"great interview, but not experienced enough"

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by kassrose, May 23, 2010.

  1. kassrose

    kassrose Companion

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    May 23, 2010

    Hey,

    I had an interview that I thought went fabulous. The principal called me the other day to let me know that she loved me and so did the grade level team and I interviewed really well, but they just didn't think I had enough experience for a job this hard (multi-age). I'm frustrated, because I'm not sure what I could have done differently. I can't get more experience until someone gives me a job, but apparently I can't get a job without experience. Do you think it was just a cop-out for the principal and I really just bombed the interview. Grr, frustrated.
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 23, 2010

    No, I don't think it was a copout.

    Sometimes a principal is smart enough to realize when she has a really difficult situation.

    The good news is that she liked you enough to call. The next opening in her building may be more up your alley, and you'll already have the upper hand.
     
  4. Baliboy74

    Baliboy74 Rookie

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    May 23, 2010

    couldn't they tell that you had no experience from your resume? principlas are sometimes mildly retarded
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 23, 2010

    Ouch.

    After the week I've had, I can assure you--teachers can be less than pargons of wisdom as well.
     
  6. Baliboy74

    Baliboy74 Rookie

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    seriously....don't you think this principal should have noticed the experience factor from the resume? unless he/she can't read?
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 23, 2010

    It's not remotely possible that, on paper, it was a tossup? That the interview showed the principal that the applicant wasn't the right one for the job?

    After all, she didn't keep the job herself-- she IS hiring someone. But the experience of the OP didn't match the job. I'm sorry, but it happens.

    As it is, the OP got valuable interview experience, good feedback, and made a good impression. That networking could work to her advantage when the right job becomes available.

    I would think far less of a principal who hired an unqualified applicant she liked, knowing she was setting the teacher up for failure.
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    May 23, 2010

    I agree with Alice. The principal called her in for an interview based on her application/resume. The P probably something really great in the resume, but maybe after interviewing thought that for this position (multi-age) that the lack of teaching experience wouldn't be a good fit.
     
  9. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    May 23, 2010

    Sometimes the P does not set up the interviews even. It is done at the district level in the state that I previously worked in. So, sometimes when applicants came in and had some good ideas but were not quite what the group had in mind, the P would call the personnel dept. and tell them to send another "batch". It happens. But in my old district the principal could not demand certain qualifications, though he could request some ideals that he had in mind. So, it is never as simple as looking at a resume and saying, "no," before the interview even begins. And honestly, it was extremely nice of this P to call the applicant. He could have send a form letter in the mail that basically said, "Thank you for your interest, but the position has been filled." This was extremely nice of this P. And if I were the interviewee, I would send a thank you note with a request to the principal to please keep him/her in mind for any future positions in his/her school (or any other school that he hears of a position). When I got my current position, I actually interviewed with a principal from another school, who then referred me to a school that had an opening and sent along with me her own recommendation. So, you never know who might help you along the way to finding your just right job. ALL THE BEST to the interviewee and I am sure that the principal was trying to let you know that you had done a good job, even though you were not quite what their team needed at this time. :):):):cool::cool::cool:
     
  10. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    May 23, 2010

    Sometimes "experience" is something that can't be written in a resume. Perhaps she asked the applicant a question in the interview and the response was a bit idealistic or maybe not the most practical for a real-classroom scenario.

    I remember some of the answers I gave in my interviews and I sounded so naive and impractical for some of my responses. Now that I've taught for a year (ok, I'm still a newbie, I'll admit) I know my responses would be drastically changed.
     
  11. ms.

    ms. Comrade

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    May 23, 2010

    Don't give up! :)

    I feel like this sometimes as well. However, maybe this would be a good experience to keep in mind during your next interview. I've never been a contracted teacher, however I have thousands of hours worth of teaching (related) experience. (I have: given therapeutic horsemanship lessens for children with autism, led science camps for a local children's museum, been a teaching intern one spring, was solely responsible for planning/teaching/classroom management during my student teaching, led the local summer camp program for three years that is free for students from lower-income homes, I have spend more than 700 hours in diverse classrooms tutoring and teaching mini-lessons as a volunteer, I was part of a college group that gave motivational talks to middle school students about making good choices, etc. I know that was a massive run-on sentence. Sorry!) Even if you just had to observe a classroom during a class in college, maybe try to share things you have learned from those experiences.
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 24, 2010

    Oh, and because no one else has said it:

    Any time I've EVER heard a student refer to something or someone as "retarded" he or she has felt my wrath!!! It's an incredibly poor choice of words.

    sorry for the hijack!
     
  13. EZLN1

    EZLN1 Companion

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    May 24, 2010

    oh, the ol' " no experience"answer....that's BS....yeah, I dont care what anyone says, this is a cop out. I just recently was in another thread on another forum, and people from all professions get this same response when being let down. I feel sorry for OP, but rest assured, YOU ARE NOT THE ONLY ONE who has rocked an interview, gotten great feedback, and got this cop out answer...I know I have.
    I'm not sure how we are supposed to gain this valuable experience, when no one wants to hire you because you lack it....the great job hiring paradox:mad:
     
  14. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    May 24, 2010

    Call it a cop out if you will but this "inexperience" can also be in your favor.

    Countless "experienced" teachers have trolled these same boards, unable to get a job due to the fact that they fell higher on the salary schedule than an "inexperienced" teacher.

    Complaining doesn't solve anything. I'm all for venting but let's be proactive here. You DO have experience of some sort. Play that up. Play up your inexperience as well... You might talk about some of the new technology you're interested in trying in the classroom (this requires you actually know something about this particular type of technology) Better yet, take it upon yourself to read up on things this district has been in the paper for. Did they recently have a bake sale to raise funds for Haiti? The more informed you are, the better you'll be able to counteract your lack of traditional experience.
     
  15. Baliboy74

    Baliboy74 Rookie

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    May 24, 2010

    oki admit it was a poor choice of words.....sorry :(
     
  16. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 24, 2010

    Thank you for saying this. I was going to. That word in this context is inappropriate and offensive.
     
  17. ms.

    ms. Comrade

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    I don't think it's necessarily a cop-out. I recently was competing for a job with some experienced teachers who took a few years off after having kids. New teachers are statistically more likely to quit/resign, the number one reason being lack of classroom management skills.

    However, there are a million ways to gain valid experience without being a contracted teacher.
     
  18. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    May 24, 2010

    Also think of this way. It gives you a leg up on your interview techniques. I know the experience things stinks, but have you subbed & volunteered & did different things to gain experience.

    I know when I was in school I volunteered in 3 different classrooms (while going to school) different times of the week. I was also tutoring a fam member & in the summers I was tutoring different age groups while I babysat. As soon I was able to I was subbing.
     
  19. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 24, 2010

    This is not going to make me popular.

    But the job of a principal or a superintendant is NOT to care about you getting the experience you so desperately want and need. That's the job of your college.

    Their job is to get the best person for the job. If he or she feels the job demands experience, then hiring someone without that experience would mean not doing the right thing by the students involved.

    That's not to say that every job requires experience. Some are crying out for a fresh outlook, and for all the other things that a new teacher brings to the table.

    But still, YOUR ability to find a job is NOT the principal's priority. His or her responsibility to get the right fit for the job is. If he or she feels it demands experience, then that's what he or she should be hiring.
     
  20. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    May 24, 2010

    I just finished a round of interviews. We were JUST ABOUT to hire a new teacher who seemed like a great fit for our school. She was knowledgeable, friendly, and no experience. And then, in walked Teacher 10 year. She recently relocated, she had tons of experience in an area that was highly critical in her role, and she was professional and personable. Guess who got the job. Teacher Ten Year. It was just a better fit for what we needed. Because this position was one that had so many legalities that it entailed as well as so many areas where the person needed to be able to know how to reach struggling students, we felt compelled to go with the teacher with experience and a proven track record. We all felt bad because we felt like the first year teacher would have been a good fit for the staff, but Teacher Ten Year had that something extra that made it impossible for my principal to say, no. And ultimately, it is her decision. It happens and hopefully you can understand it.:hugs:
    That in no way diminishes that this other new teacher did a great job, and her name will come up again if we have any other vacancies. That is for sure!:)
     

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