Give me the 'inside scoop'.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by FutureTeacher33, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    Sep 14, 2012

    Hi, sorry for an additional thread. I just thought of 1 more question I'd like to ask because I hear different things from different sources/people and I want to get the 'inside scoop' from current professionals.

    In my state of Virginia, they are currently advertising English teachers, Modern Language teachers, and Minority teachers (amongst some other subjects/area) as 'high needs areas'.

    I am pursuing a major in English, with a minor in French. I am also a minority. But although they are advertising for 'teachers in demand', there are still several teachers being laid off and budget cuts/school closings pretty often.

    I am not set to graduate for another few years, so who knows what the future holds. But, I wanted to ask you all if there is truly a demand for what I am pursuing?

    I will be HIGHLY upset if I worked hard to earn my degrees and then there is not an opportunity for me.
     
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  3. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    I just replied to your other thread but I will comment here too :) My best friend graduated in May with a teaching degree in English. She has been doing everything in her power to secure a job but has only gotten one interview. That being said, she says she often goes weeks without seeing an English position even posted on any of the many, many job websites she checks. BUT she is also in MI, where the market is very tough all around. I don't know how it is in Virginia, but I have never heard that English is a high demand area. I know it was one of the more popular majors at my university... But if they are advertising it as a high needs area, maybe it is in your state!
     
  4. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    I know you said she resides in MI, but is she only applying for jobs there or is she searching in other states as well?

    See, I am not sure if the VDOE means English literature or ESL. All they said on their official website was 'English'.

    It truly is unfortunate that your friend cannot find a job. That actually scares me! I don't want that to happen to me.

    I don't like math personally and so I wouldn't want to teach it, even though I know it's a high needs area. I don't mind science as much, but I am not passionate about the subject and so I wouldn't want to teach that either. I know the History market is saturated, so I don't even want to think about it. I have just always LOVED Language Arts in grade school and knew that would be my subject of choice as far as teaching goes.

    I'll have a minor in French, so hopefully that could make me more marketable, as far as maybe being able to teach the language part-time while fulfulling full-time duties as an English teacher? :confused:

    I'll also have my endorsement in ESL. I am really hoping that these certifications in French and ESL will help to make me more marketable to find an English position, that way I cna get closer to getting IB experience. But, at the very least, if I can't find a job as an English teacher, I could get a job as a full-time French or ESL teacher. :unsure:
     
  5. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    I actually would REALLY like to be an elementary teacher in a bilingual/dual language school. I would even like to open my own French Immersion School. However, more inmportant, I want to travel and be able to show my children the world. So, I am looking into teaching abroad. The only thing about teaching abroad is that I have a non-teaching spouse and two children. The international schools usually save elementary positions for single applicants and/or teaching couples. So, I would not stand a chance, to be frank. But, if I stayed in the States, that's something I would love to do!!

    I wish there was two of me lol.
     
  6. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    I should have said that earlier, she is not looking in other states only MI. Being willing to relocate makes a difference.

    Also, I do think having an ESL certificate would make you more marketable for sure. It is funny because she actually has a French minor as well! But does not have ESL training.

    She can also only teach 7-12 grade. If you have ESL you could teach in the younger grades right? I teach at a private school and we have a Spanish teacher who does K-8... could you do something like that in French?

    I never thought I would end up teaching middle school, but I love it! It seems like there are more middle school teaching jobs (at least when I was looking) then strictly elementary or high school. Maybe you could teach middle school French or English! It sounds like you have a lot of options with your certifications. I think you are smart for having major/minors that give you a wider range of jobs to apply for. I did that as well and ended up in one of my minor areas teaching middle school science.
     
  7. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    That's great that she has a minor in French..that is awesome, actually! I am sure if she looks in other places that she should find something. If she goes that route, would you mind keeping me updated on the results she finds?

    Oh yeah, definitely with a language endorsement like French or ESL you can teach grades K-12. So, it truly is versatile!

    I would be interested in teaching Middle Schools. Middle or High School, either is fine with me. Thank you! I really do agree that it's best to not close yourself into ONE set thing because you never know. I am glad it worked out for you!!! Those endorsements/certifications really do come in handy and you could wind up doing something you truly do enjoy, like you are! I am glad to hear that!
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 14, 2012

    I can't begin to predict the future. But I can tell you about the past and the present.

    In recent memory-- say, the past 40 years or so-- much of the country has experienced a huge glut of teachers in Secondary English.

    Then, in 2008, the economy crashed. Money became very tight, and the last year or two have seen teacher layoffs in mind boggling numbers.

    So there are lots and lots of experienced English teachers trying for fewer and fewer jobs.

    As much as I know you don't want to read this, I have to tell you: there's going to be LOTS of competition for every single opening that exists.

    How much being a minority or that French degree will play into your chances, I don't know. But I would expect to have to fight pretty hard to earn a job for the forseeable future.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Hopefully this will give you some perspective.

    As a former Michigander with friends who moved to NoVa to teach, I can tell you that the NoVa market is a million times easier than Michigan- regardless of your certification area.

    I'm not saying it is easy- but in relation to MI, it is a breeze.
     
  10. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    Sep 15, 2012

    I see that same thing here in IN... a friend was recently looking for a new job and didn't face nearly the amount of competition as she would looking for the same position in MI. In fact, she was offered three jobs! Around central IN there are also a lot more private/charter schools to apply to than where I am from in MI. It's probably not a fair comparison between MI and other states!
     
  11. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    I'd say it depends on your area. In my district, we hire over 100 new teachers every year. (Of course, it's because people can't take the working conditions and leave for much greener pastures.)

    On the other hand, many high schools prefer English teachers with a degree in pure English - so that could very well work in your favor.
     
  12. bison

    bison Habitué

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    Honestly, if you will be "VERY upset" at being unable to quickly find a job after graduation, I wouldn't recommend going into any kind of teaching other than secondary math and science right now. While there are certainly exceptions in different areas, it's pretty difficult in most parts of the country.
     
  13. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    As someone mentioned, there are many Secondary ELA positions open in my distirct but that's because the turnover rate is very high in Baltimore City.

    That being said, if you can get a K-8 endorsement, there seems to be a higher demand for reading teachers or K-8 ELA teachers than just 9-12 English teachers. The demand seems to be in the ELEM (K-5) area overall.
     
  14. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    This is very unfortunate and doesn't work in my favor. I don't know what I should do. My career goal is to teach internationally. But, in order to be competitive, I have to gain at least 2 years of experience here in the U.S. I don't want to have a very little chance of being able to gain experience.
    I don't know if it would be best to continue with my major in English/minor in French or to major in Interdisciplinary Studies with a minor in French to become an elementary school teacher in a dual lauguage school.

    The elementary school route is great because I am very interested in bilingual education. However, international schools would prefer to save these positions for teaching couples or singles with no dependant, which I am not. So, going this route, I may only be able to teach here in the U.S. or in Canada.

    But, if I major in English to teach grades 6-12, I will have a better chance of getting hired internationally, but not so sure how likely it is for me to be able to get a position as a new graduate.

    Not sure of what to do.:huh:
     
  15. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    Hm, why thank you for your response! I didn't know having a B.A in English was something that would stand out amongst the crowd, but I guess a lot of applicants just have an English endorsement or certification..?
     
  16. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    Well, of course it would be lovely if I could land a job RIGHT after graduation, but that wouldn't be a realistic expectation. What I am expressing there is that..I don't want be out of work for 6 months + after spending so many years in school being that my state is offering incentives for becoming a teacher and informing us these subjects and teachers are 'in demand'. Wouldn't that be false advertising? Didn't something like that happen with the law industry when they were advertising that law was 'in demand' but graduates couldn't find any jobs & they ended up suing

    That's the type of thing I don't want to happen to me, is what I'm saying.

    It just seems like if it's this bad and experienced teachers can't find jobs, why would they be saying they need more teachers, you know?
     
  17. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    I appreciate your post. Would you mind taking a look at one of my other posts in this thread? It was directed at another member, but it was just me explaining how I don't know if the best choice for me would be to teach English or elementary. I would just like your opinion on what you think would be the better choice.

    How do you get a K-8 endorsement? In my state (VA) they only offer K-6.
     
  18. bison

    bison Habitué

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    Where I live, it's now the norm for it take much longer than 6 months to find a job unless you're in a high-need position like secondary science. I totally understand the frustration, but that's just how it is in most places right now. I'm getting my teaching credential anyway, but I expect to have to sub for a while.
     
  19. tchr4evr

    tchr4evr Companion

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    Not sure about where in Virginia

    I teach in Virginia, and last year was the first time in my area where there were actually 4 English positions posted. (And that's since I moved here 8 years ago) And we have 12 different districts within 45 minutes of each other. I was looking, possibly trying for a better position than what I have, and I got one interview over the summer. I have 12 years experience, am endorsed in 3 subjects, two of them K-12. I was told by one of the schools with whom I'm friends with one of the assistant principals that 100 people applied for 1 job. They ended up taking one of the least experienced (money).

    If you love it, you should do it . . . things may get better in 3 years . . . but it has never been a high needs market. But, be prepared to substitute or do something else while you're waiting for that job.
     
  20. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    Oh gosh. Now, I really don't know what to do!

    My goal is to teach internationally, but if I can't find a job here, I can't teach internationally because I won't have any of the experience I need!
     
  21. FutureTeacher33

    FutureTeacher33 Rookie

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    This is REALLY discouraging. I am actually located in Richmond, VA, but we are talking about moving to NC soon (not sure how their market is for teachers..?).

    How can I get endorsed in elementary education? It's an endorsement I would like to have outside of what I am currently pursuing?
     
  22. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    NoVa is an easier market than NC. I don't know much about central VA.
    Besides, you may want to check a pay scale before moving here. 4 years of experience pays a whopping $30,880. I wouldn't expect a pay raise for several years, either.

    North Carolina pay scale- state wide
     
  23. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Then get a K-6 certification because I do see more of a demand for ELEM teachers over secondary/7-12 in the ELA area. The issue is that at the ELEM level you have to be a jack of all trades. Also, consider you local job market as there may not be as many ELEM openings in your area as there are in my district.

    In regards to which is better - teaching ELEM or Secondary ELA - depends on you. I have never taught below 6th grade and that's because 1.) my certification is in grades 7-12 and 2.) teaching kids so young would drive me crazy. Teaching MS drives me crazy now so I know the little ones would do me in. It all depends on you and your personality. Many people love the little ones and would never want to teach teenagers.
     
  24. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Decide which level/content you will LOVE and which job you will wake up with PASSION for each and every day. We can't decide that for you. Then throw yourself into your studies and be the best student you can, while adding experiences to your resume to help you stand out. You can volunteer to mentor or tutor a student or two, or work in an after school program.

    All teaching jobs have many applicants, so one of the best ways to stand out is by having excellent content knowledge, passion for teaching, and great experiences to talk about in cover letters and interviews.

    Don't pick your teaching certification on the perception of what is easiest to get hired in. Instead, figure out where you are going to fit best, then your future students will get the best teacher possible.
     
  25. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    I think once you're in a district things can only get better from there. You will get that job you dreamed of as a LTS.
     

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