Give slim kids higher marks, says diet guru

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Caesar753, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jan 4, 2012

    As someone who is "less than slim", this makes me sad. I understand, absolutely, the importance of a healthy lifestyle. I don't think, however, that success in school should be tied to it.
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Want a better grade? Get an eating disorder!

    Problem with focusing on that end number is that there are different ways to get there. Same with any other grade. One can cheat and not get caught.

    Once again, it seems as if the goal was written wrong! Should the goal be to understand and institute healthy living and eating habits not just a grade at the end? Seems we often miss the mark when we look at goals at attainable numbers.
     
  5. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    Since when is "slimness" a litmus test for health?
     
  6. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    What about general indicator can you use?

    This would obviously never come to pass... too many teachers show poor health habits themselves. It's hypocritical.
     
  7. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    What?
     
  8. TutoringMatch

    TutoringMatch Rookie

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    Thin students shouldn't be rewarded academically for being thin. It makes no sense. People should want to be healthy to be healthy, not to do better in school.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I AM more or less "thin."

    And I think it's ridiculous.

    Grades in academic subjects should be based on academics.

    I don't want a doctor or an accountant or a lawyer who majored in "thin." I don't want my kids' teachers to be ones who received academic grades for "slim" as opposed to math or history. There are too many people out there already who expect a cheering section every time they show up for something. How about using academic grades to award academic performance????

    But note that the suggestion was NOT made by an educator. It was made by a "diet guru."

    In other words, this is a publicity stunt, aimed to get his name out there so people will buy his books.
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 4, 2012

    Interesting that he's gaining traction among the French, so frequently touted for their healthy attitudes toward food and wine.
     
  11. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Good grief!!
     
  12. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    It's insane that someone's academic record could be skewed by his or her weight. I am in favor of a record which represents an accurate picture of the student's ability to understand and work with the content required by the state.

    About as genius as my brother's chemistry tracher who let him pass the course (from a failing grade) by donating boxes of pencils. Lovely.
     
  13. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Excellent points, Alice.

    This suggestion is just ridiculous. If anything, I can see the BMI being applied to a students P.E. grade, but even then, the course should focus on overall fitness, not just "slimness".
     
  14. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I will never have a "healthy" BMI. I have a weird disorder where the biochemical pathway that takes calcium for my bones doesn't know how to "turn off". As a result, I have extremely low blood calcium and ridiculously dense bones. That makes them very heavy. I'm 5'7", and when I was wearing a size 6, with my ribs sticking out and my collar bone looking like it was about to eat my neck, I still weighed 170lbs. Bu every visual indicator, I was extremely underweight. I looked sick, but still had a BMI of 26.6, which is above a "healthy" BMI.

    So, in short, I think this is a very bad idea.
     
  15. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    By the same token, I feel I need to lose some weight (something I've never had to worry about before), but according to the formula in the article, my BMI is less than 7. :confused:

    I can assure you I do not look that "slim".
     
  16. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    This is ridiculous.
     
  17. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Jan 14, 2012

    So sad. Just as calories are not a good way to regulate food, weight is not a good way to calculate health. It's the bigger picture-fat, sodium, vitamins, etc., just as we should be looking at looking at endurance, strength, body image, food choices, etc.

    I just ran a marathon. I do Crossfit. I have done triathlons. Yet I eat like crap and am not thin. Where would I fall? Am I healthy? Who knows. But a teacher just looking at me would certainly not be able to tell.
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jan 15, 2012

    I would have qualified for the "higher marks" based on BMI in school and I still think this is ridiculous even from that perspective. Yes, everyone can diet and exercise, but so much of BMI is based on genetics. If I eat "okay" and exercise some, I am naturally built to maintain a healthy frame. It's not something I ever really "tried" to maintain when I was younger- that's just how I was built. I don't think it would be fair for someone like me to get higher grades for something I was born with. Some people are simply built more muscular and may be fit, but overweight according to the BMI scale. Not to mention the genetic factors, when children are overweight parents are often more to blame than a child. A child eats what mom or dad puts on the table- they don't really have a choice in the matter. If mom and dad don't teach them about proper portion size and being active, by the time they start to learn this in health class they may be starting out already overweight which makes it a lot harder on them to lose/maintain. Also, I would imagine that focusing on losing weight in a shorter time frame (the article said something about students starting out overweight and then losing it making higher grades- which to me implies over a semester or something like that) would probably encourage eating disorder type of behaviors rather than healthy lifestyle changes.
     
  19. Nathan6329

    Nathan6329 Rookie

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    Jan 15, 2012

    I know this may seem kind of cynical, but I cannot see a scenario like this working without causing anger and hostility from students and parents.

    You're skinny so you get extra bonus points and get an A.

    Well I'm sorry, you could have gotten this A if you would have lost some weight, but you only got enough points for a B+ because you're too fat.
     
  20. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jan 16, 2012

    That is quite saddening because my BMI is not between 18-25. In high school, though, I made myself sick to lose 24 pounds in just a few months, and it makes me even more sad to think about it. It was a petty plea back then. Thinking about all this, my weight has never had anything to do with my intelligence. I would not want to feel pressured by someone to lose weight, either.
     
  21. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Jan 16, 2012

    1. This is just beyond the pale.
    2. I'm all for eating healthily (I do myself) but grades should reflect the objectives of the class. Do we now make the standards state, Students will know the causes of the American Revolution and express those causes by being slim? Students will be able to express a working knowledge of math operations while remaining slim? Seriously?
    3. I think if Americans adopt this model you will see a swell in homeschooling like no other time in educational history. (no pun intended.:D)
     

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