Getting to know you icebreakers

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Cyndi23, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. Cyndi23

    Cyndi23 Companion

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    Aug 15, 2007

    What are some of your favorites? What works well?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. peachieteachie

    peachieteachie Comrade

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    Aug 15, 2007

    I enjoy doing an activity called a "Me Bag" On the first day I would bring a bag of items that represents me in some kind of way or items that are important to me. I would present myself to the class by showing and explaining the ideas. This really helps the students get to know me.

    I would assign the students a "Me Bag" homework assignment by giving them each a paper bag, telling them to decorate it, and place 4-5 special items. The next day each student would show and explain their "Me Bag"

    I have done this with 1st graders, 4th graders, and 5th graders and I found that kids of all ages enjoy this. I think it is a great way to show who you are to the rest of the class and they really get to know some important things about you.
     
  4. Weazy

    Weazy Comrade

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    Aug 16, 2007

    Icebreaker

    This is a first day activity which they create name tags without their names.

    I use construction paper cut in half, but a variety of other materials can be used. Each student chooses a piece. I tell them to pick a color that relates to them. (mood, favorite, etc.) They are to decorate the nametag, but only put their name on the back.
    I buy cheap do-dads at Big Lots, Wal-Mart (buttons, fun foam...) I like the multi-packs of scrap-booking paper, too. They use a lot of this. They can also use items from home since it will be their first assignment. Oh--they can also cut their nametag in a shape that describes them, too. They must use symbols, colors, objects, pictures, etc., that represent themselves. I encourage them to think beyond football player, cheerleader, and focus on who they are when they are away from their friends; quiet, reflective, bookworm. If they want to say they play a sport, I encourage them to look for other descriptive words, such as, competitive. Once they have created their nametags, each student explains his/hers to the class. This lets me hear their verbal skills and see their personalities. I can tell who will probably be the quiet students and who will be the performers. I ususally have a few who don't bring it in finished. This gives me a small inclination as to who the " never have homework completed" students might be. I don't expect everybody to be an artist, and those who simply draw on their nametag still have fun explaining it.

    Because I start the class by going over classroom procedures and expectations, we run out of time to finish. This is their first assignment. I always tell them that this will be the easiest assignment they receive from me all year. It is worth 10 points.
    I use sticky tac and hang them on my closet doors. They look nice, add color, and each class has fun guessing who made which nametag from the other classes
     
  5. mommee03

    mommee03 Companion

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    Aug 16, 2007


    Love it!! Consider this stole. :haha:
     
  6. redman98

    redman98 New Member

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    Aug 16, 2007

    For any teachers looking for an idea for older students (works with high schoolers and even college) I've had success with this one:

    Have all the students line up along a wall, and tell them they need to get themselves in order by birthdate. Two rules: no talking at all, and no writing anything. Then turn them loose!

    Older students will likely have IDs (driver's licences/permits) with their birthdates on them, but most of them probably won't think to use them. You'll mostly see hand signals until someone thinks of the ID cards. You will also likely see some students moving up and down the line helping people get arranged in order.

    This serves two purposes. It gives the students a chance to learn something about each other in a fun activity, and it also gives you (the teacher) a chance to see who the leaders in your classroom are. They're the ones that take charge and move the other students around in the line.

    I don't know how well it would work with younger students (without the ID cards it might take awhile), but good luck! I have one of my own high school teachers to thank for that one.
     
  7. smannes

    smannes Companion

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    Aug 16, 2007

    I've actually done this in a camp setting with second - sixth graders and never had a problem with it. They've always figured it out.
     
  8. Mr.G

    Mr.G Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2007

    With my 6th graders I do the following:

    I have them all write down one thing about themselves that no one would know just by looking at them. Maybe it's that they can ice skate, or they can burp the alphabet or what not

    Then we put them into a bucket and as a class we try to decide who wrote the clue

    It's a great way to ease the tension of the 1st day of middle school, as well as a great way for me to know the students names. You can match students names wiht activites, and I usually have all the names down by the 3rd day of school.

    I also put myself in there...usually with either "i've seen over 300 different bands live" or "I'm what the us navy calls a blue nose, because I've been north of hte arctic circle." For some reason, the kids never figure out mine.

    Lastly, there is usually one kid who the kids keep saying "oh, it's him," and it never is...it leads to good laughs
     

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