Going to lower grade / hire-ability

Discussion in 'General Education' started by otterpop, Nov 2, 2020.

  1. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Nov 2, 2020

    If I want to switch schools next year and make the jump from upper elementary to lower (first or second, K is a bit scary), is there anything I can or should do now to make myself a more appealing candidate?
     
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  3. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

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    Nov 2, 2020

    It is a bit scary. I always found it easier to move up than down a grade. I have noticed over the yrs that K-3 teachers have a lot of different beliefs/expectations than 4-6. I'd spend some time on Zoom with successful teachers of younger kids and listen and learn. Maybe you could even take a class online for the level you want to move to that will inspire you and give you ideas. You could watch on you tube younger grades and get some ideas. I think a really important part too is to be familiar with the programs the new school uses. Good luck! <3
     
  4. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Nov 3, 2020

    A solid foundation in teaching reading will make a difference. Take a class or more, read up on the current research, get an endorsement in literacy. While I always had struggling readers come to me in 4th and 5th, when I moved to 2nd by choice, I used a lot of strategies that I prepped for. Also, be well grounded in knowing how to work on number sense in math.
    Good luck!
     
  5. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Since you made the move, is it something you were glad you did? I moved up a grade this year actually and I want to get back to teaching younger kids again. I miss reading stories and singing songs... not that I’m saying the younger grade teachers have it easy by any means, but my students the past few years have gotten too “mature” for things like GoNoodle breaks and I miss that kind of thing. And, my school basically does test prep all day every day for the state’s standardized tests, and it’s dreadfully dull for me and the kids. I have taught preschool in the past and student taught in K, so I know it’s a whole different level of complicated. Mostly I was wondering about the hiring side of things - are there any buzz words or certain trainings or methods I should know about when interviewing? I’m worried future principals will see upper elementary and want to place me there. When I student taught, Daily 5 was a big thing in lower grades.
     
  6. tigger88

    tigger88 Rookie

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    Nov 4, 2020

    I am a first grade teacher (this is my 6th year of teaching it) and this is what I would recommend you looking in to. Guided Reading; our school bought this book for all of us to read this past summer: The Next Step Forward in Guided Reading by Jan Richardson.
    At my school we use a program called Really Great Reading We use it to assess our students as well as help them with learning to read. https://www.reallygreatreading.com/
    I haven't ever used any of her stuff but many teachers have talked about using Lucy Calkins reading and writing books.

    You could also join some 1st and 2nd grade groups on Facebook to get ideas of what is being used in the classroom for those grades.
     
  7. tigger88

    tigger88 Rookie

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    Nov 4, 2020

  8. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Nov 5, 2020

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  9. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Nov 5, 2020

    Good luck with your change.
    I would find what that school or district uses and start researching it but as you know things change from year to year so brushing up on what others have mentioned wouldn't be a bad thing either. In addition to academic learning, refresh your knowledge of social, emotional, and developmental norms for younger children.

    I've known people to do the jump from upper elementary to lower. Some did so seamlessly and others really struggled. The ones who struggled tended to be those who had "high expectations" in upper grades (read strict and stringent). They expected younger students to be able to reason like older students and really struggled. The kids struggled even more.

    You really need to know the true capabilities of children that age. I'm not saying there won't be kids on both ends of the curve but don't go in thinking that they are just smaller versions of upper elementary kids. Research or refresh your knowledge of the brain and emotions of students of that age and how to engage them and help grow their strengths.
     
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  10. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    I know this will be an adjustment for me wherever I go. I teach at a school with very high standards for behavior and academics, high SES families, and over involved parents. Wherever I go, I’m concerned that I’m in for a culture shock, and moving down grades probably won’t help.
     
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  11. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Nov 6, 2020

    That is a whole different side to it too.
    I am all for high standards for behavior and academics, but it is really how you go about getting students to approach or reach those high standards and how you address when they don't so they learn rather than feel defeated and shut down.
     

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