Great book series for an 11 y.o. boy who's reads on a 12 grade level

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Hoot Owl, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. Hoot Owl

    Hoot Owl Aficionado

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    Does any one have any suggestions for a book series a six grade boy might enjoy which isn't dystopian in nature? I'm running out of books for this boy and his parents have expressed concerns about some the books he's read. I'm at a loss right now. I think something classic???
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    12 th grade level books aren't appropriate. Have him read the classics.
     
  4. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I have the same problem this year, with three girls at a high school reading level. Definitely pull out classics. Is there any particular genre he enjoys?
     
  5. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    I absolutely agree. At some point he does not have to be taught using only books at his reading level.

    With that said, nonfiction.
    My 12 year old reads at the 10th grade level and is currently into non-fiction books about wars.
     
  6. HorseLover

    HorseLover Comrade

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    the Narnia series is great for just about any age!
     
  7. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    E. Nesbit books, Rudyard Kipling, and other authors. You also might have him read nonfiction I was a high reader and read lots of biographies and other nonfiction books at 11 or 12. Jack London's "Call of the Wild" and Steinbeck's "Cannery Row" were entertaining to me around that age.

    Take a look at this list it has a wide variety: http://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/12th-grade

    Unfortunately if it is a true 12th grade level novel it probably will not be appropriate in some way or another.
     
  8. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events!
     
  9. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I recommend things like The Hobbit or the Lord of the Rings series. Or Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I loved these books when I was 11.
     
  10. bros

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    What books are they expressing concern about/what content?

    That's pretty close to the reading level I was at around that age, so I could suggest a lot of things.

    How about the Discworld series? It's somewhere around 30-40 books.
     
  11. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Please don't give him classics unless he'll truly enjoy them. My high schoolers struggle with most classics and it kills their enjoyment of reading. Try the what should I read next website.
     
  12. kc_in_va

    kc_in_va Rookie

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    My daughter is 11 and reads on a 12th grade level (well, according to the standardized tests, anyway). She enjoyed the Rick Riordan series (Percy Jackson, Heroes of Olympus). I think they're probably written more at a middle-school level, but they still held her interest. She also liked the Madeline L'Engle books like a Wrinkle in Time.

    As for classics, maybe some of the more "accessible" classics? To Kill a Mockingbird, Huckleberry Finn, Treasure Island....
     
  13. kc_in_va

    kc_in_va Rookie

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    Sorry, I see you said "series" - so never mind my single recs.

    I think James Patterson has a YA series - my daughter liked that a lot too.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    I'll say it again. Scholastic's book wizard is a great tool.
     
  15. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    How about the Eragon series (not sure of the name) by Christopher Paolini?
     
  16. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Raymond E. Feist's Riftwar saga was the only thing I'd read in middle school and high school. I wouldn't put it at a college reading level but it is definitely well beyond most "young adult" stuff but the themes in it are very appropriate to younger readers.

    The first book, Magician, is over 900 pages which, as a smart kid, was reason enough for me to read it. Ended up loving it and devouring the rest of the series (which is roughly 400 more books now.)
     
  17. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    What concerns do they have? Some classics have bad language.
     
  18. bros

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    Midnighters series by Scott Westerfeld

    Wheel of Time Series by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson (Sanderson finished the final books after Jordan's death)
     
  19. Hoot Owl

    Hoot Owl Aficionado

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    Thank you all for the responses, they've been extrememly helpful! His mother expressed concern that he was only 11 and she didn't want him reading material that was too mature for him.
    I also wondering about authors like Tom Clancy, would it have adult content in it? I don't have time to scour over everything in advance, and I'm still amazed at some of the content in books that I read having unexpected graphic sex scenes. I just finished The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert and it had more sex in it than I was interested in.
     
  20. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    The Ender's Game novels.
     
  21. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I see no reason to push kids into adult books. I read YA all the time! Off the top of my head, in 2013, I reread The Hunger Games trilogy, read the Divergent series, The Fault in Our Stars, The Book Thief, and several more YA books I can't think of right now. I'm not necessarily recommending, but just stating that YA can be read and enjoyed even if your reading level is more advanced.
    Goodreads is a great source. Here is a list with over 9000 books on it.
     
  22. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I totally forgot- one of the favorite books I read in 2012 was for our Battle of the Books team. It was Scumble by Ingrid Law. It is the follow up to Savvy, which I enjoyed but not quite as well. They are both great books, and they are on a 6th grade level according to AR, so they are a bit more challenging than most.
     
  23. 2ndTimeAround

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    I second the hunger games trilogy and the Lord of the rings. My own child just finished the fault in our stars and said it was too mature for her 11 year old sister.
     
  24. otterpop

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    I second (and third) what others have said about the Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, and Eragon. Eragon is a "young adult" book but there were some vocabulary words in there that were new to me.

    I can think of some adult-level books that I enjoyed in middle school, but most of them are geared toward women, and now that I think of it, mostly inappropriate for someone that age.

    What kind of books does he like to read?

    There are some good classics that are meant for children (correct me if I'm wrong), like Black Beauty, Gulliver's Travels, and Treasure Island that he may like.
     
  25. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Gulliver's Travels is a satire. It may look like it's written for kids but it's definitely scathing if you research the topics he wrote about.
     
  26. otterpop

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    I didn't realize that about this one, but I was wondering this about other books like Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies (though the second one is probably too violent, anyway). Can a (or, more specifically, this) student at a very high grade level understand adult concepts and themes that are often in high level books?
     
  27. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I really don't think most can. I have an extremely bright 6th grade cousin, but I still don't see her understanding those titles. I taught Animal Farm to 8th graders once. It might be the most painful unit I've ever done! They just didn't get it and didn't really care. Even my highest kids thought the book was "dumb".

    There's been a lot of classics being taught at lower grades now and I just don't agree with it. I taught Grapes of Wrath to my AP group one year. It was the second most painful unit I've done. Common core recommends it as a 10th grade book. I just can't stop laughing at the thought of making my sophomores read it. We did do Antigone, which went over pretty well. Macbeth is usually a favorite with my seniors.
     
  28. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I agree with you 100%.

    We were taught Animal Farm in eighth grade as well. We were all clueless! At that point we had only had a year and a half of social studies/history (as there wasn't an actual social studies class or emphasis K through 6), so we just didn't have the background required.
     
  29. gr3teacher

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    I'm amazed to hear this about Animal Farm. My social studies teacher did a "summer reading club" with Animal Farm the summer before 8th grade, and I honestly thought it was a very easy book to understand. Orwell wasn't exactly subtle with the imagery.
     
  30. allenie

    allenie New Member

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    I think the call of wild is a great book! A book about dog and very moving!
     
  31. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    But how much info did you have about the Russian revolution? We're talking kids with ZERO prior knowledge and no desire to learn it. It's a tough push when there are other, much more enjoyable books out there. They also really hated having the animals as characters. Some of them couldn't get over that. I don't blame them.

    My freshman teacher almost ruined TKAM for me. I hated it. I thought it was the worst book ever written. I didn't get it and I didn't want to. Reread it when a college prof made me and I ended up liking it a lot. I try to be picky with the classics I teach. Night is a clear winner. It's my favorite and every year the kids just love it.
     
  32. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Easy if you know something about the world outside of the United States. We pretty much...didn't.
     
  33. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Yeah. In my district, we never had to learn anything about modern history. We never learned anything past WW2, even in AP classes.
     

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