from when I taught in Japan -- so yes, they were written in Japanese. They were also written back to front, and up-to-down, moving from right-to-left.) After I kept prodding them to "buckle down!" and "really try" we discussed what it must be like to be a learning disabled student or an ESL student, when everything you were given to do looked like this.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 191 (members: 2, guests: 172, robots: 17)
test