Grade 3 Girl with autism - Literacy help

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by monsieurteacher, Oct 18, 2007.

  1. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,231
    Likes Received:
    66

    Oct 18, 2007

    In my job I work as a resource teacher with the grade 3-5 students, and one of my students is a girl in grade three with autism.

    I've worked with children with autism in the past, but this is the first time I've done it in a school setting, and while she seems to be fairly high functioning, hypothetical questions are beyond her... Quite often we'll work on reading comprehension that her teacher asks me to do, and the question will be something like "what would have happened if Fran hadn't picked up the chicken", and she can tell me everything that happened in the story, but if it didn't actually happen, she can't explain it... it's like pulling teeth, I don't know if there's strategies that can help, or if that is considered to be a question that isn't appropriate... I'm wondering what you guys think?
     
  2.  
  3. slickchik

    slickchik Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2007
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 19, 2007

    Maybe try giving her some prompts to help her along. It isn't a skill she has so you need to teach it to her.

    So when you ask her a question wait and see if she has an answer, if she seems stuck give her some options, or cues.....like, do you think Fran would be happy or sad? Etc.....
     
  4. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,231
    Likes Received:
    66

    Oct 19, 2007

    Ok, that's what I have been doing, I just wasn't sure how to "teach" a skill that comes naturally to most, other than giving cues, generally, any cues that I give she'll say "yes" to, no matter what.
     
  5. rogue0208

    rogue0208 Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2007
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 19, 2007

    She seems like she's having a lot of trouble with inferential comprehension (like my new word! I just had to use it on my teaching certification exam, so now I have it on my brain :p).

    Perhaps you can start with smaller tasks to help her with that type of comprehension....start with prediction. Take a picture walk of the book adn ask her what she thinks it will be about. During reading, ask her what will happen next.

    You could even "act" out the book, put her directly in it. In my experience, kids with autism have a hard time putting themselves in other's shoes, so by having her "experience it" herself, she might understand it more.
     
  6. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,231
    Likes Received:
    66

    Oct 19, 2007

    Thanks, that sounds good, I should be doing a picture walk anyway... often I feel like I need to get a lot done in the short time I have with them, so we start right into reading... the picture walk would definitely be beneficial... I'll try that with her next week.

    I like "inferential comprehension"... I knew there had to be a more pedagogical term than how I had described it :lol:
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 19, 2007

    It is pretty common for kids with autism to be quite literal. What do you mean "what WOULD have happened?" I only know "What happened!"

    You may want to step back a bit from the "what would have happened" in the stories, to an easier concept, such as, cause and effect, etc. Start out with little things like this:

    The boy's mom said not to hit the baseball in the yard because he would break a window.
    The boy hit the baseball in the yard.
    What happens next?
    (picture of broken window, picture of mom smiling and boy playing something else)

    The boy's mom said not to hit the baseball in the yard because he would break a window.
    The boy listened to his mom.
    What happens next?
    (picture of broken window, picture of mom smiling and boy playing something else)

    Obviously, you can re-create these to her ability level, I'm not sure where she is academically. But this way, she can start thinking of "the two options" or "the three options" or even "different things that could happen" when something occurs.

    Does this make sense? I worked with one of my AU students on "inferences" and this was a way we got her to understand "what COULD have happened" or "what WOULD happen..." etc.

    If you think it would be even more beneficial to stick with the stories you're discussing, you could even do the same thing with the story and give her choices. She will hopefully eventually learn to create these choices on her own.

    What would have happened if Fran picked up the chicken?

    Would she have been happy? or Would she have been sad?
    (point to pictures in the book related to this part of the story)
    --- I know nothing about Fran or her chicken but that was just an example question ---

    Hopefully that helps a little bit....
     
  8. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,231
    Likes Received:
    66

    Oct 19, 2007

    thanks teachersk, that helps a lot too... I don't choose the work that I do with her, but I can definitely adapt what you've said to the work that the teacher gives me. Obviously, we're not getting anywhere with the "inferential comprehension" questions, I feel like I'm answering them for her sometimes by trying to give her cues. I'll definitely do that though...
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. hazaratbet,
  2. SaraFirst
Total: 377 (members: 2, guests: 347, robots: 28)
test