Great comparison here

Discussion in 'General Education' started by stephenpe, Apr 17, 2015.

  1. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Apr 17, 2015

    Teaching and coaching football
    Long read but Lord it hits home...... Imagine yourself as the head coach of a high school football team.
    For months, you work with your young athletes to develop their individual skills and teamwork. You believe in your players and spend considerable time getting to know and understand each child on your team. You constantly look for ways to help your players by identifying training needs and other areas in which you can help them improve.
    As the coach, you are committed to your team. You set high expectations both on and off the field and work with your unit to meet your team’s goals and expectations.
    You provide daily inspiration and motivation to your players through your positive attitude and enthusiasm for your sport. You maintain a high level of team morale by helping your players see the positives and stay focused on solutions rather than problems.
    You understand that not every player is the same. Some are better on offense and others on defense; some in skill positions and others on the line of scrimmage. You have a defined vision for your team yet hope that each player is successful in reaching his or her unique potential.
    At your school, every child is required to play football, so you coach them all—the athletic and talented ones, as well as the small, awkward, uncoordinated ones. The ones who thrive on competition and the ones who would rather find a corner of the library and read a good book.
    As a leader and role model, you are always prepared. You study your craft constantly and develop detailed plans to help your players grow and improve. At the same time, you are open to change, will listen to your players’ ideas, and are always willing to make changes to see your team succeed.
    Ultimately, it is about the players, not you.
    You are both demanding and loving; a drill sergeant and a counselor; respected and admired . . . and sometimes feared. You believe in your players and will accept nothing less than their best at all times.
    You are not a coach for personal glory or accolades. You actually prefer to stay out of the limelight. When your team does well, you credit your players. When they do poorly, you take accountability.
    You do what you do because your love kids and are intrinsically motivated by purpose to help children experience success and enjoy this journey called life.
    You are a coach. You can’t think of anything else you would rather do.
    Now imagine that your team is scheduled for only one game this year.
    While you have numerous team practices and scrimmages, the success of your entire season will rest on how your athletes perform in only ONE game.
    A game in which you, the coach, will not be allowed to watch or participate. In fact, you are not allowed to call any of the plays or provide any guidance to players during the contest. The players are completely on their own.
    After the game, you ask each of your players, “How did it go?” While they are allowed to share how they think they might have done, they are not permitted to discuss any of the specific plays that transpired during the game.
    “I hope I didn’t let you down, Coach,” says one player.
    You are not even allowed to ask about the specifics of the game. Neither are you allowed to view any portion of the game that someone may have accidentally recorded. Violation of this rule will result in the immediate removal of your coaching credentials.
    Four months after the game, and before the start of the next season, you are called to your Athletic Director’s office to review the scoring report on each of your players from that one game, which he has finally received from the out-of-state football appraisers, via the State Department of Athletics.

    read the rest here:http://www.viewfromtheedge.net/?p=5951
     
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