Good multiage math curriculum

Discussion in 'Multiage' started by thechangingtabl, May 17, 2009.

  1. thechangingtabl

    thechangingtabl Companion

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    May 17, 2009

    My principal gave me an assignment to buy a non-graded math curriculum for my K-1 class. It would be taught in small groups, probably following the Daily 3 method. Small mini-lessons and checking in after 2-3 rotations. Right now, I have a mish-mash of books. Lots of hands-on manipulatives and the state standards to guide me.

    Do I need more or should I work with what I have to cover the standards?

    I have pieces of:

    2004 Everyday Math Grade 1 and K
    The Super Source Books - ETA/Cuisinaire
    2004 Harcourt Math Grade 1 and 2 student consumable books (enough for a small group - we do not write in them)
    I have another set of books but I cannot remember the name.

    My lesson plans are terrible. My principal says she wants math lesson plans like my daily 5 rotation lesson plans. For some reason, literacy comes easier to me than math.

    Help! :help:
     
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  3. Grover

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    Mar 22, 2010

    I would absolutely recommend Gattegno. Very cheap, uses Cuisenaire Rods (although called algebricks for copyright reasons now). It's algebraic in format, developmentally appropriate for k-2 students, highly spiral, and lots of fun. I've never had any math-resistance while using it, and it's very effective. I believe the current source is Educational Solutions, in New York.
     
  4. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Mar 22, 2010

    What is Gattegno and where do you shop for it? I've googled and found a few hints, but no real product.
     
  5. Grover

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  6. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Mar 22, 2010

    I STILL can't find where to buy the math worksheets. Am I blind or what?
     
  7. Grover

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    Mar 23, 2010

    Maybe not, Gattegno isn't big on worksheets. There are some little practice books that come with the most recent version I purchased, some ten years ago, but they aren't essential to the program. One of the reasons it's so cheap. Read some of the materials. My baby has other plans for me right now.
     
  8. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Mar 23, 2010

    OK, I didn't mean worksheets. I'm very, very "not big" on worksheets myself. What I'm talking about is ... I have cuisinaire rods and so on, but I don't have "Gattegno", whatever that is. What do you mean by "version I purchased"? Where can I purchase, or even read about a version of Gattegno that I might decide to purchase?
     
  9. Grover

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    Mar 24, 2010

    http://www.educationalsolutions.com/visible-a-tangible-math/textbooks?menuId=85&ms=2


    I admit this page doesn't show much about their approach, though it lists subject matter. I can see where it might not be that meaningful if you didn't already have some familiarity with the methods. Caleb Gattegno was an educator who developed not only this, but also other math methodologies and literacy systems as well. I find the literacy stuff a bit overly elaborate, but it has a pretty good reputation.
    The basics of the Gattegno rods program is using the rods as 'things in themselves' to establish concrete relationships- which fits the concrete-operational developmental stage of kindergartners and first graders very well. The rods are assigned color names rather than numerical values, and their relationships are notated in a format that is essentially algebraic, since the letters (that represent the color names) do not have fixed value, only fixed relationships between each other. For instance, white rod, the cube, is typically regarded as equal to '1' in Cuisenaire and other systems, but Gattegno ignores this in the beginning, just letting students discover the natural relationship it has with the red rod, the green, etc. 'Trains' are used to develop the basic property of addition, which is then refined as a single operation with subtraction- since the w+p = y relationship is identical to the y-w = p relationship. Rather than looking at arithmetic as operations, we see relationships and different ways of describing them. We also discover quickly from our notation that if we do assign a numerical value to the white rod, it could be any number we choose- but that doing so then fixes the value of all other rods. In this way children learn about constants and variables from the get-go, and see the transportability of mathematical relationships.
    This is of course only a quick sketch of what goes on in the Gattegno program, but hopefully it gives you some idea of the power of the approach.

    The text I learned from in elementary school was called Numbers in Color, I don't know if that is still available. Pretty much anything on math by Caleb Gattegno is an eye-opener.
     

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